Blankets, Quilts, and Comforters:
Articles in Civil War Era Newspapers


1860

[Little Rock] Old-Line Democrat,  January 5, 1860, p. 4, c. 4

Blankets.

                I have on hand a few pair of fine Bed-Blankets, Blue Blankets, Grey Blankets, etc., which I will sell cheap.
                                                                                                                                
                Loui George.

[Little Rock] Old-Line Democrat, January 5, 1860, p. 4, c. 4

Extra Fine.

Bed Blankets, 8-4, 10-4, and 12-4, for sale for Cash, at low prices, by
                                                                                                                                
                Filkins.

Gents Shoulder Blankets.

Plain and Fancy, at prices to suit all—at
                                                                                                                                
                Filkins.

 

 

[Little Rock] Old-Line Democrat, January 5, 1860, p. 4, c. 3

Red Blankets and Blue Blankets,

Of a Superior Quality—For sale by

                                                                                                                                           Brugman & Co. 

[Little Rock] Old-Line Democrat, January 5, 1860, p. 4, c. 3

Cotton Laps!  Cotton Laps!

For making quilts and comforts, for sale very low, by
                                                                                                
                                Brugman & Co.
Oct. 13, 1859.

[Marshall] Texas Republican, May 19, 1860, p. 2, c. 5

White Goods.

                A very handsome stock of  . . Marseilles and Honey Comb Quilts, Furniture Dimity, Bonnet Cord, &c., just received and for sale at prices to suit the times by.
                                                                                                
                Bradfield & Talley.

Mobile Daily Register, May 30, 1860, p. p. 1, c. 3

List of Premiums Awarded the Seventh Annual Fair at the
Mobile Agricultural and Horticultural Society
Held 10th and 11th May, 1860

......[copied all needlework]

Quilts

No. 52--One imitation Marseilles work, double wreath center and corner bouquets, 1st prem, Mrs. Hatter                                                                                                                                                                         $5 00
"    52--One imitation Marseilles, wreath and bouquet in the center, 2d prem, Mrs. J. C. Holcomb                                                                                                                                                                                        $3 00
"    52--One wreath and bouquet center crib quilt 3d prem, Mrs. M. A. Fordney                      $2 50
"    164--Triangle star, white, brown and yellow, 4th prem, Mrs. M. A. Fordney                       $2 50
"    153--Yellow and Red Dahlia, 5th prem, Mrs. S. S. Ruggles                                                 $2 50
"    146--One Quilt, Rose of Sharon, 6th prem Mrs. J. C. Rupert                                              $2 50
"    62--One wreath Quilt, made by a lady 80 years old, 7th prem, Mrs. McKibbon                   $2 50
"    58--One star Quilt, diamonds intermixed, 8th prem, Miss S. P. Stodder                                $2 50
"    151--One Quilt, Tulip and squares, 9th prem, Mrs. J. A. Battelle                                           $2 50
"    170--One Quilt, double Irish chain, 10th prem, Mrs. P. E. Collins                                           $2 00
"    17--One crib Quilt, crown and star pattern, each crown containing 97 pieces, 11th prem, Mrs. H. B. Harwood                                                                                                                                   $2 00
"    148--One patch work quilt, made by a little boy 8 years old, special, Master Albert Golay                                                                                                                                        $1 00
"    46--One Quilt, diamond and half diamond pattern, 12th prem, Mrs. L. Cage                        $2 00
"    58--One Quilt, diamond and half diamond pattern, 13th prem, Miss Sallie A. Stodder                                                                                                                                   $2 00
"    46--One Quilt, 14th prem, Mrs. L. Cage                                                                            $2 00
"    145--One Quilt, block work, special, Mrs. J. C. Rupert                                                    $2 00
"    163--One Jenny Lind Quilt, palm leaf border, 15th prem, Mrs. H. Goff                              $2 00
"    146--Patch work Quilt, made by Ella Y Rupert 8 years old, unquilted; special Mrs. J. C. Rupert                                                                                                                                  $1 00

Silk Quilts

No. 35--One silk Scrap Quilt, Mosaic design, 1st prem, Mrs. C. C. Langdon                             $5 00
"    28--One silk Quilt, Mosaic block work, 2d prem, Mrs. W. T. Marshall                                 $4 00
"    20--Bed and Crib Quilt, octagon star, 3d prem, Mrs. Jacob Magee                                       $4 00

Counterpanes and Spreads

No. 32--One white Spread, with knit fringe, 1st prem, Mrs. A. Golay                                          $2 00
"    151--White and blue Spread, 2d prem, Miss J. A. Battelle                                                      $2 00

 

1861

Savannah [GA] Republican, January 24, 1861, p. 1, c. 6

Direct Importation
From England,
by
Nevitt, Lathrop & Rogers.

Bales Blankets. . .

Now Landing,
From ship C. C. Duncan, From L'pool.
Also:
To Arrive, and Daily Expected, by
Ship New England, From L'ool:

Bales London Duffil Blankets.
Bales London Union Blankets.

Bales London Colored Blankets. . .

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, May 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3
               
Advice to Volunteers.—How to prepare for the Campaign.—A writer, who signs himself "An Old Soldier," gives the following advice to young soldiers: . . .
               
2.  Line your blanket with one thickness of brown drilling.  This adds but four ounces in weight, and doubles the warmth. . . .
               
7.  A sudden check of perspiration by chilly or night air often causes fever and death.  When thus exposed, do not forget your blanket.

Semi-Weekly Raleigh Register, May 18, 1861, p. 2, c. 2-3

Soldiers' Health.
From Hall's New York Journal of Health.

                1.  In any ordinary campaign, sickness disables or destroys three times as many as the sword. . . .
               
4.  Colored blankets are best, and if lined with brown drilling the warmth and durability are doubled, while the protection against dampness from lying on the ground, is almost complete. 

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, May 25, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
Suitable Materials for Army Clothing.—The following is from a graduate of West Point, someone who has seen service, and whose opinions are entitled to consideration:
               
. . . Clothing is usually issued twice a year, in quantities as follows:  To each soldier one hat, one forage camp, one uniform coat, two sack coats, one pair drawers, three flannel shirts, four pair [illegible], four pair stockings in one year, two blankets, two leather stocks in five years; three pair of trowsers the first year, two pair the second. 

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, May 25, 1861, p. 2, c. 5       
Good Suggestion.—We have been shown by Dr. Everett a most excellent article for our soldiers.  It consists of two widths of cotton osnaburgs sewed together, forming a blanket 2 ½ yards long and 2 yards wide.  It has a lit in the middle, so as to serve as a Mexican ponchar [sic], and its chief use is to sleep on and cover with at night.  A little paint and oil makes it an excellent water proof tarpaulin and the whole cost will be about 76 cents.  Every soldier should instantly provide himself with one, for it is folly to go to the field without something to protect from rain and dampness.
                                                                                                
                [Charlottesville Review.

[Marshall] Texas Republican, May 25, 1861,p. 2, c. 7

To Young Soldiers.

How to prepare for the Campaign.—"An Old Soldier," in one of our exchanges makes the following pithy hints to young volunteers, and they should be heeded. . . .
            2nd.  Line your blanket with one thickness of brown drilling.  This adds but four ounces in weight and doubles the warmth.
            3rd.  Buy a small India-rubber blanket (only $1.50) to lay on the ground or to throw over your shoulders when on guard duty during a rain-storm.  Most of the Eastern troops are provided with these.  Straw to lie upon is not always to be had. . . .
            7th.  A sudden check of perspiration by chilly or night air often causes fever and death.  When thus exposed do not forget your blanket.
 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, May 30, 1861, p. 1, c. 6
               
Advice to Volunteers—How to Prepare for the Campaign.—A writer, who signs himself "An Old Sodlier," gives the following advice to young soldiers: . . .
               
2.  Line your blanket with one thickness of brown drilling.  This adds but four ounces in weight, and doubles the warmth.
               
3.  Buy a small india-rubber blanket—only $1 50—to lay on the ground or to throw over your shoulders when on guard duty during a rain storm. . . .
                7.  A sudden check of perspiration by chilly or night air often causes fever and death.  When thus exposed do not forget your blanket.

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, June 8, 1861, p. 1, c. 6
               
Rules for Health.—The following [illegible] rules for soldiers, for the [illegible] during a campaign, are written by Dr. Hall, editor of the New York Journal of Health: . . .
               
4.  Colored blankets are best, and if lined with brown drilling the warmth and durability are doubled, while the protection against dampness from lying on the ground is almost complete. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, June 13, 1861, p. 1, c. 2-3

Soldiers' Health—Interesting Suggestions
and Recommendations.

The following article, on "Soldiers' Health," is from Hall's New York Journal of Health.  It contains much valuable information for both soldiers and civilians: . . .
               
4.  Colored blankets are best, and if lined with brown drilling the warmth and durability are doubled, while the protection against dampness from lying on the ground is almost complete. . . .
                12.  Never go to sleep, especially after a great effort, even in hot weather, without some covering over you.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, July 25, 1861, p. 2, c, 3

An Appeal to the Women of Arkansas.

                It has been wisely suggested by a contemporary that the patriotic women of the country should knit socks for the volunteers.
               
In addition to this we beg leave to call the attention of the true hearted women of the country to some other points.
               
There will be, if the war continues, a scarcity of blankets, woolen cloth, flannel, etc.  These our soldiers will need.  As regards blankets, each family can spare some.  Those who stay at home can use counterpanes and comforts.  The latter are easily and cheaply made, are warm and will supply the places of blankets in the house.—Let the ladies, or to use a better and nobler word, the women, set about making comforters for their beds, and be enabled to send blankets to the army.  Except in cases of sickness, the use of blankets in the houses can be dispensed with. . . . 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, July 25, 1861, p. 3, c. 8  [most of right side of paper folded and torn]
Summary:  An Appeal to the Ladies of Arkansas.  Seems to be for blankets and socks.

Daily Chronicle & Sentinel [Augusta, Ga.], July 26, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
Home-Made Blanket.--We have seen a magnificent home-spun blanket, manufactured by Mrs. Frank M. David, of Jackson county, and presented to Capt. A. C. Thompson, of the "Oconee Guards" of that county.  It is worth half-a-dozen common blankets.  Our fair countrywomen can now do essential service to the country by reviving the industrious habits of their mothers in the fabrication of useful articles.--Athens Watchman.
 

Southern Confederacy [Atlanta, Ga.], July 26, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

Home-Made Blanket.

                The Athens Watchman speaks of having seen a magnificent home-spun blanket, manufactured by Mrs. Frank M. David, of Jackson county, and presented to Capt. A. C. Thompson, of the "Oconee Guards" of that county.  It is worth, he says, half a dozen common blankets.  Our fair country women can now do essential service to the country by reviving the industrious habits of their mothers in the fabrication of useful articles. 

Daily Chronicle & Sentinel [Augusta, Ga.], August 10, 1861, p. 2, c. 3
               
Gov. Moore to the Alabama Ladies.--Gov. Moore, of Alabama, has issued his proclamation recommending the women of each county, city, town, village and neighborhood, in Alabama, to form "Soldiers' Aid Societies," and that each Society inform him by letter, as early as possible, the number of woolen uniforms, flannel shirts, and cotton-flannel drawers it can make or supply, and that each family make contributions of blankets for the use of the troops of the State, to the Judges of Probate in their respective counties, who will register the name of the contributor and the number contributed, in a book to be kept by him specially for that purpose, and who will box up and forward blankets, whenever a sufficient number is obtained, to the Governor, who will defray the expense of boxing and forwarding.
 

Semi-Weekly Raleigh Register, August 17, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

Winter Clothing for Soldiers.

                We earnestly call attention to the circular of the Governor of this State which will be found in to-day's paper.  If we would act justly by our gallant defenders, the men who are perilling their all in the defence of our rights, our lives and our liberties, we will lose no time in fitting them out as well as possible for their encounter with the rigors of a winter campaign.  Exposed as they will be, in tents and in open air, night and day they will need their winter supplies in October.  Let then every household that can spare any contribution, send it promptly forward.  Blankets and good yarn country-knit Socks are especially needed.

Daily Chronicle & Sentinel [Augusta, Ga.], August 21, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
    
           Clothing for the Soldiers.--All who can do so should, at the earliest possible day, make up something like the following, for their friends and relatives, omitting such, of course, as have heretofore been furnished: . . .
                One good blanket--lined is advisable.
   

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, August 22, 1861, p. 1, c.6

Clothing for the Soldiers—Circular
Letter from the Military Board.

                                                                                                                Office Military Board,                }
                                                                                                
                Little Rock, August 20, 1861.    }
. . .           Blankets are greatly needed and are indispensable to the comfort of our soldiers.  In many instances domestic blankets may be manufactured.  In others they may be supplied by a division of the articles of that kind which families have provided for themselves.  There is scarcely a house in the State in which there is not an excess of bed-clothing.  It is not making too great a call on the patriotism of the county, at a time like this, to ask that the soldiers be supplied from this surplus and abundance.  Where blankets cannot be supplied comforts may be substituted; but brankets [sic] are much preferred.  All the other articles of soldiers clothing such as woolen uniforms, flannel shirts, drawers, socks, etc., are equally needed.  Whenever shoes can be supplied they will also be received and paid for in the manner and in the currency already indicated. . . .
                                                                                                
                                H. M. Rector,
                                                                                                
                                Benj. C. Totten,
Aug. 22, 1861.                                                                                                                       Military Board.

 

Semi-Weekly Raleigh Register, August 24, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

                                                                                                                For the Register.

                                                                                                Headquarters 5th Regiment                }

. . . You ask what we require.  We answer, overcoats, blankets, socks, shoes, flannel shirts, drawers.  Look with me at that sentinel, who is now passing steadily along, while the clouds pour their fury upon him.  What is thrown over his shoulders?  His blanket.  When his rounds are over what has he to cover him—that same wet blanket.  And the nice socks and shoes which you were at provided, where are they?  I hear this gentle voice continue.  Gone, worn out, tramped out in marching and counter-marching, is our response; and to add to our anxieties, we now feel for the first time, the heavy hand of sickness in our camp.  I say, for the first time, because at the Camp Winslow, our position was so pleasant, and we were so well cared for, that diseases of a severe kind touched us but lightly—indeed the 5th was the healthiest Regiment in the State.  These rains and the want of sufficiently thick clothing have brought pneumonia upon us badly.  Oh!  could you hear the hollow coughs reverberating round you as I now hear them, the death-knell of many a brave and gallant though humble soldier, you would snatch the covers from your beds, the rugs from your luxurious firesides to protect and shelter them. . .  It was however with an honest purpose and I have spoken frankly—you will always fine me a                                   Plain Dealer.

                August 13th, 1861. 

[Marshall] Texas Republican, August 24, 1861, p. 1, c. 5-6

Letter from Virginia.

                                                                                                                 Richmond, Va., August 6th, 1861.
R. W. Loughery, Esq.,
               
. . . Whatever may be our means to buy them—blankets are going to be hard to get for our soldiers next fall.  Let me make a suggestion to our ladies.  Every household has several blankets, cotton is plenty, and calico is comparatively cheap.  Let our ladies go at once to manufacturing "comforts" for home use and send the blankets to the soldiers.  If a plan like this be adopted, those of us who will be sleeping under warm cotton comforts at home next winter will feel all the better to know that our gallant defenders in the mountains of Maryland, Virginia, and Missouri have a warm and comfortable blanket voluntarily contributed by our citizens. . . . 
               
I have written you very hurriedly and hastily.
                                                                                                
                Yours truly,
                                                                                                
                                W. B. Ochiltree.
 

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, August 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
Clothing for the Soldiers.—The Military Board has sent circular letters to the different counties, and published an advertisement in the True Democrat, calling on the citizens to furnish clothing for our soldiers now in the field. . . .
               
As blankets are necessary to our soldiers in camp, all who have extra numbers of them are asked to divide with the soldiers.  All shoes which may be supplied will be paid for.
               
As winter approaches the committees are urged to be diligent and prompt in the discharge of the duties assigned them.

Mobile Register and Advertiser, August 24, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

Cotton Batting for Comforts.

                All persons wishing to make COMFORTS for Winter Covering, cam obtain COTTON BATTING for the same at the Rooms of the MILITARY AID SOCIETY, No. 75 North Conception, between State and Congress streets.
               
Those who prefer to pay the Society for the BATTING, can do so, otherwise it will be furnished free of charge.
               
aug11  1m                                                                              AD. Chaudron, Secretary.
 

The Southern Watchman [Athens, Ga.], August 28, 1861, p. 1, c. 5

                                                                Clothing for the Soldiers.

                All who can do so should, at the earliest possible day, make up something like the following, for their friends and relatives, omitting such, of course, as have heretofore been furnished: . . .
    
           One good blanket--lined is advisable.
   

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, August 29, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

Clothing for the Soldiers Again.

                We again direct attention to the effort to supply our brave volunteers with the clothing necessary for the winter.  The change of the weather and the time of the year admonish us that winter will soon be upon us and that we must be active and vigilant to meet the necessities of our winter preparations.  The general and universal suspension of trade and commerce render it impossible to procure clothing in the ordinary markets of the country.  We must rely upon the patriotism and liberality of the people to supply such comforts as will be necessary to keep our brave and patriotic little army in the field, during the coming winter months.  It is a high necessity that addresses itself to every citizen who feels an interest in the cause in which we are all alike embarked.  Then let the different agents of the State in the various counties proceed at once to the establishment of depots of clothing, and the procurement of subscriptions to it.  Let the blankets and all supplies needed for clothing, or for shelter and comfort be forwarded immediately.  At home, if need be, we can dispense with blankets, and substitute comforts, quilts and other coverlets.  In the camp and in the field nothing will supply the place of the blanket. . . .

Daily Chronicle & Sentinel [Augusta, Ga.], August 31, 1861, p.  2, c. 1-2

Remember the Soldier.

                . . . The weather has recently been very wet in Virginia, and it is even now getting quite cool, especially in the mountains.  And right now the soldiers need good blankets and flannel shirts almost as much as they every will. . . .
    
           It has been urged that as blankets are very scarce, if indeed it be possible to buy them at all, the people should give their own to the soldiers.  We agree to this heartily, and when families can not afford to give them, let them sell their blankets.  Every family can readily furnish from one to half a dozen, and use comforts, or something of that sort for themselves.  Blankets are the only covering that will answer for the soldier in camp, and these ought to be lined with oil-cloth if possible.  Comforts, sheets, coverlets and such like, should be contributed for hospital purposes, but the blankets alone for the soldiers in service.  Remember the soldier, and provide liberally and fully for all the wants of those who are fighting for us who stay at home.
 

Daily Chronicle & Sentinel [Augusta, Ga.], August 31, 1861, p. 2, c. 2-3

Correspondence of Savannah Republican.
Our Sick Soldiers--Winter Supplies.

                                                                                                Richmond, Virginia, August 25, 1861.  
. . . I was surprised to find, as you will be to hear, that eighty blankets could not be bought in Richmond. . . .  The deficiency must be supplied from the people at home.  Every family can give one blanket, and some can give more.  The little girls and the grandmothers can knit socks and gloves and comforters, and the young ladies and middle-aged can spin and weave and sew, and thus furnish the pants and coats.  Everybody should do something.  The men will advance the necessary funds.  The shoemakers will do their duty--I never knew one who would not.  But no more of them should think of volunteering.  They can do more at home--and so can gunsmiths, tailors and factory operatives--than in the army.

               
. . . I tried yesterday to purchase a woolen neck tie or comforter for my own use, but could not find one in Richmond.  If nothing better can be had, our women can sew together strips of flannel or jeans, which would answer a very good purpose for the protection of the throat.  The men who fought at Manassas will not be too proud to wear anything that comes from home.
 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, September 5, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

Extract of a Letter from Capt. Galloway.

                                                                                                                Camp at Pond Springs, Mo.,       }
                                                                                                
                August 21st, 1861.                      }
               
We are getting along tolerably; our men are suffering for want of tents, blankets and clothing; we are also running short of provisions, have only flour, beef and bacon; no sugar or coffee.  This state of things cannot last long—if we cannot get provisions here, we will have to move into Arkansas.
               
I told Lieut. King to see Vaughan, Ashley, Keatts and others, and try and get them to send us 80 or 100 suits of clothes.  Try and do all you can for us.  If there is any probability of getting them, have the blouse or sack coat made of some gray color—could get along without the pants if we can't get them.  I must close, nothing more at present.
                                                                                                
                                M. G. G. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, September 5, 1861, p. 2, c. 6
               
The undersigned, appointed by the Military Board, as a central committee for the county of Pulaski, for the purpose of procuring clothing for the soldiers, would state that they are ready to receive as donations or to purchase and receipt for any articles suitable for that purpose.  The room over the store of Mr. Jacob Hawkins, has been tendered to the committee, as a place for deposit; and any article, such as blankets, woolen socks, shirts or drawers, woolen cloths, suitable for making soldiers' clothing and shoes will be received and receipted for by the committee.
               
The committee wish to be advised by the people of the different townships in regard to the expediency of appointing places of deposit in their townships and also what points will be most convenient for that purpose.
                                                                                                
                                M. H. Eastman,
                                                                                                
                                Thos. Fletcher,
                                                                                                
                                W. B. Easley.
               
Little Rock, Aug. 30, 1861. 

Semi-Weekly Raleigh Register, September 7, 1861, p. 3, c. 3
                                                                                                                                
           For the Register.

Shameful Neglect—Who is to Blame?

                Mr. Editor:--We have a right, for the sake of our friends, to make public and special inquiry into the neglect which has followed some of our troops into Virginia.  The condition of the noble 6th Regiment State Troops, which fought at Manassas and has suffered much since, is matter of the deepest solicitude to those of its friends who know the facts.  . . .                  Is there not humanity enough in North Carolina, or in the Southern Confederacy, to remedy such a curse?  Will you tell the friends of that Regiment what to do?
                                                                                             
         Very Respectfully,                         A. M.
               
Sept. 2nd, 1861.
               
Our correspondent will perceive, from the communication of Surgeon General Johnson in another column, that measures have already been set on foot to extend aid to our soldiers in the field, and to provide for their wants during the approaching winter. . . . 
                                                                                                
                                For the Register.

General Military Hospital.

                The object in establishing a General Hospital in Richmond, or some suitable place in Virginia, is to relieve the wants and sufferings of the sick and wounded soldiers of the North Carolina troops in Virginia, "which may be found not sufficiently provided for under the rules of the War Department of the Confederate States." . . .
               
The articles most needed at present by our sick soldiers, are Blankets, Quilts, Shirts, Drawers, Mattress and Pillow-cases, Sheets, and Socks, Rice Flour, Sago, and some Money, to buy such articles as cannot be sent from a distance.
                                                                                                
                           Chas. E. Johnson,
                                                                                                
                           Surgeon General of N. C.  
All papers friendly to the cause will please copy, and urge upon the people the importance of this matter, and the necessity of promptly attending to it.

Natchez Daily Courier, September 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 2  
The committee appointed by the ladies of Baton Rouge, La., to procure blankets for the use of the army, reported 700 as the result of their explorations within the limits of that city--besides many quilts and comforters which have been contributed.
 

Natchez Daily Courier, September 17, 1861, p. 1, c. 1  
We learn that the Military Aid Society has shipped over 1000 lined blankets to the seat of war in Virginia, and that they have over one thousand yet on hand to line.  They will be sent off as soon as they are made ready.
    
           Although our people have been liberal--extremely so--in supplying the societies with blankets, there are still more wanted.  Bring them forth, and place comforts on your own beds in their stead.  We would suggest to the ladies that cotton batting can be obtained at Jackson; a most excellent and convenient article for making comforts.
 

Semi-Weekly Raleigh Register, September 18, 1861, p. 3, c. 2
                                                                                                
                                For the Register.

To the People of North Carolina.

                The General Military Hospital for taking care of the sick and wounded of the North Carolina troops will be established in Petersburg, Virginia, and will be ready for the accommodation of patients in a few weeks.
               
There will be required for the use of this Hospital, two hundred and fifty pair of sheets; two hundred and fifty pillow ticks, and as many pillow cases; two hundred and fifty pair of blankets; as many pair of drawers, and socks of wool and cotton, and two hundred and fifty shirts; two hundred and fifty towels, and any quantity of hard soap, such as is very much needed at this time in all the Regiments. . . .
                                                                                                
                                Charles E. Johnson,
                                                                                                
                                Surg. Gen'l N. C.

The Southern Watchman [Athens, Ga.], September 18, 1861, p. 3, c. 1  
[left edge cut off, but gives dimensions for hospital shirts, short bed gowns, cotton drawers, comforts (42x78), pillow sacks, mattress sacks--can get copy from original???]
 

Natchez Daily Courier, September 20, 1861, p. 1, c. 1  
Recipe for Coloring Blankets.  Make a strong solution of Red Oak Bark, put a table spoonful of Copperas in the solution, boil a few minutes and stir well.  Put your white blankets in the solution and boil them half an hour; take them out and soak them in weak ley then rinse them well in warm soap suds and hang out to dry.
    
           These directions if followed will give a most desirable [dye?] for an army blanket.
 

[Marshall] Texas Republican, September 21, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
We hope that every family in Harrison county will contribute every blanket they can spare to our noble, self sacrificing, brave volunteers.  Supply their places with comforts, and send in the blankets without delay.  Winter is nearly upon us, and our soldiers are stationed in rigorous latitudes, where they will need every blanket we can send them.  It will never do for those at home to be surrounded with every comfort, and our friends abroad, engaged in the defence of all that we hold dear, to be suffering.  Let us make them feel that our hearts are with them and the glorious cause which they are defending, and that all that we possess is at the service of our country.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, September 26, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

To the Merchants of Arkansas.

                We call attention to the subjoined call of Maj. Clark for clothing, and material.  Those who have articles of this kind for sale would do well to inform Maj. Clark of the number and their prices.  Our troops must be supplied, and those having these things for sale must furnish them.

Clothing for our Soldiers.

                                                                                                    A. Q. M's Office, Fort Smith, Ark.,      }
                                                                                                
    September 12th, 1861.                         }
               
It will require the combined efforts of all patriotic citizens in aid of the quarter master's department, to supply sufficient comfortable clothing to our gallant troops during the coming winter.  With the view of furnishing the troops on the Arkansas frontier, the merchants of the States are requested to inform this office, at an early day, of the quality, quantity and prices of such articles as they can supply as follows: . . .
               
Blanket Coats, . . . 
                Jeans, Blankets, . . .                                         
Contributions of any of the above named articles from our liberal citizens will be received in the general stock of clothing for the army, or forwarded to particular individuals.  The citizens of every town and village can appoint a receiver, who will receive, pack, mark and forward to this office their contributions.
                                                                
                                Geo. W. Clark,
                                                                           
                     Major A. Q. M.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, September 26, 1861, p. 3, c. 5

Clothing for the Soldiers of the Hot Spring
Rifle Company "E." 12th Regiment Ar-
kansas Volunteers.

                It is earnestly requested by the captains, lieutenants and privates of said county, that all who can do so should, at the earliest possible day, make up something like the following for their friends and relatives:
               
Two pair of pants, of heavy brown or gray mixed jeans, lined if though proper, with domestic.  One roundabout or jacket of the same material, lined throughout, with side and vest pockets, it should be long enough to come some four inches below the waistband of the pants and large enough to be worn over the vest or outside shirt.  One heavy vest of jeans, linsey or kersey, one overshirt of woolen or mixed goods; one or two pair of drawers, as the case may require, two pair of socks, one good blanket is advisable, one overcoat or a loose sack coat, or a hunting shirt with a belt.
                                                                                                
                E. C. Jones, Capt.,
                                                                
                                of Hot Spring Rifle Co., "E." 12th A. R. V.
               
P. S.—These goods can all be boxed up together with each man's name upon his goods and forwarded.  The proper information will be given in due time how and where they will be forwarded to.
                                                                                                                                
                E. C. J.                    

Southern Confederacy [Atlanta, Ga.], September 27, 1861, p. 2, c. 1-2

Ladies' Relief Society.

                                                                                                                        September 24th 1861.  
. . . Contents of boxes sent to "Hospital" were: . . .

               
36 blankets, 3 coverlets, 24 comforts, 2 bed ticks, 6 pillows, 20 pairs sheets, 29 pairs pillow cases, 2 bolster cases, 60 towels, 31 pairs drawers, 60 shirts, 36 bundles eatables, 2 bushels dried apples, 1 bag rags--old linen and cotton. . .  
                                                                                        
Mrs. W. F. Westmoreland,
                 
President.  
Caro. Yancey,

               
Assistant Secretary.

 Mobile Register and Advertiser, October 2, 1861, p. 2, c. 3 
               
Noteworthy.--Mrs. Tazwell Tanner, of Charlotte, N. C., whose husband is a worthy laboring man, being called on by a committee to receive any contributions in blankets or clothing she might feel able to give for our soldiers, promptly and cheerfully placed at the disposal of the committee every blanket in her possession--six in number--and insisted that they be accepted.--When advised that she was too liberal--that she had better keep a couple for her own use, she replied that she could make comforts and get along well enough without them--that the brave soldiers would need them and she was glad she enjoyed the privilege to contribute that much to their comfort.
 

The Southern Watchman [Athens, Ga.], October 2, 1861, p. 2, c. 1  
We were shown recently a lot of heavy woollen gloves, comforts, &c. fabricated by Misses Matthews, of Jackson county, for some of our brave volunteers in Virginia.  We had no idea that such articles could be gotten up here in such beautiful style.  They reflect much credit upon the taste, skill and patriotism of the young ladies, and will no doubt contribute much to the comfort of those for whom they were made.
 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, October 3, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
During the past two or three years, we have repeatedly urged urged [sic?] upon the farmers of Arkansas the importance of raising sheep.  We may estimate the sheep in Arkansas at 150,000, which, at an average of two pounds to the fleece, would give 300,000 pounds of wool.  The population of Arkansas requires, for blankets, clothing, etc., two and a half millions of pounds of wool annually.—If the blockade is ever broken, one of the leading imports will be wool and woolen goods.

Austin State Gazette, October 5, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
                                                                                               
Bastrop, Sept. 27, 1861.
Editor State Gazette:
    
           Sir--At a meeting held by the ladies of Bastrop county, on the 6th of August, they proceeded to organize an "Aid Society," for the benefit of our soldiers, during the war.
    
           The immediate object of the society was to procure thick clothing, blankets, wollen [sic] socks, &c., for Capt. Highsmith's company, which had left this county, to join Parson's regiment.  In the course of two weeks, we obtained a sufficient quantity of clothing to render them comfortable during the winter.

    
           The members of the society are not engaged in spinning yarn, knitting socks, collecting blankets, and making comfortables, to be sent to our soldiers, wherever they may be needed.  Application has been made to the Governor, for material from the Penitentiary, of which, of obtained, we intend to manufacture winter clothing for the destitute, thereby hoping to alleviate to some degree, the hardships incident to a soldier's life.

    
           MISS. L. SCOTT,    }  Corresponding Committee.
    
           MRS. S. J. ORGAIN}
 

The Southern Watchman [Athens, Ga.], October 9, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
               
Soldier's Aid Society.--The following report speaks volumes in favor of the ladies of Clarke county:
               
Quarterly Report of the Soldier's Aid Society of Clarke county.
No. of coats                          301                          Canteen covers                    160
               
pants,                     297                          Comforters                              6
               
shirts,                     794                          Havelocks                             60
               
draws,                    621                          Extra garments,                     65
               
socks,                     348                          Total                                 2,595
    
           The Society takes this opportunity to thank the Ladies of Watkinsville for their cheerful assistance in making the above mentioned articles.
    
           Sept. 30, 1861.                                                                       Susan A. Lipscomb, Sec.
   

Tennessee Baptist, October 12, 1861, p. 4, c. 2
                                                                                                         
Cumberland Ford, Ky., Oct. 3, 1861.
               
Our Battalion left Knoxville in high spirits, knowing as soon as Kentucky's green fields lay before them, that active service would drive away their animosities, and unite them as a band of brothers. . . About 18 miles from here, the news reached us that the Southern troops that preceded us, had possession of Barbersville.  We hurried on, and that night we slept for the first night in our lives beneath the roofs of our enemies.  Then commenced a scene of plunder.  In every direction lay trampled under foot, bed-quilts, sheets, beds, female articles of dress, and every thing which the soldier considered valueless, or which he could not conveniently carry.  Homes of families that had hitherto been the pride of its inmates were given to destruction, by the hands of—I blush to say it—Tennessee Soldiers.  Every nook and corner was ransacked, and its precious things hid beneath the folds of the soldier's uniform.  It was indeed a distressing scene of robbery.  Even the jewelry which had in former times adorned the fairest of that village, became the spoil of those mercenary soldiers in our army that know not the true spirit of patriotism, and who are destitute of every honorable principle.  The place was left in ruins, some houses not retaining any thing in them but the naked beds.  All else were carried off, or utterly ruined by the tramp of the robber soldier.
               
I too took from the house of a Captain in Lincoln's army, two poetical works and a blanket.  These I considered contraband articles of war, since they belonged to a Captain of Lincoln.  But I ruined nothing, and saved all that I could. . . .
                                                                               
Marion.

[Marshall] Texas Republican, October 12, 1861, p. 1, c. 4

To the People of Texas.

                                                                                                                Adjutant General's Office,
                                                                                                
                Austin, September 4, 1861.
               
The Secretary of War of the Confederate States, has requested the State Executive to have made up, at an early day, a large quantity of Woolen Clothing, to supply the wants of the army, to be charged to the Confederate Government.  The Medical Purveyor has also asked aid from the Executive on a plan to procure blankets for the sick and wounded of the army.  he suggests very wisely that almost every family, with little or no inconvenience to itself, can contribute a blanket or comfortable to this Department.  Warmly approving these suggestions, the Executive issued his address of the 31st ult., inviting the formation in every county in the State, of a Society or Committee to solicit and receive heavy clothing, blankets, comfortables, and other articles which will be needed by our army during the coming winter.  The military stores thus furnished, will be paid for in the bonds of the Confederate States.  To effectuate this plan, depots will be established at central points, under the superintendence of the following agents, viz: . . . 
               
To give vigor, efficiency, and life to this plan the great body of our citizens must lend to it their persevering and active labors.  No appeal can be necessary to arouse them to early and efficient action, to prevent a frequent recurrence among the brave youth whom we have sent from our mild climate, to Virginia and Missouri, of the horrors of Valley Forge.  No time should be lost.  Winter will soon be upon them.
                                                                
                                Wm. Byrd, Adjutant General.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, October 17, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

Patriotic Ladies.

                When the aged matron, who has passed her three score years, takes hold of the disstaff [sic] and makes clothes and jeans for the soldiers, Abraham Lincoln may never expect to subdue the South.  Here the ladies of South Arkansas are at work—some knitting socks and making jeans, and 150 have joined into a society, the Soldier's Aid Society, in Camden; that the sons and brothers of our county may never want for warm clothing or blankets.  We will send them our blankets most willingly—we can make plenty of comforts for our homes. . . . 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, October 24, 1861, p. 2, c. 3
               
To one who has not attempted the calculation, the value of the voluntary contributions to the army, made by the patriotic women of Arkansas, would almost exceed belief.  In a late number of the Chicot Press is a list of one lot sent to the Chicot Rangers.  The list is half a column long.  It enumerates blankets, overcoats, coats, pants, drawers, shirts and various other articles.  The whole value must be several thousand dollars.  Going home one evening last week, we met five wagons heavily laden with clothing for the volunteers.  These were from the southern part of the State.  Every county has contributed more or less and each has nobly done its duty.  The value of the articles sent from Pulaski county has been estimated at $18,000.  The goods already sent could not be bought with a quarter of a million of dollars.—Here and elsewhere, the patriotic women have taken the blankets from their beds and sent them to the soldiers.  In Johnson county, the merchants offered premiums to the young ladies who made the best or most jeans, and other woolen goods, and the result was that large quantities of excellent goods were brought in, made up and sent to the soldiery.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, October 24, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

Letter from Capt. Holmes.

                                                                                                Camp Hardee, Pitman's Ferry,      }
                                                                                                
                October 14th, 1861.     }
Men and Women of Dallas County—
               
If anything could add to the pleasure and satisfaction of this hour, it would be to know that you were gazing upon the scene that greets my eyes.  It would need no words of grateful and heartfelt acknowledgment from me for your prompt, energetic and efficient aid in behalf of the gallant and brave boys of my command, could you see them as I do, now neatly and comfortably clad; behold their smiling, happy faces; and hear them greet each other with the oft-repeated, "God bless the good people of Dallas county."  But I have just returned from a visit among you and my heart tells me that I must thank you.  No one knows better than myself how much you have labored, nor how willingly and cheerfully you have given your money to aid in clothing these honorable, noble hearted, yet half naked soldiers.  To this end, I have seen the mothers and daughters of Dallas, bending over their work, day after day, night after night; yes, week after week.  I have seen mothers strip the soft, warm blankets from their beds and with their blessings send them as covering to their absent soldier husbands and sons.  . . .
               
From yours most truly,
                                                                                                
                                Wm. T. M. Holmes,
                                
                                                                Company A, Col. Borland's Rg't of Mt. Vol.

Natchez Daily Courier, November 5, 1861, p. 1, c. 3
                                               
Have you a Spare Blanket for a Soldier?

There are now about forty volunteers to quarters at the Marine Hospital in this city, and others are joining the force daily.  It is expected that on Saturday next those recruits and others who are daily swelling their ranks, will be sufficient in numbers to form two more companies from Natchez and Adams County.  At all events, one full company will be formed out of these volunteers, and all who sign the rolls will go, and are pledged to serve, whether as officers or privates.  All join on an equal footing.  Those who are most active in getting up these companies, or this company, are Capt. Henry Dougherty, proprietor of Dougherty's Hotel, Under the Hill, Lieut. Oscar, formerly an officer of Artillery in the Prussian service, Gen. W. W. W. Wood and Mr. C. Fred. Thomas, an ex-officer of the ancient Fencibles, who have enrolled their names among the volunteers.  These gentlemen represent to us that Blankets are much needed for the recruits now mustered in, and those about to join, and they would feel obliged for a donation of blankets--Have you reader, a spare blanket for a soldier? 

Albany [Ga.] Patriot, November 14, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
               
To the Ladies of the different Societies, and Also to the Ladies of Dougherty County, Generally.
I have been requested by Capt. W. J. Lawton to set before you the wants of his Company, and not having the time and convenience to visit you at your homes, therefore take this method of informing you that I am authorized by Capt. Lawton to procure the materials for making up 85 comforters for his men.  Blankets are too short and costly, and do not cover the wants of the soldiers--hence it was determined to have comforters made in their stead.--It was thought by us that osnaburgs would be the best material for making them, but I am informed through the ladies that calico is best.  It shall therefore be left with them to choose the best goods for the purpose.  Now a comforter should be six feet in length, and two breadths in width, less than that will not answer.  Each and every lady wishing to engage in this noble work can procure the materials in Albany, having them charged to Capt. W. J. Lawton, who has given me the assurance that he will settle all such claims.  It is needless for me to say more on the subject, for I feel assured that the [fold] fact that these things are absolutely wanted by the brave men who are enduring every thing for the protection of our homes and firesides, will be sufficient to engage the patriotic needle of every lady in Doughterty county. 
                                                                                                           
D. F. Bailey. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, November 21, 1861, p. 3, c. 6

                                                                                                Holly Springs, Dallas Co., Ark.,                }
                                                                                                
                October 28th, 1861.                 }
Editor True Democrat:
               
In order that the devotion of the citizens of Holly Springs and vicinity to the cause of liberty and right, may be more generally known, and particularly of the ladies, I send you a list of clothing, with the request that you give it a place in your paper.  All the clothing described has been presented without charge, and has been forwarded to Capt. E. P. Chandler's company, 12th Arkansas regiment, and consists of the following articles, viz:  8 overcoats, 66 jean coats, 86 pairs jeans pants, 35 pairs linsey drawers, 44 pairs cotton drawers, 42 jeans vests, 12 knit shirts, 56 linsey and flannel shirts, 59 hickory shirts, 34 home knit comforts for the neck, 159 pairs socks, 42 pairs gloves, knit by the ladies, 44 blankets, mostly home made, and 12 coverlets.
               
Almost all of the above articles have been spun, wove and made by the fair hands of the wives, mothers, sisters and sweethearts of those who have enlisted in said company.  Can a people so united and devoted ever be conquered?  Never, while the God of justice continues to rule among the inhabitants of the earth.
                                                                
                                Yours, etc.,
                                                                                             
                Thomas Peterson. 

Natchez Daily Courier, November 27, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
... And so far from the "stores being left idly stored," they are being, and have been for months, converted into clothing as rapidly as the busy fingers and patriotic hearts of the ladies of the Confederate Sewing Society can hasten them.

    
           They have already lined more than 1000 blankets, and have made 800 pairs of pants, and are now working all day and far into the night, to finish the compliment.  And yet, when done, the brigade, upwards of 2,000 men, will still not have a sufficiency of Clothing. 

[Marshall] Texas Republican, November 30, 1861, 1, c. 2
               
The ladies of Clarksville, Tennessee, presented the Texas Regiment a timely gift, while at that place.  Nearly all the soldiers were supplied with comfortable woolen gloves, and a number with good blankets.
 

[Marshall] Texas Republican, December 7, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

Volunteer Aid Society.

                The Ladies of Harrison County, feeling a deep interest in the welfare of their country in her present troubles, and desiring to contribute something to the relief and comfort of the soldiers, and aid in the glorious cause for which they are struggling, have formed themselves into an association having for its object the comfort of the well and relief of the sick from our county, in the service of the Confederate States of America.
. . . 
               
The following is a list of articles which will be useful:
               
Old linen and cotton cloth, . . . coverlets, . . . country or homemade blankets and counterpanes;  . .
.
               
By order of Committee,
                                                                                                
                                M. A. Peete, Secretary.  

Tennessee Baptist, December 7, 1861, p. 4, c. 2

Cheap Blankets.

                Newspaper blankets are coming into vogue.  They are no joke.  A correspondent of one of our exchanges thus refers to the matter.
               
"I have recently heard much about the value of newspapers as a substitute for blankets, and have considered the statement to be apocryphal.  But last evening I was induced to make the experiment.  I took four full-sized newspapers and pasted them together by the edges, making one large sheet the size of a blanket.  I then removed the blankets from my bed, and placed the newspaper sheet between the one remaining blanket, and the counterpane.  The result was a comfortable night's sleep, without any feeling of cold.  I pledge my word to you, gentlemen, that this is literally true; and my object in making the communication is, that through the medium of your paper, the fact may be generally circulated; for it is no trifling matter to the poor to know that for an outlay of a few pennies they can supply themselves with comfortable bed coverings [rest obscured].

1862 

Weekly Columbus [GA] Enquirer, January 7, 1862, p. 3, c. 7

Cotton Batting
For Quilts and Comforts.

                Our people are called upon to send their Blankets to the Soldiers.  Quilts and Comforts are good substitutes.  The Eagle Company are now manufacturing the Cotton Batting required in making them.
               
They are also making Knitting Cotton, Sewing Thread, &c, &c, of which can be found at the stores of the merchants in the city.
                                                                                                               
J. Rhodes Brone, Agts.  

Charleston Mercury, January 16, 1862, p. 4, c. 5
               
Moss Blankets.--A Wilmington N. C. correspondent says:  I notice an important invention, by means of which our soldiers are being shielded from the cold and dampness of tent life.--Blankets are being made of the moss which is to be found in such immense quantities around the trees in many portions of the South.  Yesterday six hundred of these blankets passed through this city.  They are thick and as warm as any blanket.  Here then is another great instance of the inventive genius of our sunny South.  We rob the trees of their clothing rather than that our brave boys shall suffer for lack of raiment.
 

Savannah [GA] Republican, January 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
We find the following graceful acknowledgment of Savannah liberality in the Nashville papers:
               
Mrs. Frances B. Fogg and the ladies of the Tennessee Clothing and Blanket Association, present their most grateful acknowledgment to the merchants of Savannah, Georgia, for the donation of one hundred and seventy dollars, and also to Mr. Hodgson, of the same city, for the handsome New Year's gift of a large bale of cotton containing 500 lbs., for the manufacture of blankets for the destitute soldiers of the Southern Army.  A new enterprise, which, with the aid and support thus extended to us by noble Georgia, cannot fail to succeed.
                                                                                                               
M. R. Fogg, President.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, January 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Everybody who has been "down south," has noticed the long moss pendent on the trees in that section.  The negroes and others have heretofore made carpets and saddle blankets of it, but lately, some enterprising men have gone to manufacturing it, with wool or cotton, into blankets for the soldiers.  Six hundred of these blankets were sent to an Alabama regiment, and found soft, thick and warm. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, February 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Contributions to the soldiers left at Clements & Willett's:

To the Weaver Artillery.

                [list, including 2 prs. mackinaw blankets] 

Southern Confederacy [Atlanta, Ga.], March 4, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

The Ladies!  The Ladies!

                Are earnestly requested to meet every day at the City Hall to make comforts for the sick soldiers.  Come with thimbles, needles and a strong will.  Come!  Come! 

Charleston Mercury, March 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
The young ladies of Wesleyan Female College, at Macon, have stripped their beds of twenty-nine blankets to present to the soldiers. 

[Marshall] Texas Republican, March 8, 1862, p. 3, c. 2
               
Blankets for the Soldiers.—The committee appointed to equip volunteers from this county publish an appeal to the citizens for blankets.  There are no longer any for sale in the country.  The only resort now is to solicit donations from the heads of families, and if this appeal fails, the soldiers must do without.  Under these circumstances, is there a man in Harrison county who has not sufficient patriotism to give the last blanket to our noble volunteers who are sacrificing ease and comfort, and risking health and life, for the defence of our firesides?  If there be any such, we hope their wives will strip the blankets from the beds and send them to the committee.  It will be a reproach hereafter for blankets to be found in our homes, when it is known they are wanted by the soldiers.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, March 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
                                                                                                
                Little Rock, March 15th, 1862.
Rev. Mr. Welch—
               
Dear Sir:  Permit me to tender the thanks of my company for your prompt action in supplying them with the requisite number of blankets, and express our high appreciation of these patriotic ladies and citizens of Little Rock, so ready and willing to sacrifice their own comfort to promote that of the volunteer.
               
This valuable donation will ever be gratefully remembered by us, and I trust may be the means of securing our health and nerving our arms in defense of our rights, honor and independence.
                                                                                                                Yours very respectfully,
                                                                                                
                Read Fletcher,
                                                                                                
                Capt. "Pine Bluff Rebels." 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, March 27, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
               
What a Knapsack Should Contain.—The official regulations in Louisiana enumerate as follows:  One blanket, one shirt, one pair of drawers, one undershirt, three pair of socks, one pair of shoes, one towel, one tin cup, one tin pan or plate, one knife and fork, one cake of soap, one handkerchief, a piece of oil cloth to put under the blanket, and nothing else. . . .   

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, April 3, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
Hospitals.—Four or five of the largest and most airy buildings in the city are being fitted up as hospitals.  For the present the sufferers are compelled to lie on the floors, and there is a want of mattrasses and comforters.  Persons in the city and country having such things which they can possibly spare, would show kindness and patriotism by sending them to one of the hospitals.  Farmers who can spare a few chickens or product of their gardens, will be paid for them if they will bring them in, and be thanked to boot.
                We hope the persons in charge, aided by our citizens, will soon have the sick soldiers comfortably situated.

Savannah [GA] Republican, May 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Augusta Auction Sale.
By W. B. Griffin.
Package Sale of
Military Goods
Direct Importation
By the Steamship Nashville.

                Tuesday, 14th of May instant, in store, commencing at 10 o'clock, will be sold, a large and valuable assortment of Military Goods, direct importation, as follows: . .
               
        Grey Blankets
               
        White Blankets . .
               
        A large invoice of India Rubber Goods, consisting of Coats, Pants, Leggings, Blankets, &c.      

 Savannah [GA] Republican, June 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale at Auction of
4,731 Packages
English Goods,
Direct from London, and put up expressly for this Market,
By R. A. Pringle,
Jas. H. Taylor, Auctioneer.

               
On Wednesday morning, June 11, at 187 Meeting Street, commencing at 10 o'clock.
Groceries.
. . .                                                                          
Dry Goods.

46 pair Blankets
100 Coverlids
 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, August 6, 1862, p. 1, c. 6-7

To the Ladies.

                                                                                Office, Medical Director, Trans Miss. Dist.,                }
                                                                
                                Little Rock, July 30th, 1862.                       }
               
To promote the recovery of sick soldiers in Hospitals, they must have better and more cleanly bed clothing than the blankets used by them in camp.  With this view, the undersigned earnestly solicits the ladies, every where throughout the district, to manufacture and send to Dr. Silverberg, Medical Purveyor at this place, the largest quantity possible, of Cotton Goods, suitable for Comforts and Sheets, the former to be dyed, as white is not a proper color.  Reasonable prices will be paid promptly on delivery.
                                                                                                
                                James M. Keller,
               
Aug. 6.                                                                                                             Medical Director.

Savannah [GA] Republican, August 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Charleston Auction Sale.
English
Blankets!
By R. A. Pringle, 137 Meeting-St.
James H. Taylor, Auctioneer.
62 Bales
Damaged English Grey Blankets
Will be sold on
Wednesday, August 20,

Commencing at 10 o'clock a.m.

Charleston Mercury, August 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
Seizure of a Treasonable Bed Quilt.--The Baltimore Sun publishes this item:
               
Yesterday afternoon Deputy Marshal Lyon seized, at a house on Hoffman-street, a magnificently wrought bed quilt, which, it is alleged, was intended as a present for Jeff. Davis.  It is made of silk, and in the centre is a large Confederate flag, with a white cross in the centre of the blue ground.  In the cross was embroidered "Jefferson Davis, President of the Southern Confederacy."  On other portions of the flag were the names of the Confederate Cabinet officers and of some of the principal Generals.  It was taken to the Marshal's office, and will be turned over to Gen. Wool. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, August 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

To the People of the Trans-Mississippi
Department, composed of the States
of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana and
Texas.

                At no period since the commencement of the contest in which we are now engaged, has there existed a more pressing necessity for active and zealous co-operation on the part of the people of these States with the military authorities, than at the present moment.  The partial occupation of the Mississippi River Line by our enemies has so far impeded communication with the other States of the Confederacy, as to compel those charged with the duty of providing for her wants of our army, to seek for and develop new sources of supply.  Our army is in urgent need of blankets and clothing of every description, to enable them to withstand the rigor of the approaching winter, as well as to successfully oppose the invaders of our soil, and they can be furnished with but little from the other side of the Mississippi, or by the few manufactories now established in these States.
               
In this emergency, Maj. Gen'l T. H. Holmes commanding in this Department, relying confidently on the patriotism of the people, directs me to make an appeal to them for that assistance which all can afford to give without much individual inconvenience, and which, if promptly furnished, will greatly promote the success of our army.  Every family throughout this Department, possessed of a spinning wheel and a loom, is requested to manufacture as large a quantity of cloth (both woolen and cotton) as the raw material at its command will permit.  Those who have no facilities for spinning or weaving, may assist in the good work by making up shirts, drawers, pantaloons, coats and overcoats, and by knitting stockings, making hats or caps, and shoes, while those who have looms adapted to the purpose can furnish blankets, or some other article answering the same object. . . .
                                                                                                
                                Jno. D. Adams,
                                                               
                                Capt. and Acting Chief Quartermaster,
                                                                                                
                Trans-Mississippi District.
               
Papers throughout the country will please copy, and call public attention to this appeal.

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, August 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
Keep It Before the People.—That General Holmes desires all the cloth suitable for Clothing for soldiers; all the socks, blankets and bed clothes; and all of the hats, shoes and boots which can possibly be made.  The highest prices will be paid.  Let everything the army needs be furnished. 

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, August 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
To the People of the Trans-Mississippi Department, Composed of the States of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.—At no period since the commencement of the contest in which we are now engaged, has there existed a more pressing necessity for active and zealous co-operation on the part of the people of these States with the military authorities, than at the present moment.  The partial occupation of the Missouri River Line by our enemies has so far impeded communication with the other States of the Confederacy, as to compel those charged with the duty of providing for the wants of our army, to seek for and develop new sources of supply.  Our army is in urgent need of blankets and clothing of every description, to enable them to withstand the rigor of the approaching winter, as well as to successfully oppose the invaders of our soil, and they can be furnished with but little from the other side of the Mississippi, or by the few manufactories now established in these States.
               
In this emergency, Maj-Gen. T. H. Holmes, commanding on this Department, relying confidently on the patriotism of the people, directs me to make an appeal to them for that assistance which all can afford to give without much individual inconvenience, and which, if promptly furnished, will greatly promote the success of our army.  Every family throughout this Department, possessed of a spinning wheel and a loom, is requested to manufacture as large a quantity of cloth (both woolen and cotton) as the raw material at its command will permit.  Those who have no facilities for spinning or weaving, may assist in the good work by making up shirts, drawers, pantaloons, coats and overcoats, and by knitting stockings, making hats or caps, and shoes; while those who have looms adapted to the purpose, can furnish blankets or some other article answering the same purpose. . . .
                                                                                                
                                Jno. D. Adams,
                                                                
                                Capt. and acting Chief Quartermaster,
                                                                                                
                Trans-Mississippi District.
               
Papers throughout the country will please copy, and call public attention to this appeal.

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, August 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 6
                                                                                                
                From the Memphis Union Appeal.
               
Late from Helena.—Return of General Hovey's Expedition.
                                                                                                
                Helena, August 18.
               
Friend Sawyer:  Gen. Hovey's command (about 5000) returned from Clarendon this morning—having lost two men after their arrival there, and one killed and two wounded on the second day; third day, one killed and two wounded, and also two killed by bushwackers, returning; and two died of congestive chills.  Captured a large amount of property, including twelve dozen good blankets and fifteen suits United States clothing, at a house about twenty-five miles from Helena. . . . 
                                                                                                
                                "Mac."

 Savannah [GA] Republican, September 3, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
"Blankets for the Rebels."—Under this head, the New York Tribune, of the 12th inst., editorially says:
               
A gentleman who has recently arrived from Mobile states that there is not a single carpet to be found in any house in that city, every one having been given up last winter to be used as blankets by the army.  The rebels began it, and the Unionists—of whom our informant insists here still remain a considerable number—followed suit, because they feared their omission to do so would lead to their denunciation as Northern sympathizers and traitors.  The South is now destitute of blankets, and of any substitute.  Under these circumstances, considerable sums of money have been sent to England to buy blankets for the army, with orders to ship them to Charleston.  Cannot this traitorous next be broken up altogether, or else the blockade be rendered what it never yet has been—thoroughly effective?
 

Savannah [GA] Republican, September 6, 1862, p. 1, c. 2

Covering for the Sick Soldiers.

                We are in receipt of a letter from the Surgeon of the Guyton Hospital, to which all our convalescing soldiers are sent, stating the fact that the patients are wholly unprovided with blankets, comforts and other covering to protect them against the approaching cool weather.  The government cannot purchase blankets on any terms, and it rests with private citizens to prevent the suffering that must surely ensue without such aid.  Will not our citizens take a review of their bed clothing, and send us what they can possibly spare?  Anything that will keep out the cold will answer, and we hope to receive a prompt response to the appeal, both from city and country.  The inmates of the hospital have relatives and friends all over the State, who should do what they can for their comfort.  All packages sent to this office will be promptly forwarded. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, September 17, 1862, p. 1, c. 7

Special Notice.
To Contractors and others engaged in
furnishing Army Clothing.

                                                                                                Office, Chief Quartermaster,                      }
                                                                
                                Trans-Miss. Dist., Little Rock, Ark.,          }
                                                                                                
                September 9th, 1862.                }
               
Maj. Jno. D. Burton, A. Q. M., C. S. A., having been placed in charge of the Bureau of army clothing in this military district, by the General Commanding, all communications having reference to the supply, or manufacture of materials required for army clothing, or of articles ready-made, will hereafter be addressed to him at this place.  It is desirable that he should be furnished with early and accurate information regarding the location and working capacity of tan-yards, the amount and kinds of cloth, shoes, blankets, etc., which can be produced within the ensuing two months in different sections of the military department, and generally, all details which will assist him in securing, at the earliest possible period, an ample supply of clothing for the troops now in the field.  Communications upon these subjects are earnestly solicited by him, and will receive careful attention.
                                                                                                
                Jno. D. Adams, Capt. and
               
Sept. 10, '62.                                                                                          Acting Chief Q. M.

 Austin State Gazette, September 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

 To the People of the Trans-Mississippi Department, Composed of
the States of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.

                At no period since the commencement of the contest in which we are now engaged, has there existed a more pressing necessity for active and zealous cooperation on the part of the people of these States with the military authorities, than at the present moment.  The partial occupation of the Mississippi River Line by our enemies has so far impeded communication with the other States of the Confederacy, as to compel those charged with the duty of providing for the wants of our army, to seek for and develop new sources of supply.  Our army is in urgent need of blankets and clothing of every description, to enable them to withstand the rigor of the approaching winter, as well as to successfully oppose the invades of our soil, and they can be furnished with but little from the other side of the Mississippi, or by the few manufactories now established in these States.
    
           In this emergency, Maj-Gen'l T. H. Holmes, commanding in this Department, relying confidently on the patriotism of the people, directs me to make an appeal to them for that assistance which all can afford to give without much individual inconvenience, and which, if promptly furnished, will greatly promote the success of our army.  Every family throughout this Department, possessed of a spinning wheel and loom, is requested to manufacture as large a quantity of cloth (both woolen and cotton) as the raw material at its command will permit.  Those who have no facilities for spinning or weaving, may assist in the good work by making up shirts, drawers, pantaloons, coats and overcoats, and by knitting stockings, making hats or caps, and shoes; while those who have looms adapted to the purpose, can furnish blankets, or some other article answering the same object.
    
           The clerk of each county in the States named is required, either to take charge of, or appoint some suitable person to receive and forward all goods manufactured for army purposes, in the county in which he resides, to the nearest Post Quartermaster of the Confederate States Army, who will be furnished with funds to pay for the same on delivery, with cost of transportation added.  For his services, the agent who may attend to the collection and forwarding of these goods, will be allowed a reasonable compensation by the Post Quartermaster to whom he delivers them.  No limit will be placed on the prices of the articles thus furnished--the General commanding having confidence that a patriotic people will not extort upon their government in its hour of need.  The Post Quartermasters who receive the supplies in the way indicated, are requested to forward them to these headquarters without delay, and, as far as possible, to keep this office advised of the amount of clothing being made in their vicinity for the army.
    
           Merchants in these States who have for sale clothing suitable for army purposes, are requested to furnish immediately, to the nearest Post Quartermaster, a memorandum invoice of the articles, with prices annexed, to assist him in making purchases for the Quartermaster's Department.  Authorized purchasing agents are also abroad in various localities, and it is expected that the people will aid them in their efforts to procure supplies, by advising them as to the places where stored.
    
           The Major General commanding does not deem it necessary to do more than inform the people of this Department regarding the necessities of the troops under his command, and suggest a plan by which they can be promptly and comfortably clad.  He feels assured that this appeal will suffice to put in operation every spinning wheel and loom throughout the limits of the Department, and that neighbor will vie with neighbor, and community with community, in praiseworthy efforts to furnish clothing for the army.
                                                                                                                          
JNO. D. Adams,
 
                                                                              Capt. and Acting Chief Quartermaster,
                                                                                                     Tra
ns Mississippi District,                                                         Papers throughout the country will please copy,
                                                               
and call public attention to this appeal.
                                                                                                               
[True Democrat, Ark.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, September 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
Blankets and Clothing for the Soldiers.—Imitating the self-sacrificing spirit of the Roman matrons who stripped themselves of their dearly prized jewels, and cast them into the public treasury, when the exigencies of their country required such aid, the ladies of this city have nobly resolved to surrender, for the use of the brave defenders of our homes and liberties, not merely articles of ornament, but such as have hitherto been regarded as indispensably necessary to secure domestic comfort.  Not satisfied with simply devoting their time and energies to the task of fabricating clothing for the troops now in the field, they have determined to take up the fine carpets covering the floors of their dwellings, convert them into blankets and distribute them among the soldiers, who will, ere long, require such protection against the piercing winds of the winter season.
               
Will not the ladies throughout this State, Louisiana and Texas, emulate the example of their sisters of Little Rock?  We are sure they will do so with alacrity, for women have ever been found capable of performing acts of self-devotion to the cause of God, of her native land, or of her family.  Feeling assured that they will, one and all, answer promptly the demand now being made for clothing and blankets for the army, we have no appeal to make to their generosity or their patriotism, but will rest content with stating that the contributions of each neighborhood should be carefully packed together and forwarded to this city, to care of Maj. Jno. B. Burton, Chief of Army Clothing, Bureau of the Trans-Mississippi Department.

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, September 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
|                Make the Soldier Comfortable.—Major Gen. Holmes has made known to our people generally, and to the ladies particularly, the fact that, if a supply is not gotten up at home, many of our soldiers will lack blankets to make them comfortable and preserve their health, during the approaching winter.  The ladies here responded promptly and patriotically, many of them giving the last carpet they have to be made into substitutes for blankets for the purpose.
               
We feel confident that the call will be cheerfully and fully responded to by the ladies west of the Mississippi, to whom it is addressed.
               
All contributions of blankets, or substitutes for blankets, or clothes, will be forwarded to Maj. Jno. B. Burton, Chief of the Clothing Bureau, Trans-Mississippi Department.

Savannah [GA] Republican, October 7, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Clothing the Army.

. . . There is a corresponding obligation on the part of the citizen to do a part toward the relief of the army, and that part is the full measure of his ability, even should it be attended with self sacrifice and reduce the number of comforts around him.  In his quiet and peaceful home he should think of the poor soldier while braving the storms and plodding over the snow-clad mountains of Virginia to defend us from the grasp of the oppressor.  It is no time for selfishness.  Every man that has a blanket should send it to the soldiers.  In this genial climate we can readily save ourselves from suffering with cotton comforts and other means of command.  Every man who has a wool mattress should spare it to the government, and resort to cotton and moss, which are abundant.  There are thousands of light half-worn carpets that might be cut into blankets 6 ½ feet by 5, and sent to the army.  And then, again, insignificant as it may appear, there is an abundance of warm winter clothing, already made up, stored away in our closets and wardrobes, very much of which could be spared without any serious inconvenience to the owner.  Let all these things be brought forward from their hiding places and forwarded to some convenient point to be shipped forthwith to the army.  Coarse cotton socks are also in great demand, and the women of Georgia, by an effort, could supply every soldier from the State with two or three pairs before the close of the year. . . 

Savannah [GA] Republican, October 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 1 
               
Noble Contributions.—As a specimen of the right spirit to animate the Southern people at the present crisis, we would mention two instances of liberality that have come to our notice, with the hope that the parties will forgive us for the liberty we take with their names:
               
Messrs. W. H. Wiltberger & Co., the worthy and public-spirited proprietors of the Pulaski House, called on us yesterday, through a member of their firm, and offered the entire stock of carpets of their establishment, to be converted into covering for the soldiers.  Some idea of the munificence of the donation may be formed when we state that it comprises the carpeting of one hundred and twenty rooms, and when cut up will make over five hundred comfortable and good sized blankets.
               
The second is not less commendable.  Our old friend, Mr. S. Z. Murphey, the faithful Superintendent of Union Society's farm at Bethesda, and a man of very moderate means, called on me Saturday and left $50 as his contribution to the needy soldiers.
               
If there are many such men in the country, there will soon be no needy soldiers.
 

Savannah [GA] Republican, October 8, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
                                                                                               
Thomasville, Thomas Co., Ga.,
                                                                                               
October 4th, 1862.
               
Mr. Editor:  The earnest appeal of your correspondent, "P.W.A." finds immediate response in the hearts of thousands. . . Meanwhile let government supply us at home, through the proper officers, with cotton cards, and warp (No.6), and our ladies will shortly furnish an excellent article of cotton blankets; and warp of finer texture, for clothing, and our people will exchange, and give cloth already in their looms, rather than keep our men unclothed while weaving more.  Cloth for com-[illegible] must be furnished by government; [illegible] cotton and make the quilts.  The people are ready, only let the government officers act with them, and furnish what they cannot obtain, and the means of transportation, and Georgia and Florida will both proudly and promptly come to the rescue.  We are confident this can be accomplished, with proper effort, and let all begin the work, as you suggest, Mr. Editor, AT ONCE.     J.M.F.
 

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, October 11, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Clothing the Soldiers.—As far as we have been able to learn, the call of Gen. Holms on the people for clothing, blankets, and other things necessary to the comfort of the army, has been, and is being, well and promptly responded to by all.—especially by the women of the country.
               
The ladies of Little Rock, according to their habit from the commencement of the war, and with their well-known zeal, have been actively and efficiently engaged in preparing clothing, blankets, and such other things as they can procure, to enable our soldiers to stand the rigors of winter in a more northern clime.  To that end carpets have been converted into blankets, and the cloths, manufactured on home looms, made into clothing. . . . 

Savannah [GA] Republican, October 14, 1862, p. 1, c. 2

Covering for the Soldiers—A Lady's Suggestion.

                We take great pleasure in giving publicity to the following proposition from a patriotic, whole-souled woman of Georgia.  Let those to whom it is more especially addressed respond to the call.  Either party may avail themselves of our services whenever they may be useful:
                                                                                                     
Waresboro', Ga., Oct. 8th, 1862.
               
Mr. Editor:  You who have appealed to eloquently in behalf of our noble defenders, will not refuse us sufficient space to put in a petition for them.
               
Our tailors, and contractors for clothing for the army, must have many small scraps—remnants of cloth which are useless to them—which might be made into comforts for our soldiers in Virginia.  A little labor might accomplish much good; if only a few were benefited, it will be a pleasing reflection that we have "done what we could."
               
A single quilt, comfort or blanket, from each woman in the Confederacy would furnish our army and hospitals.
               
Who, after reading "P. W. A.'s" appeal to us last week, could hesitate to lend a helping hand to our dear defenders?  Something must be done—and done quickly.
               
Will not our cotton factories aid us a little?  Their most inferior fabric would make excellent comforts.
               
I shall be happy to receipt to the "Republican" for any material which may be left at that office, engaging with the assistance of my lady friends to return the comforts as soon as they can be finished, where busy fingers and willing hearts work together.  They may be placed at the disposal of the donors, or the "Republican," to be sent where it is deemed they are most needed.                          Mrs. C.W.S.
 

Savannah [GA] Republican, October 14, 1862, p. 1, c. 2

Clothing and Shoes for the Army.

                The Press cannot too often urge this subject on the minds and hearts of their readers.  We therefore copy and adopt an eloquent appeal from the Richmond Dispatch.  It says:
               
We cannot avoid again recurring to this subject.  It is the most important one that can at present engage the attention, not only of Congress and the War Department, but of the whole country.  If our troops can be properly clad, properly fed, and properly clothed, we may defy the enemy to do his worst.  For the article of food we learn that ample provision has been made.  For the article of shoes we observe that Congress has passed a law to organize a corps of 2,000 shoemakers for the public service.  They are enough, if it be possible to procure leather, which we believe it is.  It is here, especially, that the patriotism of the men and women of the country might come in as a powerful aid to the government.  Let everybody who has a scrap of leather that can by exercising the most severe self-denial, devote it to the service of the country.  Let nobody who has leather part with it to anybody but an agent of the government.  Let everybody who has no leather, but has money, contribute as much as can be spared by any possible means, to purchase leather.  Let it be bought if possible wherever it exists, even from speculators, at any price however exorbitant.  Send all the old shoes you may have and can spare, to be half-soled for the troops.  Rake and scrape together every scrap of leather you can possibly lay your hands on for this holy purpose.  If the whole people will set to work, the army can be shod and kept in shoes, and we feel assured that they will set to work in right good earnest.
               
So in the way of clothing and blankets.  Send everything you can possibly spare.  Get osnaburgs, where you have no blankets to spare, sew the pieces together, and stuff them with cotton.  Learn to sleep under as few blankets as possible, that you may send the overplus to the soldiers. . . .
 

The Southern Watchman [Athens, Ga.], October 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

                                                                Aid for the Soldiers.

                We copy the moving appeal of P. W. A. (the army correspondent of the Savannah *Republican*,) in behalf of our brave soldiers in the field.  We hope it will be read and heeded by everybody, though we must confess we do not see where the shoes and clothing are to come from.  All the leather, hides and shoes in the Confederacy are in the hands of heartless speculators.  The same is true of all the jeans, wool and cotton.  If there are any blankets we know nothing of them.   

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, October 18, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
To the Citizens of Jefferson Co.—I am authorized to receive and take to the regiment any and all such clothing as the friends of company C, (Captain Otey, formerly Captain McSwine's) may see proper to contribute.  They will send them to Pine Bluff and deposit them at the house of Levi & Meyer, with the name of the soldier for whom they are intended, marked on each garment.  Blankets, quilts or any substitutes are much needed.  It is desired that the clothing be ready by the 22d of October.
                                                                                                
                C. T. Harris, Lt. Co. B. 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, October 22, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

[Communicated.]

                Mr. Advertiser:  The condition of the soldiers in our armies calls "trumpet-tongued" upon the people of the Confederacy for relief, immediate and effectual—all accounts agree in this, that our troops in Virginia under Gen. Lee, whilst making forced marches into Maryland, fighting battle after battle, and with a courage unsurpassed in the annals of history, winning victory upon victory, were without provisions, were half naked and one-fourth without shoes. . . .
               
Planters, do your duty—come to the rescue of your suffering soldiers—give up a portion of your negro cloth; get your wives to dye it gray; have it made up, (the women will do it,) and send it to the army.  Give shoes only to your negro men who can do the outdoor work on your plantations, put your women and girls to spinning and weaving, (being in houses they will not need shoes); make blankets of your carpets.—Do all this, and when you lie down at night, you can say you have done your duty.  
                                                                                                
                                Lowndes. 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, October 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
The Savannah Republican says that the proprietors of the Pulaski House of that city have tendered all the carpets in their establishment to the Committee collecting clothing for the army.  There are 120 rooms in the house and the carpets will furnish 500 good blankets.  This is a splendid donation.  All honor to the generous proprietors. 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, October 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 7

Selfishness vs. Patriotism.

                The Selma Reporter publishes the following communication from a woman of Calhoun county.  We know that the State has no truer, and more devoted people than in that county, but here as well as there and elsewhere, there are those who are deaf to every consideration but that of money-making.  We hope all such will read this rebuke from a noble soul that truly appreciates the sufferings of a struggling country, and remember that if they do not heed the warning they will surely heap up wrath upon the wrath to come:
                                                                                                
                Oxford, October 13.
               
Mr. Editor:--The women of the South are called upon to aid in clothing our suffering soldiers, and we feel assured that every true Southern woman will lend a helping hand, until our brave soldiers re clothed and relieved from the sufferings to which they are now subjected.  With ready hearts and willing hands, we will work and do all that lies in the power of woman to accomplish. . . .
               
There are men in this county, Mr. Editor, who are having wool manufactured into yarns for their negroes.  Cannot the negroes wear cotton one winter?  Who is more interested in the result of this bloody struggle for independence than the slaveholder?  and yet how blind some of them seem to the fact.  We are willing, we repeat, to do everything we can in this matter—will give the last blanket from our beds, knit socks and do anything else that may be necessary.  We give these facts for what they are worth.
                                                                                                
                                Alabama.

 The Southern Banner [Athens, GA], October 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 7
    
           Handsome donation for the soldiers.--The Savannah Republican says that the Proprietors of the Pulaski House of that city have tendered all the carpets in their establishment to the Committee collecting for the Army.  There are 120 rooms in the House and the carpets will furnish 500 good blankets.  All honor to the generous Proprietors.                                                                                           R. L. Bloomfield.
 

Savannah [GA] Republican, October 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Clothing for the Soldiers—Despatch
from the Secretary of War.

                As our correspondent's testimony regarding the suffering in the army had been questioned, and a statement given to the public, on the assurance of army officers, that the government was abundantly supplied with shoes, clothing, and other necessaries and comforts for the army, which would be distributed at a proper time, and that private individuals were making unnecessary sacrifices under a mistaken view of the case, we determined, if possible, to satisfy both the public and ourselves on the subject.  We, accordingly, addressed a note of enquiry to the Secretary of War, who promptly replied by telegraph, as follows:
                                                                                                               
Richmond, Oct. 21.

J. R. Sneed:
               
We desire all the assistance in supplying shoes, blankets and clothing that can be furnished.
                                                                                                               
Geo.  W. Randolph,
                                                                                                               
Secretary of War.
               
This settles the question; and now, let all the people go to work.  Shoes, socks, drawers, vests, neck ties, indeed clothing of every description should be made up as fast as possible and forwarded to the army.
               
Parties in this State can safely entrust all packages to the Georgia Hospital and Relief Association, at Augusta.
 

Savannah [GA] Republican, October [mistranscribed, but between 22 and 27], 1862, p. 1, c. 2
                                                                                               
Richmond, Va., Oct. 18th, 1862.
. . . I am glad to learn that my appeal in behalf of the army has been received with so much favor throughout the Confederacy.  It has been a coal of fire even upon the back of the Government, which has already begun to send forward supplies of clothing and shoes.  Thirty wagons loaded with winter supplies reached Winchester the day before I left, and I met others en route for the same destination.  I called at the Clothing Bureau in this city this morning, for the purpose of improving my own wardrobe which is none the better for the Maryland campaign, but was told that there was not a yard of officer's cloth in the establishment, the supply having been exhausted some time since.  There was a considerable stock on hand of coarse strong cloth, which is being made up for the troops as rapidly as possible.  An officer connected with the Bureau informed me that 33,000 garments had been sent up to Gen. Lee's army within the last twenty days, and that clothing for the army was being made up at the rate of 9,000 garments per week.  The Government has fifty-eight tailors in its employ, whose business it is to cut out the garments, and two thousand seven hundred women who make them up.  The scraps of woolen cloth left by the cutters are sent to the Penitentiary, where they are converted into quilts, &c., for the use of the army, whilst those of cotton fabrics are dispersed to the paper manufacturers.
               
Allowing three garments to the man—coat, pants and shirt—the 33,000 pieces sent up to the army will furnish an outfit for 14,000 soldiers.  This will afford very great relief as far as it goes; yet it will fall far short of the necessaries of the army.  Estimating the clothing manufactured at all of the government establishments in the country at 20,000 garments per week, and the number of troops in the field at 350,000 men, it would require more than a year at this rate to furnish each man with one suit of clothes.  I do not include in this estimate blankets, shoes, socks and gloves, which are absolutely indispensable in a climate like this.
               
I have no means of knowing how many complete suits of clothing the government will be able to provide; but estimating them at 100,000 including a blanket, pair of shoes, two pairs of socks and one pair of gloves, there will still be left 250,000 men, who must perish unless they are supplied by the people at home.  If we suppose the government will be able to furnish winter outfits to 200,000 men, there will yet be 150,000 who must look to the open hearts and willing donors at home.  The government, however, will not be in a condition to supply so many of the troops either with blankets, shoes, socks or gloves.  Indeed, I am not aware that any provision has been made to secure a supply of either of these three indispensable articles.  Possibly some action was taken by Congress to have the shoemakers in the army detailed temporarily for the purpose of making shoes; but the shoes are needed now.  This step, to have been of any benefit, should have been taken months ago.  It is too late now to procure supplies of leather, thread and pegs; and even if we had an abundant stock of each, it would be months before a sufficient number of shoes could be manufactured to meet the present wants of the article.
               
These facts will enable the people of the country to appreciate the magnitude of the labors before them.  All my figures are merely rough estimates, especially in regard to the number of men in the field; but they are sufficiently accurate for the purpose for which they are offered.  Whilst the country will be amazed that no more effort has been made by those in authority to provide the army with suitable clothing, it will readily perceive the necessity of the most prompt and energetic measures on the part of the people if they would meet the shortcomings of the government.  If every man, woman and child in the South were to exert themselves to the utmost in this good work, still there would be many a brave fellow in the field who would suffer all the pains of a vigorous winter, if not of death, before the much needed relief could be received.
               
A statement appeared in one of the Richmond papers yesterday, based upon the report of a "passenger by the cars," to the effect that the condition of the troops was excellent, and that all they needed to render them entirely comfortable was a supply of blankets.  Such statements as this may be gratifying to the public, but they are a cruelty to the army.  I know, as every other observing man who has been with the army knows, that the condition of a vast number of our troops is deplorable.  A few regiments and companies may have an adequate supply of clothing and shoes, but a large majority are in no condition to encounter the rigors of the approaching winter.  Why, there are men in the hospitals at Winchester who are as naked as babes just born, and I saw here in the heart of Richmond this morning a poor emaciated soldier, who was hardly able to drag his bare feet along the cold pavement!  In the army I know there are thousands of as true men as ever fired a musket, who have neither shoes nor stockings, nor more than one suit of clothes, and that a summer suit, and dirty and ragged at that.
               
But I forbear.  Nay, I dare not tell the people all I know of the condition of the best and bravest army that ever trod the earth.  If they knew how many men in this army are without shirts—how many wear pants that do not cover their nakedness—and how many stand guard tonight upon bruised and bleeding feet—men, too, who have been accustomed to every comfort that a reasonable mind can desire—if they did not rise with indignation against those whose neglect has reduced the army to this deplorable condition, they would at least see that their most urgent and sacred duty is to come to its instant relief. . . . P.W.A. 

[Little Rock] Weekly Arkansas Gazette, October 25, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
Contributions for the Soldiers—The Patriotism [of] the Ladies of Little Rock.—
               
Mr. Editor:  But a short time ago, the ladies of Little Rock, of their own accord, held a meeting and determined upon measures to assist in furnishing our brave soldiers with blankets and other necessary articles of clothing.  Since then, carpets, costly and rich, have been converted into blankets, and other equally useful articles of clothing have been made [hole in paper].  Wiling, patriotic hearts have made [hole in paper] and fingers but little wont to use the coarse needle, now ply it with rapidity.  This argues well for the success of our cause.  A people thus working together, and willingly giving their property and their services to their country—their gentlewomen, like the matrons of Rome, giving, not mere trinkets of personal adornment, but house-hold property of real comfort and use in their families, all for the benefit and protection of the soldiers—can and must conquer. . . . The ladies who have thus parted with their carpets, are assured that their reward is a soldier's gratitude—a gratitude which none but a soldier can feel.
               
Will not the ladies of other towns and cities in this Military Department emulate the noble action of the ladies of Little Rock?
               
The thanks of the soldiers are also due to the Masonic Fraternity for the contribution of the carpet of their Lodge Room—making about 50 excellent blankets.
                                                                                                
                                Respectfully, &c.
                                                                                                
                                John B. Burton, Major
                                                                
                                and A. Q. M. Chief Clothing Bureau,
                                                                                                
                              Trans-Miss. Department.
Oct. 24, 1862. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, October 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
To the People of South Arkansas.—The soldiers of the 3d regiment Arkansas cavalry lost their clothes and blankets  in the late battles at Corinth; winter is approaching and they are nearly destitute.  Will the noble men and women who so generously supplied our wants last winter do so again?
               
Maj. M. J. Henderson, Benton, Saline county, will exert himself to obtain contributions, and take charge of all packages for the regiment.
               
Blankets, woolen shirts, drawers and socks, will be especially needed, but every article of clothing will be thankfully received.
                                                                                                
                Sam. G. Earle,
                                                                                                
                             Col. Com. 3rd Ark. Cav.
               
Holly Springs, Miss., Oct. 13, 1862. 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, October 29, 1862, p. 3, c. 4

Correspondence.

                                                                                                Near Robinson Springs, Autauga, Ala.        }
                                                                                                
                Oct. 20, 1862.                           }
               
Judge B. Bibb—Sir:--. . . I will send a package to the post office, directed to yourself, containing one woolen comfort and one bed quilt.  The quilt is sent by my daughter (Sallie J. Horne) who made and partly quilted it when she was ten years old.  I have no wool to knit socks, but we intend to have some heavy cotton socks ready in a short time.  Please let me know by letter or through the weekly Advertiser, whether you received the package or not.  My address is Wetumpka.  Yours most respectfully,
                                                                
                                Jane E. Robinson.

--------

                                                                                                                Montgomery, Ala., Oct. 22.
               
Mrs. Jane E. Robinson—Madam:--Your letter of 20th has been received, along with the bundle containing woolen comfort and quilt.  I willingly become the agent for a proper disposal of your gift, and beg to thank and commend you, Madam, and your estimable daughter, for your christian efforts in the holy duty of alleviating the sufferings of our soldiery.  The Ladies' Aid Association of this city are now preparing supplies to be sent to the relief of the suffering at Winchester, and your contributions shall accompany them at an early day.
                                                                
                Very respectfully,
                                                                
                                Your obedient serv't,
                                                                                                
                B. S. Bibb.

 Savannah [GA] Republican, October 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Clothing.—About 7,000 coats, 2,000 overcoats, 3,000 pairs of pants and 6,000 blankets have been handed over by the State Quartermaster General to Col. S. McGowan, acting for the Quartermaster General of the Confederate States.  This clothing is intended for the South Carolina soldiers in Virginia.
               
Our State authorities are taking active measures to replenish their stock and continue their supply.—[Char. Courier, 28th.

 Southern Confederacy [Atlanta, Ga.], November 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

The Women!  Their Unbounded Patriotism!

                The Chattanooga Rebel of the 30th says:
               
We are authorized to state that the ladies of Chattanooga will use their surplus dresses in making comforts for the soldier, if they can get cotton.  They are willing to pay for it if any person will furnish them what they want for this purpose.  Will not the men furnish the cotton without requiring the ladies to pay for it?
               
Now, wont somebody in Atlanta send a bale or two of cotton up to the ladies of Chattanooga, by Express, to-day? 

Natchez Daily Courier, November 4, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

For the Suffering Soldier.

                We wish to buy every Blanket, Comfort, Sock and Shoe for the army.  Fifty thousand men languish in the Hospitals and shiver over cheerless fires, that could now be put in the field to fight.  Much has already been done, and much more yet remains to be done.
    
           Let the Ladies take up their carpets, the Gentlemen empty their wardrobes, and all come to the help of the needy Soldiers, as Christians and Patriots, alone worthy of freedom's birth-right.
    
           All articles left with John C. Brown, at the store of James Carradine, will be gladly paid for, if required, and immediately forwarded, through Geo. J. Mortimer, from Brookhaven, to the most necessitous of the several departments.
    
           Let all respond with alacrity, and promptly.
                                                                                                               
Geo. J. Mortimer, and
                                                                                                               
Jno. C. Brown, Agents for
                                                                               
Major I. Mims, Ch'f Qr. Mas. this Dep't
Natchez, Nov. 4, 1862.

 Memphis Daily Appeal [Granada, MS], November 5, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
    
           The Chattanooga Rebel is authorized to state that the ladies of Chattanooga will use their surplus dresses in making comforts for the soldiers if they can get cotton.  They are willing to pay for it if any person will furnish them what they want for this purpose.  Will not the men furnish the cotton without requiring the ladies to pay for it?
    
           If such a spirit prevailed throughout the South, our soldiers would not long go unprovided for.

 Natchez Daily Courier, November 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
Two of the steamboats, unemployed on the river, have given their bedding, carpets, &c., to Major Mims, to be used, as blankets for the Southern soldiers.  An appeal is made to this city and county, for similar appropriations.  Better, far, that our extra blankets and all our carpets should be in the hands of our brave volunteers, than they should be destroyed by Federal soldiers.

Savannah [GA] Republican,
November 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
Destitution in our Western Army.—The correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser and Register writes thus from Holly Springs, under date of 20th ult.:
               
How poorly our Western army is prepared, none but those who have seen it can judge.  Everything that contributes to a soldier's comfort in the field is sadly needed, every species of quartermaster's supplies being out.  It is a safe statement to put forth that one third of the soldiers in this department are without a single blanket.  On the marches to and retreat s from Iuka and Corinth one half of the army lost their knapsacks, clothing and blankets, and there is no supply now on hand to relieve their destitution in this respect.  I know of a quartermaster of one division having a hundred or so of blankets for the division and no more are expected.  It is stated that there is not more than one thousand blankets within the department for Price's corps.  All those who are desirous of assisting in mitigating the sufferings and [illegible] of our soldiers, cannot do so in a more substantial or welcome manner than by sending blankets, coverlets, or bed clothing of any kind.
               
Any supplies thus donated may be addressed to Major Isaac Brinker, Chief Quartermaster Army of the West, Holly Springs, and they will quickly find their way to the suffering troops—more rapidly than by any other means.  Supplies thus forwarded should, when convenient, be sent by either the Pioneer or Southern Express companies.  Under-clothing, socks, etc., are needed equally as bad as blankets, and without the ladies of the South again exhibit the self-sacrificing patriotism which has been their glory, the poor fellows in the field who are battling and suffering for these very home endearments, must indeed pass a cold and comfortless winter.  The recent snow storm was severely felt, no winter quarters having previously been erected, and the command being entirely destitute of tents.  At a brigade or division encampment, scarcely enough tents are visible for the sheltering of a hundred men.  It is true, there are 13,000 tents—a full supply for the whole command—somewhere within the department.  But where?  Certainly not where our army is quartered.  They are principally off the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and will be sent forward to the troops so soon as the railroad is put at the disposal of the Quartermaster's department, but, in the meantime, the "eager, nipping air" is penetrating to the very bones of the shelterless thousands.


Southern Confederacy [Atlanta, Ga.],
November 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Appeal on Behalf of the Soldiers.

                Gov. Vance, of North Carolina, has issued the following address to the people of that State.  Its patriotism will apply in every quarter of the Confederacy.  He says:
               
After the most strenuous exertions on the part of its officers, the State finds it impossible to clothe and shoe our soldiers without again appealing to that overflowing fountain of generous charity--the private contributions of our people.  The rigors of winter are approaching, our soldiers are already suffering, and must suffer more if our sympathies are not practical and active.  The quartermasters Department is laboring faithfully to provide for them, but, owing to speculation and extortion, will fall short.  The deficiency must be supplied by the people.  We shall have an active winter campaign, and how can our troops, if ragged, cold, and barefoot, contend with the splendidly equipped columns of the enemy?
               
The articles most needed, and which the State finds it most difficult to supply, are shoes, socks and blankets, though drawers, shirts and pants would be gladly received.  If every farmer who has hides tanning would agree to spare one pair of shoes, and if every mother in North Carolina would knit one strong pair of either thick cotton or woolen socks for the army, they would be abundantly supplied.  A great lot of blankets, also, might yet be spared from private use, and thousands could be made from the carpets upon our parlor floors.  With good, warm houses and cotton bed clothing, we can certainly get through the winter much better than the soldiers can with all the blankets we can give them. . . .
                                                                                                                               
Z. B. Vance.
               
Raleigh, October 15, 1862.

 

[Marshall] Texas Republican, November 8, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
A lady of this place sends us the following welcome communication:

Who Will Help?

                Our soldiers are sadly in need of blankets, or something to shield them from the severity of the coming winter.  I can furnish material for several comforts, but need the cotton.  If some of the planters will furnish this, (and a few pounds from your ten, twenty, fifty, or hundred bales would not be missed) much might be done to relieve the sufferings of our brave soldiers during the approaching winter.  Everybody keeps a scrap bag, and from their contents, much could be put into use in this way.  Besides this, old calico or worsted dresses, cloth, linsey, old sheets, or domestic of any kind, can be manufactured into comforts, which when quilted will last at least during one winter.  In your lumber rooms and closets, being destroyed by moth, there is much which your dexterous fingers could fashion into a comfort.  No matter if faded and ugly, they will do.  If too light, from the wood materials for dying [sic] can be procured, and garments too much worn for other use will answer the purpose well.  The work to make them is trifling—four ladies can complete three in a day; and where so much might be done, it is not our privilege, as well as our duty to work with willing hearts and hands.
               
Who will furnish the cotton?  It can be left at almost any public house in town, convenient to all who are willing to aid.  I will undertake to make six at east to begin with, and hope that everybody will aid in the cause, and we may soon have a supply sufficient for the comfort of our soldiers, who will be subject to almost every exposure of winter.  Already the severity of the cold is telling upon the health of our thinly-clad troops in Virginia, Kentucky, and Arkansas, many of whom have not a blanket to cover them, when they seek the cold hard earth for rest, after days of marching and toil.  Who will, or rather who will not help?  Let everybody go to work with a will, and while we repose upon downy beds at home, the brave volunteer will bless us as he wraps his weary limbs our hands have furnished, and feel that though exiled he is still remembered, still cherished.  All are our brothers and friends.  Who would not labor to alleviate the sufferings or promote the happiness and welfare of a brother?
                                                                                                
                                H. A. P.
Locust Glen, Nov. 3, 1862.

[Marshall] Texas Republican, November 8, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Circular.

To the People of the Trans-Mississippi Department, composed of the States of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas:
               
At no period since the commencement of the contest in which we are now engaged has there existed a more pressing necessity for active and zealous co-operation on the part of the people of these States with the military authorities, than at the present moment.  The partial occupation of the Mississippi River Line by our enemies has so far impeded communication with the other States of the Confederacy, as to compel those charged with the duty of providing for the wants of our army, to seek for and develop new sources of supply.  Our army is in urgent need of blankets and clothing of every description, to enable them to withstand the rigor of the approaching winter, as well as to successfully oppose the invaders of our soil, and they can be furnished with but little from the other side of the Mississippi, or by the few manufactories now established in these States.
               
In this emergency, Maj. Gen. T. H. Holmes, commanding in this department, relying confidently on the patriotism of the people, directs me to make an appeal to them for that assistance which all can afford to give without much individual inconvenience, and which if promptly furnished, will greatly promote the success of our army.  Every family throughout this Department, possessed of a spinning wheel and loom, is requested to manufacture as large a quantity of cloth, (both woolen and cotton) as the raw material will permit.  Those who have no facilities for spinning or weaving may assist in the good work by making up shirts, drawers, pantaloons, coats, and overcoats, and by knitting stockings, making hats or caps, and shoes, while those have looms adapted to the purpose, can furnish blankets or some other article answering the same object. . . .
                                                                                                
                                John D. Adams,
                                                                
                                Capt. & Acting Chief Quartermaster,
                                                                                                
                Trans-Mississippi District.
               
Little Rock, Ark., Aug. 22, 1862.

Weekly Columbus [GA] Enquirer, November 11, 1862, p. 3, c. 2
               
Carpet Blankets.—Major M. W. Perry yesterday exhibited to us a Carpet Blanket made for the army.  It is undoubtedly a most excellent and warm covering, and will be a very comfortable addition to a soldier's bed clothing.  It is made of scraps of cloth cut into strips and woven closely together, forming a heavy and warm counterpane, one of them being worth two or three common bed blankets for warmth and durability.
               
We understand that a reliable gentleman has contracted with Quartermaster Dillard to make these blankets out of the scraps left in making soldiers' clothing, and that he has several looms at work weaving and a number of children cutting and sewing together the strips.  He will be enabled to turn out the blankets pretty fast for a new business, and the work will give employment to a number of women and children needing something to do.
               
These blankets would also be the most comfortable night covering for negroes, and they will no doubt be extensively used hereafter by those planters who examine them.

 Memphis Daily Appeal [Granada, MS], November 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
Call at Geo. Lake's store and secure a chance for the magnificent silk quilt to be disposed of for the benefit of the soldiery.  It is donated by a lady, and is her own handiwork.  The fortunate one will find himself the possessor of a valuable and beautiful article.  Only a few chances remain to be disposed of. 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, November 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

Clothing for the Soldiers.

                Much misapprehension exists throughout the country in regard to the condition of the army under Gen. Bragg, which has recently returned to Tennessee, from Kentucky. . . Officers have been detached and sent to all portions of the country, to urge upon the people the importance of making strenuous exertions to provide for the wants of the suffering soldiers.  They state that the soldiers are without shoes, without clothes, without blankets, and without tents.  Their statements are corroborated by letter writers from the army, and there can be no doubt that thousands of our soldiers are today shivering among the mountains of Tennessee without the necessary covering to protect them from the snow and sleet. . . .  The soldiers need blankets, and while we are aware that the people of this country contributed liberally last winter of their stock, we know that there are still many thousands of pairs which can and will be dispensed with when their owners are satisfied how greatly they are desired by the soldiers.  A lady correspondent suggests that the blankets be given and their places supplied with comforts.  She appears to think, and we agree with her, that these articles, which can be manufactured in almost every family, will be much more comfortable than the blankets, if the owners have the satisfaction of knowing that the latter are being used by the soldiers to protect them from the rude blasts of winter.  The same correspondent suggests that the blankets now used in the hospitals can be taken and their places advantageously supplied with comforts.  The suggestion is worthy of consideration, and we commend it to those who have charge of such matters. . . . 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, November 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Governor's Message.

                                                                                                                Executive Department,                }
                                                                
                                Montgomery, Ala., Nov. 10th, 1862           }.

Clothing Bureau.

                Reports from the Quartermaster Department show the aid given by the State for the supply of clothing to Alabama soldiers in the Confederate service.  From these it appears that the State has issued 6,102 overcoats, 16,024 jackets, 17,337 pants, 19,230 shirts, 16,535 drawers, 7,002 hats, 6,257 blankets, 11,979 pair socks, 10,798 pair shoes, besides many other articles. . . 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, November 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
Wanted—300 Bed Comforts for the use of the Army, for which a good price will be paid.  The seller to furnish everything.  For further particulars apply to
                                                                                                
                E. Silverberg, Medical
                                                                                                
                          Purveyor, Little Rock, Ark. 

Clarke County [AL] Journal, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 1       
Capt. Cleveland's Company.—Mr. Henry Lovett, of Capt. Cleveland's Cavalry Company, is now in this County for the purpose of procuring clothing, shoes, blankets &c., for the men.  Persons should have their articles at the Office of the Probate Judge by the middle of next week, as Mr. Lovett will return about that time.  Do your best for the needy soldiers.
The Company is at Greenville, on the Mississippi river, a considerable distance above Vicksburg.  

Clarke County [AL] Journal, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 2       
Dickinson Guards.—The friends of this company are notified that Lieut. S. P. Chapman has returned to the County for the purpose of obtaining clothing, shoes &c. for the company.  They are sadly in want of such articles, and we trust that a sufficiency may be obtained to render the company comfortable for the winter.  All articles must be left at the Office of the Probate Judge by the 20th inst. in order that they may be packed in the same box.  The Company is also in much need of blankets, quilts, &c.  

Clarke County [AL] Journal, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 4       
We are in receipt of a letter from s. T. Woodard, Captain of the Grove Hill Guards, in which he states that the Company is greatly in need of Clothing, Shoes, Blankets, &c.  Friends and the public are appealed to to furnish such articles or many are bound to suffer during the approaching winter.  Articles, boxed up and directed to the Company, will be forwarded from Montgomery, by Gov. Shorter, free of charge.—We trust something may be done for them as soon as possible. 

Natchez Daily Courier, November 18, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

The Suffering Soldier.

                We are glad to notice that the contributions for our suffering soldiers are coming in quite briskly to Mr. Carradine's store.  So far, however, they have nearly all been received from the city.  One person has donated twenty-eight blankets, while others have done nobly.  Will not our country people, and our neighbors in Concordia parish, read the appeal published elsewhere, and liberally respond to the call?  "Time is precious!"  The enemy is battering at our outposts, and our whole force should be in the field.  At Vicksburg the Churches have appropriated all their carpets; of what use would carpets prove in Natchez, if Porter's fire-fleet should reach our city's front and our beautiful home be put to the flames?
    
           Action! action!! should rule us all, from this moment until the enemy is badly whipped.  Leap over all barriers, and at once prove to your suffering countrymen in the field that you are equal to the task of their delivery.    

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, November 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 5
               
Substitute for Blankets.—We have been shown a substitute for soldier's blankets, manufactured under the direction of Mrs. Wiley E. Jones, of this vicinity.  It is made after the style of rag carpets of a new material, and colored with barks so as to make it the "loyal nut brown hue," so well adapted to camp life.  The sample we have seen is a good substitute, and can be manufactured at a cost not exceeding $4.50 or $5.
               
Let others of our female friends follow the patriotic example of Mrs. Jones.  Blankets can't be had—they are not in the country, and money won't buy them.  Our soldiers must have something to shield them from the frosts and snow of the coming winter, and rag carpet blankets will do when nothing better can be hand.—Columbus Sun. 

Galveston Weekly News, November 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Clothing for Our Home Troops.

                                                                                                                Office of Sen. Ass't Q'R Master,
                                                                                                
                Houston Mil. Sub-District,
                                                                                                
                Houston, Nov. 13th, 1862.

. . . I appeal to the people of this District--and I appeal specially to its women--to assist us in this emergency.  Send upper and under clothing, shoes, socks, comforts, blankets, overcoats or material of some kind, to make them.  Articles designed for any particular regiment, battalion, or company, if carefully put up and properly addressed, will be sent to their destination.  What cannot be given will be paid for cheerfully.  . . .
                                                                                                
                E. C. Wharton,
                                                                                                
                Captain and A.Q.M.C.S.A.

  Galveston Weekly News, November 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Clothing for Our Home Troops.

                                                                                Office of Sen. Ass't Q'R Master,
                                                                               
Houston Mil. Sub-District,
                                                                               
Houston, Nov. 13th, 1862.
While our generous men and noble hearted women are exerting themselves again to supply from their scanty store, clothing to the heroes who so admirably sustain, out of the State, the honor and renown of Texas, let them not forget that there are those, nearer their homes, who equally need their welcome and timely contributions.  True, these soldiers have not been baptised, as their gallant brethren abroad, in the terrible baptism of fire and blood, but they are embattled specially to defend the firesides of Texas, mothers, wives and daughters; and that sacred duty entitles them to at least some portion of the aid and sympathy that the women of our land have so freely extended to our brave men elsewhere.
. . .
    
           Our supplies of clothing and clothing material are limited.  Our resources for others, in time, are scant.  Even with the means and the time, there are many necessary articles that we must look to the people to make and gather up, from the raw material in their hands.  We need these now.  Winter is fast approaching.  Already our home defenders have suffered from its premonitory severities, and are ill prepared to meet the piercing norther and the cold, drenching rain.  They have not murmured, nor do they falter in their duty--the more powerful reason that those they defend should promptly aid in shielding them from the keen and merciless blast.
    
           I appeal to the people of this District--and I appeal specially to its women--to assist us in this emergency.  Send upper and under clothing, shoes, socks, comforts, blankets, overcoats or material of some kind, to make them.  Articles designed for any particular regiment, battalion, or company, if carefully put up and properly addressed, will be sent to their destination.  What cannot be given will be paid for cheerfully.  And let me entreat them not to delay in this good work, else we shall be left, as we now are, to the tender mercies of the hordes of extortioners, who swarm in our land; who besiege us from sun-rise to sun-set, and whose dreams are but of their unholy gains.  Nothing restrains these cormorants and vultures in human form; nor patriotism, nor conscience, nor the 8th commandment--nay, not even that nightmare of Quarter Masters and horror of editors, the Army Regulations! which, in prohibiting, in the strictest terms, speculation, direct or indirect, in the public funds and property, by officers in charge thereof, did not contemplate, apparently, the possibility of citizens of this Confederacy shamelessly plundering the Treasury, unrelentingly robbing the soldier, and treacherously sucking the lifeblood of a nation struggling for its existence and liberties.  Leave not your soldiers in the grasp of these worse than traitors!
                                                                                                               
E. C. Wharton,
                                                                                                             
Captain and A.Q.M.C.S.A.

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, November 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

A Worthy Example.

                We learn that the members of St. Paul's Church, in this city, have determined to take up the carpet on the floor of that sanctuary and convert it into blankets for our soldiers.  We heartily commend their action to other churches in this city and throughout the Confederacy.  Surely we can afford to kneel or stand upon bare floors to shelter from the cold the bodies of the brave men who are fighting to secure our rights of conscience no less than our political liberties.—Columbus Times. 

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, November 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 7
               
1000 Yards of Calico!!! at the Purveyor's office, to make Comforts for Hospitals.  A liberal price will be paid for making the same.  Thread, needles, etc., furnished.
                                                                                                
                                E. Silverberg, Surg.,
                                                                                                
                                and Medical Purveyor. 

Savannah [GA] Republican, November 27, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Domestic Manufactures.—We were shown some days ago, a blanket made of what is generally considered worthless materials, that for comfort is equal to the best.  It is composed of numberless scraps of thick grey uniform cloth sewed together, and the edges handsomely bound, and is the handiwork of Miss Amanda Rhan, of Effingham county.  Thousands of such scraps are daily thrown away, whilst this patriotic lady has proved that with a little trouble they may be made to secure the comfort and preserve the life of many a brave soldier.  Let others imitate her example.


Natchez Daily Courier
, November 29, 1862, p. 1, c. 1--list of carpets, comforts, socks, blankets, necktie, woolen shirts, gloves, quilt, donated, by donor and what given.

 Charleston Mercury, December 2, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Important to Soldiers' Aid Societies.--The following notice, from the Quartermaster General's Department, is published in the Richmond papers:
               
It is announced for the information of all concerned, that the Quartermaster's Department will pay for shoes, blankets and other articles of clothing, which may be contributed by the people of the counties in the several States of the Confederacy, to their soldiers in the field, at the prices stated in the following table; provided, that such articles are supplied under the direction of the County Courts or other county tribunals:
Caps..........$2.00                                                    Drawers..........$1.00
Jackets.......12.00                                                   Shoes................6.00
Pants............9.00                                                   Woolen Socks...1.00
Flannel Shirts...3.00                                              Overcoats (with capes).....25.00
Cotton Shirts....1.00                                             Blankets (per pair).....15.00
"Striped Cotton Shirts....1.50
               
Payment will be made upon delivery at the nearest Quartermaster's Post on the line of railroad transportation, and the articles will be sent or issued to the Chief Quartermaster of the nearest military department, by whom they will be issued, so far as may be needed, to the particular troops for whom they were intended.  In all cases, however, where such troops shall be already supplied, the articles will be issued to others who may require them.

Galveston Weekly News, December 3, 1862.

Aid for the Soldiers!

                The ladies of Richmond, Texas, have formed a society for the benefit of our suffering soldiers, as well for those who are guarding our homes here, as for those who are in the army in Virginia and Tennessee.  The Fort Bend Ladies' Aid Society meets every Saturday at Herndon Hall, Richmond.
               
Ladies in other counties are invited to become members, and are requested to forward amount of initiation fee (one dollar) to either the President or Secretary--don't know who they are, but presume they are two of the prettiest women in Fort Bend--and to contribute such articles of clothing and blankets as they can spare.

Savannah [GA] Republican, December 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 2

Condition of the Troops in Virginia.

                                                                                                                Savannah, Dec. 4th, 1862.
Editor Savannah Republican:
               
Dear Sir:--We are frequently surprised by receiving letters from home, congratulating us upon being so well prepared for a winter campaign in Virginia.  This is probably true with regard to most of the Georgia troops in Virginia, but in reference to Lawton's Brigade, it is very far from the truth.  This error has probably been promulgated through the papers by letters from members of other Brigades. . .
               
Lawton's Brigade is composed of the 13th, 26th, 31st, 38th, 60th, and 61st Georgia Regiments, and I venture to assert that a more gallant set of men were never embodied under one command. . . At the last report from our Brigade we had seven hundred and five (705) men without shoes, and there are numbers without a single blanket to shelter them from the cold.  This is no fiction, but a simple statement of the truth.  Georgians!  think of this, think of such a number of these men, who have aided in making the name of Georgia illustrious, marching twenty and twenty-five miles per day, with nothing to shelter their feet from contact with the snow, frost and rocks, and without a blanket to shelter them from the chilling blast at night, and this, too, without a murmur at their hard fate. . .
                                                                               
Very respectfully,
                                                                               
                Your obedient servant,
                                                                                                               
James S. Blain,
                                                                                               
Capt. Co. A, 26th Georgia Reg't.

 Weekly Columbus [GA] Enquirer, December 9, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Soldiers' Clothing.

                The Richmond papers publish an important announcement from the Quartermaster General's Office, dated Richmond, Nov. 28th.  It gives notice that that Department will pay for shoes, blankets, and other articles of clothing which may be contributed by the people of the counties in the several States to their soldiers in the field, provided that such articles are supplied under the direction of the county authorities—and offers the following prices therefor:  Caps $2, Jackets $12, Pants $9, Flannel Shirts $8, Cotton Shirts $1, Striped Cotton Shirts $1.50, Drawers $1, Shoes $6, Woolen Socks $1, Overcoats with capes $25, Blankets per pair $15.
               
The articles so furnished will be issued, as far as needed, to the particular troops for whom they are intended—but if they are already supplied, to others.  Payments will be made on delivery at the nearest Quartermaster's post.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, December 10, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
The ladies of Chattanooga offer to use their surplus dresses in making comforts for the soldiers, if they can get cotton.  They are willing top pay for it, if any person will furnish them what they want for this purpose.

Memphis Daily Appeal [Jackson, MS], December 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 8
Important to Soldiers' Aid Societies.  The following notice, from the quartermaster-general's department, is published in the Richmond papers:
    
           It is announced, for the information of all concerned, that the quartermaster's department will pay for shoes, blanket and other articles of clothing, which may be contributed by the people of the counties in the several States of the Confederacy, to their soldiers in the field, at the prices stated in the following table, provided, that such articles are supplied under the direction of the county courts or other county tribunals:
Caps.............................$2 00     Drawers.........................$  1
Jackets..........................12 00     Shoes.............................    6
Pants............................. 9 00      Woolen socks................     1
Flannel shirts................   3 00      Overcoats (with capes...   25
Cotton shirts................. 1 00      Blankets (per pair)..........   15
Striped cotton shirts.......1 50
    
           Payment will be made upon delivery at the nearest quartermaster's post on the line of railroad transportation, and the articles will be sent or issued to the chief quartermaster of the nearest military department, by whom they will be issued, so far as may be needed, to the particular troops for whom they were intended.  In all cases, however, where such troops shall be already supplied, the articles will be issued to others who may require them.

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, December 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

Another Appeal to the Women of Alabama.

                                                                                                        Executive Department of Alabama,     }
                                
                                                                                Montgomery, Dec. 6, 1862.       }
               
The troops of this State, who are bravely defending your liberties, in the mountains of Virginia and Tennessee, are suffering for blankets.  The Confederate Government is unable to supply them in sufficient quantity.  I must again appeal to the women of Alabama, who have so well sustained their part in the revolution, to give up their carpets, their remaining blankets and such other suitable bed clothing as they can spare to the cause of independence.  A ready response to this appeal is certain to increase the efficiency of our troops and alleviate their sufferings.  It may save the lives of thousands.
               
The articles contributed should be sent to Duff. C. Green, Q. M. General, Mobile, George G. Lyon, Esq., Demopolis, F. L. Johnston & Co., Selma, W. R. Picket, A. Q. M., Montgomery, and Robert W. Coleheart at Huntsville, or to the Judges of Probate of counties, who will forward them as above, at the expense of the State.
                                                                                                
                Jno. Gill Shorter,
                                                                                                
                                Governor of Alabama.
               
N.B.—All papers in the State will give this appeal one insertion and forward accounts to the Executive office.
                                                                                                
                John B. Taylor,
                                                                                                
                                Private Secretary. 

Galveston Weekly News, December 17, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
               
We have received a package containing sundry useful articles for our troops, labeled:  "The Widow's Mite for the Relief of our Soldiers!"
               
Since the above was written, we have received from Miss J. D. the articles named in the following note, and will dispose of them as directed:
Houston, Dec. 10th, 1862.
               
Ed. News:--In response to Col. Cook's call, some time since, for lint and bandages, I herewith send one pound of the former, one hundred and eighty-two yards of the latter, from one to three inches in width, and old linen for compresses, &c.  Also six carpet blankets, ten Merino scarfs [sic], four pairs woolen socks, three worsted shirts, two undershirts, four pairs drawers.
               
Please send the blankets and clothing to soldiers that you may know are most in need of them, and oblige, very respectfully                                                  Miss J. D. 

We have the pleasure to make the following report since our appeal in behalf of our suffering soldiers, many of whom are without covering:
               
From Mr. C. W. L. 1 carpet; Mrs. F. W. Gray, 1 carpet; Mrs. Dr. Cone, 3 carpet blankets; Mrs. J. F. Cruger, 3 blankets; Mrs. W. J. Hutchins, 2 carpets and 3 blankets; Mrs. M. A. Dumble, 1 carpet; Capt. Chas. Gearing, a lot of blankets from off the steamboats.
               
The disposition made of the above is as follows:
               
Comp. B, Galv. Artillery, Capt. Weir, 27 blankets; Capt. Lecbults (sp?) 4 blankets; Sibley's Brigade, Col. Reiley commanding, 21 blankets.
               
We will have all carpets, sent in for the soldiers made up free of expense to the donors.
                                                                                                
                C. S. Longcope.

  Savannah [GA] Republican, December 23, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
Liberal and Patriotic Donations.—We had an interview yesterday with a gallant member of Gen. John H. Morgan's Brigade, Mr. B. F. Hibler, who was en route to the army in Tennessee with three hundred and twenty-six pairs woolen socks, and a lot of blankets, a donation from his sister-in-law, Mrs. Peter Wier, of Sumter county, Alabama, to our soldiers there in need of such articles.  This is one of the most generous and patriotic donations, of which we have heard; well timed too, and of articles more needed now than any others by our suffering soldiery in the snow covered mountains in Tennessee.  We learn, also, that this is only a tithe of what this patriotic and benevolent lady has done.  Heretofore she has contributed largely, nay lavishly, from her ample means, to our suffering soldiers, having furnished them with a large quantity of jeans, drawers, and so forth.  Alabama may well be proud of this noble woman!—[Atlanta Intelligencer.

 Natchez Daily Courier, December 27, 1862, p., 1, c. 4
Brave and Bonny Ladies.  The Murfreesboro' correspondent of the Columbus (Ga.) Sun relates the following instance of female heroism:
    
           Misses Mary Burton and Emma Reese live near Goodlettsville, on the farther side of the Cumberland river, in ten miles of Nashville.  Their homes are in the possession of the Yankees.  These young ladies have brothers in Bragg's army, desiring to bring them blankets and clothes made by their own fair hands, they concluded to put off on horseback for Murfreesboro'.  Placing the blankets under their saddles, and wearing the clothing under their own, they left home, veritable female Gil Bla's, seeking adventures.  After passing through the Federal lines they swam the Cumberland, and then took tortuous paths through unknown woods and came to Murfreesboro', distance over sixty miles, in two days.  On the way they stopped to have their horses shod, when a squad of about fifty Yankees came suddenly upon them.  One of the most inquisitive asked why they had so many blankets on their horses, whereupon they replied because their backs were sore.
    
           I have a list of the articles each brought, and had I not promised not to divulge secrets, would give them.  Suffice it to say, they are almost incredibly numerous.
    
           Miss Burton is a perfect pink, and with personal beauty, combines the attractions of a cultivated mind, polished manners and a benevolent disposition.  The tinge of Hebe is on her cheeks and the grace and elasticity of Diana in her steps. 

Galveston Weekly News December 31, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
                                                                                               
Houston, Dec. 22, 1862.
W. Richardson, Esq.
               
Dear Sir:--You will receive per bearer the following articles for the use of the Company commanded by Captain Van Mcmahan:  18 carpet blankets, 1 comfort, 3 coats, old.  These have (like unto the others) been sent to me for the purpose of distribution.  The women (God bless them) are daily responding, and the call of "Who next?" is being cheerfully and liberally responded to.
               
Yours respectfully,                                              C. S. Longcope.
               
By-the-by, Mr. R., permit me to say that the Brussels carpet can be softened and made to answer almost as well as the tapestry carpeting for blankets.   

Galveston Weekly News, December 31, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
                                                                
                                Houston, Dec. 22, 1862.
W. Richardson, Esq.
               
Dear Sir:--You will receive per bearer the following articles for the use of the Company commanded by Captain Van McMahan:  18 carpet blankets, 1 comfort, 3 coats, old.  These have (like unto the others) been sent to me for the purpose of distribution.  The women (God bless them) are daily responding, and the call of "Who next?" is being cheerfully and liberally responded to.
               
Yours respectfully,                                          C. S. Longcope.
               
By-the-by, Mr. R., permit me to say that the Brussels carpet can be softened and made to answer almost as well as the tapestry carpeting for blankets.

1863 

Natchez Daily Courier, January 6, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

Blankets and Supplies for the Soldier.

     We are prone to forget that there are many a poor soldier, who are yet without blankets these cold, stormy nights.  Warm ourselves, we are too apt to forget those who are in the field, suffering from exposure.  We are informed that there is still a great lack of blankets and socks.  If we look around our premises, cannot we find one or more carpet that can be spared; a few more pairs of socks?  If so, let them be forwarded immediately to Mr. James Carradine's store.  The soldiers are yet in want; let us respond to their wants, liberally and promptly.   

Clarke County [AL] Journal, January 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 5

Another Appeal to the Women of Alabama.

                                                                            Executive Department of Alabama                }                   
                                                                            Montgomery, 7th Dec. 1862.       }             
            The troops of this State who are bravely defending your liberties, in the mountains of Virginia and Tennessee, are suffering for blankets.  The Confederate Government is unable to supply them in sufficient quantity.  I must again appeal to the women of Alabama, who have so well sustained their part in this revolution, to give up their carpets, their remaining blankets, and such other suitable bedclothing as they can spare to the cause of independence.  A ready response to this appeal is certain to increase the efficiency of our troops and alleviate their sufferings.  It may save the lives of thousands.           
            The articles contributed should be sent to Duff C. Green, Q. M. General, Mobile; Geo. C. Lyon, Esq., Demopolis; E. L. Johnson & Co., Selma; W. B. Pickett, A. Q. M., Montgomery, and Robert W. Colchart, Huntsville, or to the Judges of Probate of Counties, who will forward them as above at the expense of the State.                     
                                                                                                                John Gill Shorter,                 
                                                                                                                Governor of Alabama.       
N.B.—All papers in the State will give this appeal one insertion and forward their account to the Executive Office.                 
                                                                                                                 John B. Taylor,                  
                                                                                                                Private Secretary.  

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, January 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 4

Special Notice.

                                                                                                                Richmond, Dec. 10, 1862.
               
It is announced for the information of all concerned that the Quartermaster's Department will pay for Shoes, Blankets and other articles of clothing contributed for the Marylanders in the field, and supplied under the direction of the Maryland Society, at the prices stated in the following table: . . .
               
Blankets, per pair                                 15.00
               
Contributions to be forwarded to "The Maryland Society" at Richmond.  Communications may be addressed to Capt. J. L. B. Dorsey, President of Maryland Society, Assistant Quartermaster General's office, Richmond, Va.

Weekly Columbus [GA] Enquirer, February 3, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

Letter from J.T.S.

                                                                                            Headquarters, 20th Reg. Ga. Vols.,     }
                                                                            
near Fredericksburg, Va., Jan. 20, '63.               }
               
Dear Enquirer:  Since the date of my last, everything has been quiet along the Rappahannock. . . .
                                                                                   
J.T.S.
               
P.S.—Captain Mims, Co. I, requests me to tender to Misses Lucy and Emma Peabody, of your city, thanks for the donation of two splendid carpet blankets for his company.  The gifts were appropriately distributed to two of our most needy and brave boys, who will ever bear the names of the beautiful and charitable donors in lasting remembrance.  We trust their lucent example will be so far imitated until every soldier in our army will be provided with warm covering to shield him from the excessive cold of this latitude.  Fair damsels, whom shall we thank next?                                                                            J.T.S.
 

 Savannah [GA] Republican, April 6, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
There is a blanket and hat manufactory now in operation at Jackson, Miss.  The blankets are very superior, being made of wool felted on thin cotton goods.  They seem to be much warmer than woven blankets, though scarcely as durable.  The hats are quite stylish, and will wear till a man tires of them.

[Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, April 15, 1863, p. 1, c. 2
               
The Mississippian, in an article on the resources of Mississippi, states that the factory at Jackson makes cloth for five thousand garments weekly.—Factories at Bankstown, Choctaw county, Columbus, Enterprise, Natchez and Woodville, make up five thousand a week.  Hat factories at Jackson and Columbus turn out two hundred hats a day.  At the former place a factory makes fifty blankets a day.  The Pemberton works, at Enterprise, and the Dixie works, at Canton, make not less than sixty wagons and ambulances a week.  A tannery at Magnolia supplies six hundred hides daily, and they will soon have a shoe shop in Jackson with a capacity of turning out six thousand pairs of shoes a month. 

Savannah [GA] Republican, May 22, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
Cargo Sale.—Messrs. LaRoche & Bell, Wednesday last, sold the cargo of the steamer President and others from Nassau.  The following prices were realized:  Turk's Island Salt, 53 to 85 cents per pound; Coffee, $3 to $3.60 per pound; Copperas, 75 cents to $1 per pound; Morphine, $23 per oz., Quinine, $23.50 to $25 per oz; Saltpetre, $2.15 per lb; Carb. Soda, $2.55 per pound; Cream Tartar, $1 per pound; Epson Salts, $1.25 per pound; Nails, $90 per keg; Matches, $12 per gross; Blankets, $19 per pair; Cotton Cards, $26 to $30 per pair; Prints, wide and narrow, $1.75 to $2.50 per yard; Ladies' Gaiters, $19.50 per pair; Misses; Gaiters, $14 per pair; Men's English Sewed Shoes, $14.50 per pair; Letter Paper, $45 to $50 per ream; Green Tea, $7 per pound; Ladies' Hose, $25 to $45 per dozen.
 

The Southern Banner [Athens, Ga.], June 17, 1863, p. 3, c. 2

Meeting of the Ladies of Athens.

                                                                                                                Athens, June 12th 1863.
    
           In response to a call by the President of the Ladies' Volunteer Association, Mrs. Rutherford, the ladies of Athens assembled at the Town Hall, on Thursday, June 11th, to elect the officers of the Association for the ensuing year.  The same corps of officers were retained, with one exception.
    
           The Secretary read the annual report.  The amount of work accomplished during the year being as follows:  339 shirts, 349 pr drawers, 155 pr socks, 159 pr pants, 49 coats, 36 comforts, 9 mattrasses [sic], 15 overshirts, 27 sundries.  Total, 1,138 articles.--After supplying the four companies during the year, the following amount of clothing still remains in possession of the Society:  103 shirts, 81 pair drawers, 41 pr socks.  Hospital supplies have been forwarded as follows:  To Atlanta, 6 boxes hospital stores.--To Richmond, Va., 7 boxes, 1 barrel, $138.  To Dalton, Ga. 1 box, 25 shirts, 17 pr drawers, 30 pr socks, 5 comforts, ? mattr'ses.  To Union Point, one supply for hospital.

                                                                Treasurer's Report.

Cash received,                                                                      $596 40
Cash paid out,                                                                        296 40
Balance on hand June 11th,                                                   $300 00
    
           Amount collected for relief of Fredericksburg sufferers, $752.
    
           The President introduced the following resolutions, which were unanimously adopted by the meeting.  They are considered equally obligatory on absent members:
    
           Resolved, That each member of the Society will furnish six pair socks during the next six months.
    
           Resolved, That each member of the Society will furnish six bottles wine during the ensuing four months.
     
           Resolved, That no member of the Society shall refuse work sent by her Directress, unless a case of violent illness shall justify a conscientious rejection.
    
           Without further business, the meeting adjourned.                        P. Thomas.
                                                                                                                
Secretary & Treasurer.
L.  Rutherford, President.
 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, July 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Circular Address
To the People of Alabama.

                                                                                                                Montgomery, July 13th, 1863.. . .

Soldiers' Clothing.

                The State has not been unmindful of the claims upon her attention, of her brave soldiers, who, far away from their homes, are risking their lives in her defense.  Every provision in her power has been made for their comfort.  The returns of the Quartermaster department show that the following quantity and kind of clothing have been furnished them since my inauguration:--11,723 hats; 3,878 overcoats; 14,870 jackets; 16,220 pants; 31,780 shirts; 16,876 drawers; 10,569 pairs of socks; 16,960 pairs of shoes, and 2,384 blankets.  . . . 

Savannah [GA] Republican, September 7, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

Letter from the Twenty-Fifth Geo.

                                                                                                                In Camp, Sept. 1st 1863.
. . . are now encamped at the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, eleven miles from Chattanooga and six from the river. . . The change in temperature is very marked, the nights being quite cool, especially as to us who have but scanty wardrobes and hardly a blanket to ten men.  Many are barefoot, and at night, having no blanket, have to lie upon the naked ground, so that we naturally dread the approach of frost, which will fall early, if we are to judge from present appearances.  If the government is unable to supply our deficiencies in clothing, it is to hoped that the fight, now expected, will come off soon, so that we could, if successful, furnish ourselves from the army of the enemy. . . Polk.

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, September 30, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

An Appeal for the Ladies' Hospital.

                Mr. Reid:  We have had such frequent occasion recently to acknowledge liberal donations to the Soldier's Home through your paper that I almost hesitate to make another appeal to our friends in its behalf.  The Home is now crowded with wounded soldiers from the recent battle, and our bedding is not sufficient to meet the unusual demand.  For every blanket, comfort, sheet or pillow, which any family can furnish, we shall feel most grateful.  We know that there has been a constant drain upon the supply of private families since the war began, and we hope no one will hesitate to send one article, when more can not be spared, because it seems a small donation; thereby much may be contributed to the comfort of one wounded soldier.  We are greatly in need, too, of old linen and old cotton, and butter, chickens, eggs, and eatables of every kind will be very acceptable.
               
And now, while we thank our friends for their past liberality, we feel that it justifies us in the belief, that every family will be glad of the opportunity of testifying its gratitude to the brave soldiers who have so recently fought and bled in our country's cause, and whose valor has aided in driving from the borders of our sister State the invading hosts of the enemy.  We feel assured this call will meet with a ready and prompt response.
               
Respectfully,                                                        S. L. A. Bibb,
                                                                
                                Pres. S. A. Association.
Montgomery, Sept. 24, 1863.

Washington [Ark.] Telegraph, October 14, 1863
J. D. Thomas, M.Q.M. of this place, wishes to purchase carpets for soldiers' blankets.

 Savannah [GA] Republican, October 21, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
                                                                                               
In Front of Chattanooga,
                                                                                                               
October 16th, 1863
. . . Enquiry at the Quartermaster's Department, in Richmond, and personal observation in the armies of Gen. Lee and Gen. Bragg, leave no doubt that the greatest want of the troops this winter will be for blankets.  It is not probable that there will be an adequate supply of either clothing, shoes, or hats, or even of provisions, unless we recover East Tennessee; but the chief want, as already stated, will be blankets.  Arrangements were made sometime since to procure supplies of clothing and shoes, and if our adventures are attended by auspicious gales, the army will be able to get through the winter, with such help as the people at home can, and doubtless will, render.  Their response to the call made upon them last winter was the sublimest incident of the war, and will be recorded in history, as it has already been in "the books" which are kept beyond the sun, and in which all our accounts, whether for good or evil, are entered with an unerring hand.
               
As in the past, so at this time, I would address my appeal chiefly to the women of the Confederacy.  The men have always done their duty in this respect, but the women have done more than their duty—they have helped their husbands, fathers, and brothers to do theirs.  True, they do not enter the field, nor brave the blast of battle, nor use cannon, minnie rifles and swords; and yet the vast army of heroic women who have given their hands and hearts to the cause, have done their parts as well as their brave brothers in the field.  The weapons they employ are the Needle, the Spinning Wheel and the Loom, Words of Encouragement to the weary and faint-hearted, and kind and generous Deeds in the hospital and by the wayside.  With these arms they have done as much to defeat our wicked enemies as an army of resolute men.  If they have not met these enemies in battle, they have met them at the loom and around the couch of the wounded and sick.  If they have not gone to the field in person they have ever been there in spirit.  In every blanket they have given to the soldier, in every pair of socks they have put upon his bleeding feet, in every garment they have woven for his manly limbs, they have been present in the hour of battle, and have given blows for the freedom of their race.  It is to these heroines of the needle, the loom and the spinning wheel that brave veterans who have for three years stood between them and danger, now turn for relief.  Shall their appeal be made in vain?  Not as long as there is a blanket, a yard of carpeting or of cloth, or a sheep skin, that can be spared. . .                                                        P.W.A.
 

Savannah [GA] Republican, November 3, 1863, p. 2, c. 3

An Appeal for Clothing, Shoes and
Blankets for the 26th Ga. Regiment.

                                                                                                       Savannah, Ga., Oct. 19th, 1863.
To the Citizens of Glynn, Wayne, Pierce, Ware, Clinch, Coffee, Appling, Lowndes, [illegible] and Twiggs Counties:
               
I may be pardoned for appealing to you in behalf of my old comrades of the 26th Georgia Regiment—They are nearly all from your counties—they are your kindred—and the time was when you and they held me responsible for their comfort, and applauded the energy and industry that secured all that of right they could claim, and supplied them with every article necessary in the camp and field. . . They are poorly clad—barefooted and almost destitute of blankets.  Shall this state of things be allowed to exist while it is in your power to afford relief?  I think not. . . I have just returned from a campaign with these men—and I write what I know—what I have seen and felt.  I have been with them in the camps, the march and on the battlefield, and though they are too proud to ask you to furnish them, I tell you they need blankets, shoes and clothing and you must supply them—the nights in Virginia are already chilling . . . The Government cannot supply all, and but few of the soldiers who, like Gordon's Brigade, are kept constantly close up in the enemy's front, are furnished with any thing from the remote parts and store houses in the rear.
               
Respectfully your obedient servant,
                                                                                                                     
[Illegible] W. Styles.

 The Daily Intelligencer [Atlanta, Ga.], November 4, 1863, 2, c. 2

Another Appeal to the Women of Georgia.

                                                                                Quartermaster's Department,
                                                                                               
LaGrange, Ga., Nov. 1, 1863.
Editor Intelligencer:
    
           Numerous appeals have already been made and responded to.  The Quartermaster General of the State of Georgia has appealed for "socks."  Gen. Beauregard for "bells," Nitre Bureau for "potash," the Doctors for "poppy seed," and the country for "patriotism."
    
           A few appeals may have required sacrifices.  This one can be met without that, at any rate, by a sacrifice too trifling to deter any from responding.
    
           Have the people at home done everything in their power to advance a cause so sacred and dear to us all?  Have they exhausted every facility to promote the comfort and health of the defenders of the land?  Do they fully realize the destitute condition of our torn and shattered armies?  The noble self-sacrificing soldier who walks his post on the watch tower of liberty?  Do they realize it?  Does the chilling winds of winter, the pelting rains, the miasma of Chicamauga swamps effect only the soldier who suffers under it?  Surely not.  Then only withhold from him, from the only truly patriotic, the patient, the weary, the suffering yet watchful Bulwark of your safety those things which certainly are not necessities?
    
           Can a humane and christian people withhold that which would shield him from disease and death?  Ought they not to suffer a little, a very little inconvenience, if by so doing they furnish absolute necessities to the soldiers?  Will you do your duty when made aware of the necessity?  I believe you will.
    
           Then I tell you the necessity exists.  Thousands of our soldiers are without tents, and worse than that, without *blankets*.  Many of the Georgia troops are supplied by their friends at home.  Think of the thousands who have no homes!  Yet they have been fighting the enemy for over two long years.  They have met him and contested his approach to our borders upon many a hard fought battlefield.  They are still proudly and degantly [sic?] defending our "homes and our fires, the green graves of our sires."
    
           Under such circumstances, in this dark hour of trial, ought there to be a blanket in the house of any citizen of the "Empire State?"  Ought not the churches, the parlors and the bed rooms to be stript of every carpet, if necessary, and hurried to the army?  I think so, and think, besides, that any true-hearted Southern woman will be ashamed to let such articles remain about her premises when she is aware of the necessity to give them up.  I believe there are carpets enough in Georgia to supply the Confederate army with blankets.  They cannot be procured by purchase.  Can I say for you, ladies of Georgia, "They shall be given?"
    
           Then have them cut, lined with cotton cloth, and hemmed.  Forward to any of the following named officers, who will furnish the lining upon application, and receive the hearty "Three cheers!" from the gallant soldiers, and the sincere thanks of a grateful nation. . . .
    
           Let them come, and come quickly, and then let the Atlanta Confederacy, and "such cattle," prate about the incapacity of Gen. Bragg and the President--let them join hand in hand with "croakers" and the "Home Generals."
    
           Let them speak insolently of the President as "serene upon the frigid heights of imperturbable egotism."  Let them discover the "astonishing spectacle of one wing of our army" at one place and the other at another place.  Let them try to create discontent and sow the seeds of discord by referring sneeringly at the "art of war" with Napoleon, and the "art of war" with Bragg and Frederick the Great.  Let them do all this and more besides.  They will find that neither Gen. Bragg nor the President are "toadies" to cater to the whims of "warriors at home."  Give the soldiers the blankets since they have got the "poppy seed" and the "socks," and the "bells," and the "potash," and the "Patriotism," and they will turn a deaf ear to the croakes [sic?], and strive and fight on, and suffer on, until our bleeding country worthy of such heroic patriots is forever freed from the tyranny of so contemptible and so despised a foe.  Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
                                                                                                               
B.  F. Jones,
                                                                                               
Major and Quartermaster.
Papers favorable to the cause please copy and pay charges themselves. 

Savannah [GA] Republican, November 13, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

Covering for the Soldiers.

                The constant demand for blankets for the soldiers, has induced the Lady Managers of the Wayside Home to make arrangements for receiving any donations which the citizens may feel disposed to make for the purpose.  Persons wishing to give their carpets, to be made up into blankets, are notified that they will be received by Capt. Hardee, at the Home.  If already made up, will be so much gained—but if this is not convenient, the ladies will have them made a suitable size; and being desirous to give the employment to the needy women, will be glad of any friends for aiding the work. 

Savannah [GA] Republican, November 18, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

Our Suffering Army—To the Citizens of Savannah.

                We desire to appeal earnestly to our citizens in behalf of suffering Georgians now encamped among the bleak mountains of Tennessee.  The Firs Battalion Georgia Sharpshooters are men for whom we would claim their immediate and [illegible].  In a rigorous climate, exposed to all its inclemencies these cold November days and nights, these brave men are guarding the portals of our homes, all of them without proper provisions for bodily health and comfort, and very many without a shoe or sock on their feet or a blanket to cover them when asleep.  This is more than humanity can bear, and as a necessary consequence they are sickening and dying under the terrible ordeal.  With the hope of relief from home, they have deputed one of their number, Lieut. Molina, to repair to Savannah and make an appeal in their behalf for such comforts as the Government finds it impossible now to provide.  He arrived here yesterday, and that all may fully comprehend the nature of his mission and the necessity for prompt and liberal action on their part, we copy the following official letter from the commander of the Battalion.
                                                                               
Headquarters Wilson's Brigade,
                                                                                               
Near Chattanooga, Nov. 10.
Lieut. Col. G. W. Brent, A. A. G.:
               
Colonel—I have the honor very respectfully to request that Lieut. M. Molina, Co. D, 1st Batt. Ga. S. S., be granted permission to visit Savannah, Ga., for fifteen days, for the purpose of procuring from the various Relief Associations (and by voluntary subscriptions) at that place and its vicinity, blankets, shoes, and other articles of clothing, for the men of the 1st Battalion, Ga. S. S.
               
As Commandant proper of that corps, I have respectfully to state that every possible exertion has been made to procure from government (through the proper channels and in conformity with Regulations) the articles referred to, without success.  The men are in a destitute and suffering condition, being without blankets, having lost them, with their knapsacks, in the first retreat from Jackson, Miss., and a number barefooted.—This battalion was raised and organized in the city of Savannah, is well known and thought of there, and I feel quite assured that Lieut. Molina's visit to that city in behalf of the destitute soldiers of the 1st Battalion Ga. S. S. will be productive of much benefit to them, enabling him to procure covering for at least a great number of the men, if not the whole.
               
Trusting that the commanding General will grant the permission applied for and thus relieve the actual suffering of the soldiers of the 1st Battalion Ga. S. S.
               
I have the honor to be, Colonel,
                               
Very respectfully your ob't ser't,
                               
[Signed]                 Arthur [illegible],

Major 1st Batt. Ga. S. S., Com'dg Wilson's Brigade. 

                Here is the picture; and now can our people look upon it unmoved?  Will they not come to the relief of these brave men, and do it without a day's delay?  How can it be done?  We will tell them.  To procure shoes at this time is out of the question, but such articles as socks, thick underclothes, and covering are at our command, and should be freely offered, even though it should cost us something of luxury, or even of comfort.  Those who remain quietly at their homes should certainly be willing to divide with the poor soldier who shivers under the cold blasts of winter for the protection of those homes.  Blankets are not to be had, but is there a man or woman in Savannah who will consent to enjoy the luxury of a carpet whilst these brave defenders are without a covering for their bodies?  We hope there is not one.  Then let some of the thousands of carpets in Savannah be taken up and devoted to saving the soldiers from exposure and death.  They can be readily converted into blankets of convenient size, and those who are unable to do the work can be accommodated by sending their carpets to either of the editors, who will see that they are made up and got ready for shipment.
               
The ladies can certainly furnish a few hundred pairs of socks in the course of a week and if the Government Quartermaster will supply the osnaburgs we engage to have it speedily converted into warm underclothing.  Let us move straightway in the matter, and move effectually.

 Savannah [GA] Republican, November 19, 1863, 2, c. 2
               
The Sharpshooters.—Quartermaster Hirsch informs us that he has on hand an ample supply of under-clothing which he will turn over to Lieut. Molina for his needy comrades.  So far very good.  Now let the ladies send forward the socks and the house-keepers their carpets, and we shall be able to secure out boys in the mountains at least against freezing.

Clarke County [AL] Journal, December 3, 1863, p. 2, c. 3

To the Women of Alabama.

                The army of the West, now facing Rosecranz on the banks of the Tennessee, has displayed its gallantry on many a field of blood.  It has endured privation without complaint, and born hardships without a murmur.  . . .  What our soldiers most need are blankets and socks.  Without your aid they cannot be supplied.  Must I say more?  What stronger appeal can I make to your patriotism than through your love of Husband, Son and Brother?  Our cause is consecrated by the union of all holy tries—love of country—love of home—love of liberty.  In all ages of the world, Woman's inspiration, or woman's failure to inspire, has won or lost Empires. . . .              
                                                                                                    Geo. W. Jones, Major & Q.M.      
I have made arrangements to receive and forward such blankets and socks as the ladies may contribute under the above call.  Let each package be legibly marked to the Probate Judge of the County in which contributors reside.                   
                                                                                                        J. D. Brandon, Captain,  
                                                                                                          and Post Q.M., 9th Dist. 

Savannah [GA] Republican, December 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 2
               
The Alabama Legislature has passed a joint resolution to cut up the carpets in the State House, to make blankets for the soldiers.

 Savannah [GA] Republican, December 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

Carpets for Blankets.

                Mr. Editor:--We take the liberty of publishing the following letter not merely for the sake of inciting others to perform their duty to our army fully and at once, but to correct an error that obtains to some extent in reference to the fitness of carpets for blankets, and which, when corrected, will furnish, we trust, very many more blankets for our suffering soldiers, now being rendered unfit for our defense by not being provided with the means of enduring the rigors of winter among the mountains.—There is but one kind of carpeting not adapted for covering for the soldier, and that is the Brussels.  All other kinds subserve a most excellent substitute for blankets.  This is said to be the experience of our men in Virginia.  We trust no one will be hereafter deterred from sending what he ought to spare, without serious discomfort to his family.  Our countrymen must sacrifice, in this hour of peril and of trial, their ease and much of their comfort, or we will hear that cry, more fearful than the knell of death, ringing in our ears, "woe to the conquered,"                                                                                 John H. Mead, Auditor.


--------

                                                                                                            Greensboro' Nov. 30, 1863.
Mr. J. H. Mead, Auditor—
               
Dear sir:  Last night here was very cold, the first very cold and unpleasant night we have had so far this fall or winter.  I could have slept comfortably under the quilts and other bed clothing we have, (having given most all our blankets to poor soldiers), but for the constant recollection how our poor soldiers about Chattanooga after hard fighting can brook these cold nights.  I could not get it out of mind, and hence a sleepless night.  I resoled to look and see to-day what I could do for their comfort.  I have already given most all my bed blankets.  I have on a floor a pretty good old Scotch carpet I [could] take up and do without, but, then I see carpets do not do so well.  Besides this, I have a linen crumb cloth to my table.  This will make four good blankets.  I write to know if you can make the carpet avail.  I have no lining—which I see is recommended—but your Society could do this if I sent them to you.  Do let me know if you can make these things serviceable to our poor soldiery, and I will send to you, as I know you, and know my pittance will go through you to our defenders of our soil.  Oh, how can any one withhold from these calls, if anything can be given to aid and help our brave boys.  Drop me a note and I will respond.
                                                                                                               
Yours truly,
                                                                                                               
Jno. Cunningham.
 

Charleston Mercury, December 10, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
The Women of the South.--The army correspondent of the Chicago Journal thus speaks of the Southern women:
               
I shall never be done admiring the patriotic faith and undying devotion of the loyal women of the land, but I must tell you that the rebel women of the South are worthy in everything but the sacred cause of their Northern sisters.  There is nothing they will not surrender with a smile; the gemmed ring, the diamond bracelet, the rich wardrobe.  They cut up the rich carpets for the soldiers' blankets without a sigh; they take the fine linen from their persons for the bandages.  When 400 of Longstreet's men came up to Nashville, prisoners of war, about the roughest, dirtiest, wildest fellows the sun ever shone on, and a flight of stairs in the building they occupied fell, killing and wounding a large number of them, you should have seen the fair young traitoresses come forth from old aristocratic mansions, bearing restoratives and delicacies in their hands, mingling in the dingy crowd, wiping away the blood with their white handkerchiefs, and uttering words of cheer; should have seen them doing this, with hundreds of Union soldiers all around, and smiling back upon the blackguards of rebels as they left.  But in all there was a defiant air, a pride in their humanity strange to see.  Of a truth they carried it off grandly.  And almost all those girls were in mourning for dead rebels, brothers, lovers, friends, whom these same girls had sneered into treason and driven into rebellion, and billowed all the  South with their graves, and the least they could do was to wear black for them and flaunt black from the window blinds.  Clothed be their souls in sackcloth!  I said they were worthy of their sisters of the North, in all but a righteous cause, but I said wrong.  There is a bitterness, there are glimpses of the Pythoness, that makes you shrink from them.  But they are fearfully in earnest; they are almost grand in self sacrifice.

 Memphis Daily Appeal [Atlanta, Ga.], December 21, 1863, p. 1, c. 3

Blankets for the Soldiers.

                                                                                            Office of the Georgia Relief and Hospital
                                                                                                      
Association, December 17, 1863.
To the People of Georgia:
    
           In view of the fact, now well ascertained, that our soldiers cannot be supplied during the present winter with a sufficient number of blankets, the Georgia Relief and Hospital Association, by its executive committee, have determined to try and supply this want to some extent by the manufacture of what are called comforts or comforters.  These can be made out our thinnest factory cloth, padded with bats of carded cotton, and quilted.  The cloth should be as light as possible, and the cloth not too thick, otherwise the article will be heavy for transportation.  Even with these precautions they may not be easily transported by the soldier, and may be soon lost; still we hope that with the increased experience of our troops, this may not be an invincible inexperience; [sic?] and that at all events, they may secure warmth for the present winter.  If no more be effected, this result will amply repay the cost and trouble.
    
           The undersigned have been appointed a committee for the purpose of invoking the aid of our people in this work.  We have already sought and found the assistance of the ladies of Augusta and its vicinity, whose energy during this unhappy war has been as untiring as their patriotism is ardent.  These ladies, according to their custom, have responded to our call with an alacrity which has inspired our hearts with thankfulness and our minds with increased zeal and which encourages us to call upon patriotic citizens, especially the women, in all parts of our State, and invite them, wherever such cloth and cotton batting can be procured, to unite with us in this enterprise, this effort to protect our gallant defenders from the cold of the winter's night.  The officers of the Augusta factory in a spirit of the most liberal patriotism, have offered to furnish us with the materials upon very low terms, and in such quantities as will enable us if all will assist who can do so, to send forward to the army several thousands of these comforts in a week or ten days.  Other factories in our State will do the same, we doubt not, if application be made.  The articles when finished, can be sent to our rooms in this city, and will be immediately forwarded to the troops.  A vigorous effort on the part of our people can thus almost entirely remedy the grievance which we desire to remove, certainly among our own soldiers.  Past experience teaches us not to doubt but that this effort will be made elsewhere in Georgia with energy like to that which inspired it here.
    
           The cloth used by us here is thinner than shirting.  Shirting will do--and is cut seven and a half or eight feet long by six feet wide.  It would be better if dyed some color, but we have no time to wait for this to be done.
    
           All packages sent to be forwarded by the association should be addressed W. H. Potter, General Superintendent, Augusta, Georgia.                                H. Starnes, 

Memphis Daily Appeal [Atlanta, Ga.], December 23, 1863, p. 2, c. 4

Clothing for the Soldiers.

                                                                                             Cartersville, Ga., December 21, 1863.
Editors Appeal:  The fact is now notorious that many of the soldiers in the army of Tennessee are destitute of clothing, and are likely to suffer during the winter.  Several communications on the subject have already appeared in the papers, but I am not aware that any general steps have been taken to meet the demands of the occasion.  A recent visit to the camps has satisfied me, if I wanted evidence, that there is need of all that can be done to make the condition of the soldier tolerable, and to enable him to meet the expectations of the public.  There soldiers have already drenched the soil of Georgia with their blood, in defense of the people, their homes and property, and to them and their gallantry they owe all that they now possess.  These soldiers, under grievous disadvantages, still present themselves as a wall of fire between the people of Georgia and their cruel and remorseless enemy.  No appeal can be more eloquent than the simple facts themselves, and surely will not go unheeded by a generous people.  Let it be remembered that among these troops are a large number who are cut off from their own States and peoples by the occupation of the enemy, and who have no resource except upon the general Government.
    
           To aid in meeting these wants of the soldiers, the ladies of Cartersville and vicinity have organized themselves into an association to manufacture comforts and socks, and a liberal fund has already been subscribed by a number of the gentlemen to inaugurate the business and to purchase material.  It is believed that comforts, made of thin domestic, stuffed with cotton, will make the cheapest substitute for blankets, and can be manufactured with great expedition.  Socks, made of cotton yarn, will answer a valuable purpose, and can be supplied in great numbers.
    
           Now I desire you to bring this subject to the notice of your readers by publishing this communication, and by such other suggestions as may occur to you, in order to impress upon all the importance of the object in view.  The ladies, I am sure, are ready to work, and surely the gentlemen can afford to contribute the amount of money required.  We must all act in this great struggle if we desire to save the country from ruin.        Amicus.
                                                                                                                               
C. J. Jenkins,
 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, December 23, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
A number of the sick and wounded of Longstreet's corps were left at Resaca, Ga.  It would appear from a letter to the Atlanta Intelligencer from one of their number that they are almost entirely destitute of clothing and utensils.  He says we are here in the woods, without tents, almost without cooking utensils, axes; many bare-footed, ragged, and without blankets.  Last night a terrible storm of rain, hail and wind passed over us, putting out our fires and drenching us to the skin.  Allowances are made by the men on account of our novel situation, but we do think that the shoeless should be shod and those without blankets should be furnished.  These heroes of many victorious fields deserve this at the hands of their country.  There are about 1,000 of Longstreet's men here.  Cannot some liberal hearted, patriotic gentleman come up this way and relieve us?  We are now commanded by Col. Bowles, of the 40th Alabama.

Savannah [GA] Republican, December 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 3
               
State Carpets for the Soldiers.—The Montgomery Advertiser states that, in accordance with the requirements of an act of the General Assembly of that State at the recent session, the carpets in the rooms of the State capitol in that city are being taken up for the use of the soldiers from Alabama.  They are to be used in lieu of blankets, which cannot be procured.
 

1864 

Clarke County [AL] Journal, January 7, 1864, p. 2, c. 3 
We wonder if every body who snug themselves under warm blankets at night ever say their prayers in that position, and if they remember in their prayers the blanketless sleepers around Dalton!

Memphis Daily Appeal [Atlanta, Ga.], January 28, 1864, p. 1, c. 3
Mrs. S. C. Law, at the head of a delegation of ladies, passed through our city last evening, in charge of five hundred blankets and fifteen hundred pair of socks, designed for the needy soldiers of Gen. Johnston's army.  This munificent donation to the gallant men of the Tennessee army, is the free will offering of the ladies of Columbus, Georgia, who have shown themselves untiring in their efforts to provide for the wants and comforts of our war-worn veterans.  Mrs. Law has been an active, energetic and efficient worker in the cause since the commencement of the war, and will be remembered as President of the Society of the Southern Mothers of Memphis, in which capacity she acted with great efficiency until that place fell into the possession of the enemy.  Her zeal in the cause, as well as that of her co-laborers, cannot be too highly commended.

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, March 23, 1864, p. 3, c. 2-3.
                                                                
                                Headq'rs Granbury's Brigade, }
                                                                
                                Dalton, Ga., March 4, 1864.   }
Mrs. A. J. Lyle, President, Ladies Aid Society:
               
Madam:  I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 23d Feb. accompanying the blankets sent to my command "on behalf of the Masonic Lodge of Cusseta."  The Texas soldiers of this army, debarred from receiving such comforts from their own families, accept this testimonial with the liveliest gratification.  It causes them to feel that while cut off from communication with their own loved ones by the fortunes of war, there are still friends on this side the great river, whose warm hearts appreciate the sacrifices they have made, and whose fair hands are ready to minister to the wants of the exiled soldier.
               
Please accept, madam, for the noble society you represent, and the honored fraternity who made the donation, the assurance of our high appreciation of the timely gift, and believe me,
               
Very respectfully,
                               
Your obedient servant,
                                
                H. B. Granbury,
                                
                                Brig. Gen. Texas Brigade.

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, April 6, 1864, p. 1, c. 1

Yankee Atrocities in North Alabama.

                . . . On January 25th, Gen. Roddy, with a small portion of his command, attacked the forces of Lieut. Col. Phillips, who were encamped near and in the grove of Mrs. Coleman, the widow of Judge Daniel Coleman, deceased.  The enemy's pickets were driven into the encampment, when they, with those of the forces who were in camp, took shelter behind the dwelling house of Mrs. Coleman.  They fired a few rounds and fled in perfect consternation. . . . The marble slabs to the bureaus and wash-stands, were broken into pieces, mirrors were shattered—handsome Brussels carpets cut up into saddle-blankets—beds dragged out into camp with all the bed clothing, including the finest blankets and Marseilles quilts. . . . 

Charleston Mercury, June 6, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
Little steps towards Southern independence.--The following list of manufactories of general utility, not heretofore made in the South, is copied from exchanges within the past few days, says the Charlotte Bulletin.  It shows that our people are really making some progress towards the independence that we have heard talked of so much.  We have not included the cotton and woollen mills dotted here and there in all the States, or the iron establishments, or the Government works for making arms, powder, etc.
               
We have not doubt there are many other establishments of which we have seen no notice, that are adding to the resources of the country, by making articles that we have heretofore depended upon the Yankees to furnish us: . . .
               
Cotton Batting Factory at Charlotte, N. C.
               
Blanket Manufactory at Montgomery, Ala.  

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, June 29, 1864, p. 4, c. 5

The Montgomery
Hat and Blanket Manufactory,
Corner of Perry and Jefferson Sts.,

Is now prepared to manufacture Hats.  Also, will make Wool rolls, so necessary now for knitting Socks, etc., for our Soldiers.
Particular attention given to orders.

Galveston Weekly News, September 14, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
                                                                                                           
Hempstead, Sept. 3d, 1864.
               
Ed. News.—I send you by this morning's train a specimen of bagging manufactured here from common moss.  The warp is of cotton, and the filling moss.  Its superiority consists in the fact that the moss will not rot, however much it is exposed to the weather, and all it costs is the gathering and rotting.  A small improvement on the fabric would make comfortable carpets, negro blankets, &c.
               
It is made by Mrs. Lee, of this vicinity, and sent to you for inspection.
               
Very truly yours,                                                                  F. J. Cooke.
               
[The above letter explains itself.  We are not a judge of such things.  We invite those who are to call and examine it.—Ed.]

 1865  

[Little Rock] National Democrat, January 7, 1865, p. 2, c. 4
               
We have received Mobile papers of the 17th, (Saturday) from which we extract the following intelligence: . . .
               
The Augusta Constitutionalist states that seventeen car loads of English blankets recently passed up the road direct for Lee's army.
                                                                                                                                
        [Memphis Bulletin. 

Galveston Weekly News, March 8, 1865, p. 2, c. 2
                                                                
                Headquarters, &c., Near Colqeut [Colquet?], La.,
                                                                
                                February 25th, 1865.
               
Ed. News:-- . . There is not one soldier in every three of the rank and file of this division, that has a change of clothing, and there is not an average of one good blanket to every man in the command throughout and, at least, fifty men are now absolutely barefooted, and many more so nearly that they suffer intensely from the cold biting frosts that we have even in Louisiana.  We have not tents or cooking utensils, but we care not for tents, pots, skillets, frying pans, &c.  We can do as we have done before, bake our bread on boards and roast our beef on bricks. . . .
               
Respectfully,                                                                                        Wallingham.
 

Montgomery Weekly Advertiser, April 15, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
There is a blanket and hat manufactory now in operation at Jackson, Miss.  The blankets are very superior, being made of wool felted on thin cotton goods.  They seem to be much warmer than woven blankets, though scarcely so durable.  The hats are quite stylish, and will wear till a man tires of them. 

[Marshall] Texas Republican, May 5, 1865, p. 2, c. 5-6

Five Days in the Enemy's Lines.

                A lady, residing in Montgomery, S. C., who was virtually in the enemy's lines for five days, writes her experience to a friend in Augusta as follows:
               
Having an opportunity, I thought I would give you some faint idea of our experience with the Yankees.  'Twas on Wednesday, Feb. 8th, that we first took alarm, hearing that Kilpatrick's cavalry, 5,000 strong, were but seven miles distant.  . . . All our blankets, quilts, bowls and all the pillow cases were used as bags to remove provisions.  Great destruction in clothing, dresses torn up, etc.  Hardly a handkerchief in the house, and but one comb to comb our hair.
               
Yesterday and the day before parties of Confederates rode up to the house; you cannot imagine how enthusiastically they were greeted.  We have so little provision that we are on half rations.  Think of it, for five days and nights we dared not even loosen our dresses.

 Galveston Weekly News, May 31, 1865, p. 4, c. 4
                                                                                                               
[For the News.
To the Soldiers of Texas.
               
Capt. E. W. Taylor has been greatly censured by you for not "issuing" the goods which were taken from his office on last Tuesday.  It is due to Capt. Taylor, and to the truth, that I should state that I received from the Rio Grande 84 bales and 25 boxes of dry goods, including gray cloth, flannel, domestic and tweeds, and that I purchased from the steamer "Flamingo" 65 bales of blankets, 5 large cases of thread, and 20,000 yards of gray flannel, all of which were turned over to Capt. Taylor only ten days before the excitement in Houston.  Most of the goods, taken from his office, were the goods he had just received.
               
I make this statement in justice to a faithful officer.  Where I am known, the statement will be accepted as true.                                              B. R. Davis,
               
Receiving and Distributing Officer, for Goods from the Rio Grande and by the Blockade.