Buttons:
Articles from Civil War Era Newspapers
 

[LITTLE ROCK] OLD-LINE DEMOCRAT, January 19, 1860, p. 3, c. 1
               
Capital Guards.—This newly organized company is rapidly increasing in members, and gaining in strength every day.  We can now truly say we have a military company in our midst which will be an ornament to our city, while if her interests are in danger, it will prove of service to her rights.  We had the pleasure of examining the cloth out of which the uniforms are to be made, and in our humble judgment will equal any in the South.  The coats are dark, navy blue, single breasted, buttoned full to the neck; gilt buttons with a device of the Capitol upon them. . .

MOBILE DAILY REGISTER, February 3, 1860, p. 3, c. 2

Just Received!
1,000 pieces Black Silk Velvet Ribbon,

All Widths, from 1-16 inch to 1/8-yard, which will be sold at reduced prices.
Also, a supply of black silk velvet buttons, various sizes.

                                                                                                               
H. & M. Marx,
                                                                                                               
73 Dauphin Street.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, April 5, 1860, p. 2, c. 6

Fine Gold Jewelry!
New Styles Just Received!

. . . Bracelets, Necklaces, Chatalain [sic] Chains and Charms, Brooches, Ear Rings, Finger Rings, Buttons, Sinks, Chains, Seals, Keys, Breast Pins, Pens, Pencils, &c. &c. . . .
                                                                                                                          
L.  E. Welch. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 10, 1860, p. 3, c. 7

Latest Styles of
Dress Goods
For Spring and Summer.

. . . Dress Buttons of all descriptions; . . . 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 10, 1860, p. 1, c. 3-4

Correspondence of the Mercury.
Fashion Letter.

                New York, July 1.--There is positive danger of New York's forgetting its morality (which we all know is unquestionable) and becoming dissipated, for our generally "stale, flat and unprofitable days" at this period are filled with furious excitement.  The Great Easterners' star waned, and was merged into, and out-dazzled by the Great Eastern's arrival the day previous. . . .
               
Perhaps, mes amis, you will be glad to learn that aprons are really revived from too long oblivion, and are to be fashionable.  Really elegant ones have made their appearance.  I have seen one of dark blue silk, with two deep lace flounces and tiny black lace pockets, barred with narrow black velvet ribbon.  Another was of heavy black silk, trimmed with lilac velvet ribbon in three rows, the outer edge having a fulling of black lace.  Medallion buttons of lilac velvet, in one row on each side, and a heavy cord and tassel to confine the apron at the waist.  Still another variety was gored and trimmed with bias box-plaiting; this was fastened at the waist by a belt, and a long floating bias silk sash trimmed the same.  Another was of lilac silk, trimmed with a quantity of pinked ruffles, the little pockets crescent-shaped and trimmed with black lace and medallions.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 10, 1860, p. 1, c. 3-4 

Fashion Letter.
Correspondence of the Mercury.

                                                                                                                    New York, August 7.
. . .           Skirts are to be set on the waist in double and treble box plaits.  Corsage generally high and plain, trimmed with macaroni or medallion buttons, of which a beautiful variety are being imported.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 14, 1860, p. 4, c. 1

Our New York Correspondence.
Fashion Letter.

                                                                                                                New York, September 8.
. . .           Flowers are next akin to bonnets; flowers and feathers, of which the most exquisitely beautiful specimens are to be seen at the sales rooms of R. T. Wilde & Co., where we can linger, reveling in beauty, for hours.  Strawberries and blackberries in bright gold, as well as wheat half buried in golden bronzed leaves, are a specialite here; also, large all-hued velvet buttons, covered with sparkling jet, or knotted with strings of jet or wax beads for trimming.   

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 11, 1860, p. 1, c. 3-4.

Fashion in New York
Our New York Correspondence.

                                                                                                                    New York, October 8.
. . . While I pause for a reply, I must tell you about a superb peignoir, called the "Montague," which I have had the pleasure of admiring at the establishment of Madame Demoriss Goodall, 338 Canal-street, which is the newest of the new styles of morning robes, composed of maise-colored silk, gored skirt, the front made entirely in puffings on each side the front breadth, a narrow double pinked ruffle in black silk, a broad black ribbon set on plain around the hem, surmounted by one narrow ruffle, very open and deep sleeve in a point, slashed across the fore-arm with black cable cord, the same ruffled trimming going around the neck of the corsage, which is closed to the throat, and buttoned with black silk buttons to the belt, where the buttons are continued down each side of the front breadth. . . .
               
Zouave jackets, pretty and fashionable as ever, are worn with vests, as usual, of black or gray moire antique, silk or velvet, with pretty buttons. . . .
               
The new style "Japanese sets," of embroidery and linen for collar and sleeves, terminate in lappets at the throat and across the back of the wrist by a jewelled [sic] or gold button or slide to suit the fancy or purse.  Pretty sleeve buttons can easily be detached from the links and become converted into these new style fastenings for the cross-over sets. . . .
               
The capes to bonnets are always silk or velvet.  As I mentioned in my last, there is a furore for gold ornaments:  stars, buckles, slides, buttons, bees and butterflies, golden wheat and berries, gold grapes and gold pins and belts, gold tinsel, lace fringe and braid.  It is unnecessary to warn my fair readers that the "stagey" [sic] effect of this tawdry glitter will very soon lose caste among those of good taste.  Still, a little of this species of ornamentation, mixed judiciously in dark face trimming, is rather becoming and pretty. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 20, 1860, p. 3, c. 5

Ball and Opera Costume for Gentlemen.

                Genio C. Scott publishes in the Home Journal, of New York, the following directions to gentlemen, relative to the appropriate ball and opera costumes:
               
Habit Noire Habille--Black Dress Coat.  Waist of medium length; skirt extending to the bend of the knee, and very narrow; sleeves very large at the scye, with very full sleeve-heads, and tapering regularly to a modest size at the hand; rather short and cuffless; collar with M ends, short and very light; lapels rather wide, with small holes to correspond with the small buttons, and the breast formed to roll down to the second button from the bottom; breast facings of silk, extending out beyond the under lapel to near the button-holes, disclosing a very narrow lapel above the turn. . . .
               
Gilet Soie Noire--Transparent Blanc--Black Silk Vest--White Under Vest.--Plain roll-collar vest of black silk, rolling very low to correspond with the roll of the breast of the coat.  Under vest of white silk or marseilles; (pique,) cut double breasted, with a roll collar, rolling low to conform with the outer vest, and double breasted, to form a more tasteful fit than can be done where two rows of buttons come in contact; but there are only three buttons and holes on each forepart of the under vest.  The roll of the breast of the under vest discloses from a half inch to an inch of the fold projecting beyond the crease row or fold of the breast of the outer vest.   

[DES ARC, ARK.] THE CONSTITUTIONAL UNION, November 16, 1860, p. 4, c. 7
               
"Minute Men" in South Carolina.—As an offset to the "Wide Awakes" of the North, "Minute Men" are organizing in all the principal districts of South Carolina.  The Charleston Mercury says:
               
"Their object is to form an armed body of men, and to join in with our fellow-citizens, now forming in this our sister States as 'Minute Men,' whose duty is to army, equip and drill, and be ready for any emergency that may arise in the present perilous position of Southern States.  In Kershaw, Abbeville, and Richland districts the organization is already complete and powerful, embracing the flower of the youth, and led on by the most influential citizens.  The badge adopted is a blue rosette—two and a half inches in diameter, with a military button in the centre, to be worn upon the side of the hat."

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [MEMPHIS, TN], November 17, 1860, p. 1, c. 1

Chit-Chat on New York Fashions for November.

. . .           Nearly all the walking dresses are made with plain skirts, trimmed en tablier, or fastened up the front.  Sometimes one plait is fastened under each arm, and two behind.   Gimp trimmings for dresses are made in great and elegant varieties.  Aiguillettes, buttons, bows with square ends, acorns trimmed with lace and enlivened with black beads and flat, graduated ornaments, both for bodies and skirts, are all in demand.   

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 13, 1860, p. 1, c. 4-5

Fashion in New York.
Our New York Correspondence.

                                                                                                               New York, December 8.
. . .           Large medallion buttons are as much worn as ever, ornamenting sleeves, corsage and skirts; also, braiding with gold and black cording, a la militaire.
               
Some waists are made, lining and material gathered full together in a belt.  This is very ugly and unbecoming; one resembles, in this style, a fat and very much overgrown baby.  Waists are also made with yokes, but the most proper style is plain, the side seams and front plentifully trimmed with buttons or braided.
               
Sleeves are pretty, puffed half way, and tight to the wrist, the outer portion trimmed with large buttons to the elbow; or sleeves can be made rather full, with a deep pointed cuff extending back from the wrist, trimmings of velvet bands or galoons, in true military style. . . .
               
Cloaks and sacques are to be seen corded with white; in beaver or pilot cloth, they are ornamented with large whitish horn buttons.  They are rather pretty when the white cording is used up on silk, velvet or satin wraps, and really distingue. . . 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 19, 1860, p. 2, c. 1
               
Cockades.--The following is the description of the cockades adopted in Maryland and Virginia:
               
Virginia.--This consists of a double rosette of blue silk, with a pendant of lemon color, the whole fastened together by a gilt button, on which appears in relief the arms of Virginia, with the name of the State and its motto encircling it.  The motto is--Sic semper tyrannis.
               
Maryland.--This cockade is formed of a double rosette of blue silk, with blue pendants, and fastened the same as that of Virginia, with the State button, with the simple word "Maryland" beneath the arms. 

[FAYETTEVILLE, ARK.] THE ARKANSIAN, January 5, 1861, p. 2, c. 6

All About the Southern Cockades.

                The Herald has been favored with a view of the secession cockades now so extensively worn by the fire-eaters of the South.  Perhaps our readers may be curious to know what these badges of treason are:
               
South Carolina.—The cockade is made of three layers of very dark cloth, stitched at the edges and fastened together by a gilt button, on which the following appears in relief:  In the center is the "Palmetto," with two arrows (crossed,) and fastened together at the point of crossing with a bow know of ribbon.  The following is the  motto around the button:  Animous opibusque  parati—"Ready with our minds and means."
               
Virginia.—This consists of a double rosette of blue silk, with a pendant of lemon color, the whole fastened together by a gilt button on which appear in relief the arms of Virginia, with the name of the State and its motto encircling it.  Its motto is "Sic Semper Tyrannis."
               
Maryland.—The cockade is formed of a double rosette of blue silk, with blue pendants, and fastened the same as that of Virginia, with the State button, and the single world "maryland" beneath the arms.
               
The Union Cockade.—This is also a double rosette, the center one being of red silk, the inner one of white silk, and the pendants of blue.  The gilt button that fastens the whole together shows the eagle of America, surrounded by the stars of the United States.

CHARLESTON MERCURY, January 14, 1861, p. 1, c. 3-4

The Fashions.
Our New York Correspondence.

                                                                                                       New York, January 11, 1861.
. . .           There is little change since my last bulletin in the making up of dresses; in evening or ball dresses, or even where a skirt is required to form a trail, small gores can be introduced in the bottom of the under skirt, beneath the one deep flounce.  Skirts are still set on in treble box plaits or deep hollow plaits in heavy dresses, such as Ottoman velours and plain poplins.  The Empress style is still observed of having the front nearly plain, with the plaits set back, and a row of buttons from the throat to the hem.  An improvement on the Jockey sleeve, introduced in Paris, has been shown me.  The seam on the outside of the arm is continued quite to the shoulder, a cable cord fastened down the entire length, finishing with a large button; the turned back cuff is plainly rounded on the under part, and divided in points on the upper, each point fastened down by a button; at the top of the sleeve is a crocheted flat button, with tags, a sort of epaulette.  Guipure medallion buttons graduated are very elegant trimmings for a rich heavy silk; the sleeves and corsage should be trimmed with guipure lace to correspond.
               
The Garibaldi jacket is still as popular and piquant as ever.  These are made in front like a waist, a small basque or coatee, gradually widening back from the hips.  They are buttoned, generally closely, with gold buttons, and either trimmed with black and gold gimp, or black cloth or velvet, or braided with gold cord, if of scarlet cloth. . . .
               
Little gentlemen look very canny in the fashionable Hieland costume; the gay tartan skirts short and full, the velvet tunic scarf crossing over one shoulder and fastened at the belt with the buckle, goat-skin pouch and jewelled [sic] buttons in the shape of thistles, the round Glengarry cap with the single heron's plume, and warm velvet leggins. [sic] 

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, January 30, 1861, p. 3, c. 3
               
N. C. Military Buttons.—We call attention to the advertisement of the Captain of the Goldsboro' Rifles, offering for sale North Carolina Military Buttons, at 33 per cent. less than they can be purchased elsewhere.  We have received specimens of both the large and small button, and unhesitatingly pronounce them very handsome. 

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, January 30, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

N. C. Military Buttons.

                The "Goldsboro Rifles" having procured a complete sett of Dies of the State Arms, are prepared to furnish Buttons for all the North Carolina Military Companies, at 33 per cent less than they can be purchased elsewhere.
               
All applications must be made to the Captain.
                                                                                                                                               
M. D. Craton,
                                                                                                                                               
Goldsboro, N. C.

 CHARLESTON MERCURY, February 15, 1861, p. 1, c. 4-5

The Fashions.
Our New York Correspondence.

                                                                                                       New York, February 9th, 1861.
. . .           The Vandyke or double-breasted corsage finds much favor.  In very rich material, as velvet, par exemple, the revers are faced with silk or satin to correspond with the sleeve linings, which it is unnecessary to state should be white; colored silk linings are in very bad taste.  The part laid over, as in gentlemen's vests, if pointed, can be fastened with a medallion button. . . .
               
French sacques and Garibaldi wraps are very fashionable of black reps silk, very heavy, or cloth, corded, bound or trimmed with white.--The sleeves are exceedingly long, and finished off at the pointed end, which quite reaches the bottom of the skirt, with a large tassel.  The latter style is very much ornamented with buttons. . . .
               
Gimps and braids, long ago obsolete, are now resuscitated, and every conceivable variety in the way of crochet buttons "large as a platter," graduating to a sixpence; chenille buckles dotted with jet or gold; slides which you are told are made of Roman pearls, and which you must presume to doubt, are laid in the centre of velvet bows, dozens of which are to ornament the front breadth of a dress, or the gores, if gored it be; medallions of silk surrounded by lace and pendant chenille tassels; in short, there is no end of the vagaries of the present style of rather bizarre ornamentation. 

[DES ARC, ARK.] THE CONSTITUTIONAL UNION, April 5, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
Cavalry Company.
               
This corps, at their last meeting, adopted as their name, The Des Arc Rangers.  On last Saturday they paraded through our streets, for the first time, in their uniforms, presenting quite a soldier-like appearance.  The uniform adopted by the Rangers is a red flannel shirt, with a deep blue breast and back, blue cuffs and black velvet collar, with three rows of brass buttons in front; black pants, with red stripes up the sides; United States cavalry fatigue cap, with ostrich plume, with colt's Navy repeaters and United States dragoon sabers.

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, June 5, 1861, p. 2, c. 3

The Confederate Army Uniform.

                We have been furnished with a description of the uniform adopted for the Confederate Army, as follows:
               
Coat.—Short tunic of cadet grey cloth, double breasted, with two rows of buttons over the breast, the rows two inches apart at the waist and widening toward the shoulders.  Suitable for cavalry as well as Infantry. . . .
               
Buttons.—For a General and staff officer the buttons will be of bright gilt convex, rounded at the edge—a raised eagle at the centre, surrounded by thirteen stars.  Exterior diameter of large sized button, 1 inch; of small size, ½ inch.
               
For officers of the corps of engineers the same button is to be used, except that in the lace of eagle and stars, there will be a raised "E" in German text.
               
For officers of artillery, infantry, riflemen and cavalry, the buttons will be a plain gilt convex, with a large raised letter in the centre—A for artillery, I for infantry, &c.  The exterior diameter of large size button, seven-eights of an inch; small size, ½ inch.
               
For all enlisted men of artillery, a large A raised in the centre of a three-quarter inch button.
               
For all enlisted men, the same as for artillery, except that the number of the regiment will be substituted for the letter A.

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, June 5, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Five Thousand dollars worth of
New Ready Made Clothing,
and Military Goods,
just received from
Richmond, Virginia.

                Which we were compelled to pay cash for.  We offer the same at a small advance for cash, and to our credit customers, who have paid their bills promptly. . . .

Also,

                A Large Lot of Military Buttons, . . .
                                                                                                               
E. L. Harding.
june5-tf

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 6, 1861, p. 1, c. 4

Uniform of the Confederate States Army.

                The War Department of the Confederate States has recently adopted the following uniform for our army:
               
The coat is to be a short tunic of cadet grey cloth, double-breasted, with two rows of buttons down the breast, two inches apart at the waist, and widening toward the shoulders.—The pantaloons are to be made of sky blue cloth, full in the legs.  The buttons to be of plain gilt, convex form, three-quarters of an inch in diameter.  The different arms of the service are to be distinguished by the color of the trimmings blue for infantry, red for artillery, and yellow for cavalry.  In the artillery service the buttons are to be stamped with a letter A, but in infantry and cavalry the buttons will bear only the number of the regiment.
               
For the Generals and the officers of his staff the dress will be of dark blue cloth, trimmed with gold; for the medical department, black cloth, with gold and velvet trimming.  All badges of distinction are to be marked upon the sleeves and collars.  Badges of distinguished rank, on the collar only.  For a Brigadier General, three large stars; for a Colonel, two large stars; for a Lieutenant Colonel, one large star; for a Major, one small star and horizontal bar; for a Captain, three small stars; for a First Lieutenant, two small stars; for a Second Lieut. one small star.
               
For a General and staff officers the buttons will be of bright gilt, convex, rounded at the edge; a raised eagle at the centre, surrounded by thirteen stars.  Exterior diameter of large sized button one inch; of small size, half inch.  For officers of the Corps of Engineers the same button is to be used, except that in place of the eagle and stars there will be a raised E in German text.  For officers of artillery, infantry, riflemen and cavalry, the buttons will be plain gilt, convex, with a large raised letter in the centre—A for artillery, I for infantry, etc.  The exterior diameter of large seized [sic] buttons, seven-eights of an inch; small size, one half-inch.
   

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, June 26, 1861, p. 3, c. 7
25 Great Gross White Bone Pant Buttons.  At Tucker's.

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, August 24, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Officers of Companies!

1000 yards Grey Cassimere,
1000        "              Gray Clothes,

Expressly for Officers,
fine, bright colors, &c.
--Also—
The Original and Elegant North
Carolina State Arms Button,
just secured for
Officers' Uniforms!
and will be used on no others.

Send to                                  O. S. Baldwin,
                                                               
Civic and Military House,
                                                               
Wilmington, N. C.

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 19, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
Palmetto Button Factory.--A few weeks ago we mentioned that M. B. Schur had in contemplation the starting of a military button factory.  As the stock of buttons with the palmetto and State motto was entirely run out, and as thousands of uniforms are being manufactured for our brave volunteers, as well as those in regular service, such a factory fills another gap, and places us one step higher in the ladder of independence.  Mr. Schur's factory is now in full operation in Market-street, south side, midway between Meeting and King streets, where six operatives are constantly employed to supply the demand for these necessary appendages to the soldier's uniform.  This is as it should be, for Mr. Schur deserves a full measure of encouragement for his undertaking.  Some months ago, when the palmetto buttons were getting scarce and prices running up, Mr. Schur, though no mechanic and without any previous knowledge of button making, set his wits to work, and the result is, after some difficulty, it is true, the manufacture of a good substantial button, and just the article now needed.   

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, October 12, 1861, p. 2, c. 6

Military Goods!

. . . Gilt Buttons by the gross.
Pants, Vests and Dress Clothing; a complete assortment at
                                                                                                               
T. W. Royston & Co.'s.
oct 9      

SEMI-WEEKLY RALEIGH REGISTER, November 13, 1861, p. 2, c. 6
Large And
                                               
Reserved
                                                                                               
Auction Sale

of
Dry Goods.

                The Co-Partnership now existing between the undersigned will soon expire, by limitation.  This, together with the fact that nearly all of our salesmen are in the army, has determined us to close, at Public Auction, without reserve, on

Tuesday, 20th November.
(To be continued from day to day,)

                In our Store-Rooms, No. 159 Main street, Richmond, Va., the Whole of our large and valuable stock of seasonable

Staple and Fancy Dry Goods,

Consisting in part of . . .
----Bales 3-4, 3.8 and 4-4 Brown Sheetings.
----Bales Brown Drills and Osnaburgs, and Flannels.
               
Blue Suspender Buttons.
               
Metal and Military Buttons. . . .
               
Goods packed and delivered as usual.
               
Terms.—Cash (in bankable funds) on deliver.
no. 13-td                                                                                                                Watkins & Ficklin.

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 7, 1862, p. 3, c. 4

. . . J. H. Daniel & co. . . .
In the
Military Line

                They are prepared to exhibit a general assortment of . . .
               
Suspender and Fly Buttons;
               
40 gross superior Gilt Staff Buttons; . . .
 

DAILY MISSOURI REPUBLICAN, February 9, 1862, p. 1, c. 9

From Le Follet.
Paris Fashions.

. . . The bodies are made open down the front, but have usually a small piece of the same material as the skirt detached from the corsage, but which can be put under the opening for out-of-door wear.  They are fastened by buttons, unless they have some trimming down the front which necessitates a flat surface. . . For out door wear the basquine demi adjustee [sic?]  has many advocates.  The newest model of the season in this shape is made of velvet not very long, splendidly embroidered in plumettes, and buttoned a la Polonaise.  The Pardesus, trimmed with fur, is made in velvet, with large sleeves, and the fur bordering is very deep.  For aras [?] de toilette, the velvette mantle, richly embroidered and trimmed with handsome flounces of lace, is the most elegant that can be worn.  Some small paletots are being worn made of plush or velvet cloth, and fastened by large buttons.  The sleeves and collar are lined with quilled silk. 

CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE, February 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 9

Just Received.
Skirt Braids,
Black, Brown and Assorted colors.
Also, a large lot of
Gilt and Steel Buttons, Linen Shoe Laces, &c.,
At J. M. Stine's,

                                                                                    33 Lake St., corner of Wabash Avenue.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, April 10, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
The Shreveport, Texas [sic] News has a capital suggestion.  Says the News:
               
["] In answer to Beauregard's call, the bells of the Methodist, Baptist and Presbyterian churches, were taken down and shipped on the Era No. 5 to the city.  This is the way to do things; keep the ball rolling and the general will get all the brass he wants.  If he can't get enough, it will be owing to the amount of officers we have in proportion to privates; we therefore suggest, when absolutely necessary to catch the officers by their tails, and cut off the buttons.  Who seconds the motion? ["]
               
We do.  And we suggest that the "women folks" be detailed to cut off these buttons.—Would it not be funny to see these hotel militaries chased by the feminines, the latter armed with scissors.  They could get several bushels of brass buttons in Little Rock, that were never seen in camp and never glittered elsewhere than on a pavement.

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], April 18, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Military Button Factory in Atlanta.--A manufactory of the various kinds of military buttons has been established and put into operation at Atlanta, Georgia.  The establishment is supplied at present with a rolling machine, by which the sheet brass one-eighth of an inch thick, is rolled into sheets as thin as common letter paper, or even thinner.  There is one complete set of dies, with all the necessary punches, &c., for carrying the button through the different processes of manufacture.  The sheet from the rolling machine is cut into ribbon, from which what is called the "blank" is cut, the blank is then placed on the "die," over which is placed a hammer, a blow from which stamps the front of the button.  The "blank" for the back of the buttons are punched from thin sheets of tin, then stamped on a die arranged as a die for the front.
               
The hole is then punched for the reception of the wire forming the eye.  Another machine cuts and bends the wire, when it is inserted by hand and fastened.  The back is then adjusted to the front, and the two parts placed in a machine which, by being struck upon closes a small margin on the front over the back, which secures it and completes the button thus far.  A simple machine then polishes it, after which it is gilded and placed on the card.  Before reaching the polishing presses, the front of the button undergoes two process, and the back four.  About twenty gross of buttons are turned out per day.  All the machinery--which is small and delicate, was invented and made by Mr. Henry Mylius, a German watch repairer, who formerly resided in Dalton, Georgia. 

CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE, April 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 7

New Boot and Shoe Store.
142 Lake Street, Chicago.
One Price System.

                Saunders, Brother & Co., of Boston, have established a Branch Store in this city for the purpose of conducting the Boot and Shoe business upon the Cash System, and are now opening a large and well selected stock of Boots and Shoes from their own factory, and from the most eminent factories in America, made from the best material of stock, and work of the highest order.  After a practical experience of twenty-fie years in the business, we feel justified in saying that our stock of Boots and Shoes, in regard to material, style, strength, fit and adaptation to the market can not be excelled.  We ask the indulgence of the citizens of this city and interior to an examination of our stock.
               
In the Ladies', Misses and Children's line are found—
               
Satin Francais, English and French Lasting, and Heavy Serge Gaiters, Congress, Balmorals, Button Boots, Plain, Tipped and Full Trimmed Double Sole, Welted, mock Welt, and Single Sole stitched and sewed.  Glove, Pebble and Grained Calf, Kid, Goat and Morocco Balmorals and Congress, Laced Boots, and Highland Ties, Triple, Double and Single Soles, Stitched and Sewed. 

CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE, April 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 9

Great Bargains.
W. Forsyth & Co.,
18 John Street, New York.
Offer the following inducements to purchasers of
Valuable Jewelry.

. . . 2,500 Sleeve buttons                                                                     2.50 to 6.00 each 

CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE, April 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
The Trip of the Black Hawk.  The Governor's Expedition to Pittsburg Landing.
[Special Correspondence of the Chicago Tribune.] Cairo, April 13, 1862. . . . ...  Memento hunters were gathering up what they could find to take home to make their friends gape with wonder; canes marked with shot, gun flints, Bowie-knives, balls, cartridges, pelican buttons, &c, &c.  

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Augusta Auction Sale.
By W. B. Griffin.
Package Sale of
Military Goods
Direct Importation
By the Steamship Nashville.

                Tuesday, 14th of May instant, in store, commencing at 10 o'clock, will be sold, a large and valuable assortment of Military Goods, direct importation, as follows: . . .
               
        Army Buttons, according to regulation . . .
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], June 5, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale at Auction of 4731 Packages of
English Goods, direct from London, put up
expressly for this Market.
by R. A. Pringle,
At No. 137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, S. C.,
J. H. Taylor, Auctioneer.
On Wednesday Morning, June 11th,
1862, commencing at 10 o'clock.

. . . 1 case assorted Needles and Buttons 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale at Auction of
4,731 Packages
English Goods,
Direct from London, and put up expressly for this Market,
By R. A. Pringle,
Jas. H. Taylor, Auctioneer.

                On Wednesday morning, June 11, at 187 Meeting Street,  commencing at 10 o'clock. . . .
1 case assorted Needles and Buttons . . .
1 lot White and Black Bone Buttons. . .
10 great gross Agate Buttons
   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, June 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
Summary:  Letter from Capt. Galloway, Johnson's Island, May 11th, 1862, captured at Pea Ridge.  "God bless the ladies of St. Louis, I say.  We have many true friends there.  That same evening we were ordered to be ready by 4 o'clock to go to Alton, Ill., thereby depriving us of receiving from the hands of kind ladies articles we stood so much in need of.  One of the ladies who came up to see us, was Eva Bryant, whom I had the pleasure of becoming acquainted with—her whole heart and soul seemed to be set on the ultimate success of the southern cause.  I passed a few minutes very pleasantly conversing with her.  Just as she was leaving, she asked me for one of the Arkansas buttons, which was on my vest.  Of course it gave me the greatest pleasure to comply with her request—she wanted it for a necklace which she was having made, composed of one button from each of the Southern States, that was glory enough for me for one day.  I now have the consolation of knowing that a button once worn by me, and which bears upon it the coat of arms and motto of the State of Arkansas, the banner state in defence of southern rights and southern honor, now decks the necklace of a fair maiden of my own Sunny South. . . .

CHICAGO TIMES, June 18, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

The Fashions
The Style in Paris for June.

                                                                                                                From Le Follet of Paris.
. . .           Another dress, intended to be worn at a wedding, was of apple green silk, a very fashionable color.  The skirt had nine narrow flounces, very full, and placed in rows of three at equal distance.  Above each row was a small grecque, about five inches wide, in braid of a darker shade of green.  The body, high and closed, fastened by buttons of the same color as the soutache, and trimmed on each side by a grecque, diminishing in width towards the waist.  A wide sash, trimmed in the same manner, with small frills round the ends. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], June 25, 1862, p. 3, c. 4

By W. B. Griffin.
Catalogue Sale of
Imported English Goods!

Monday, 30th inst., in store, No. 274 Broad street, commencing at 10 o'clock, will be sold, . . .
500 gross Pearl Buttons; . . . 

CHICAGO TIMES, July 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Fashions for July.

                                                                                                                From Le Follet.
               
For traveling there is nothing better than plain foulards or alpacas.  In the latter material a drab shade is very much liked, and certainly is a very convenient color for tourists, who always suffer more or less from clouds of dust.  Alpaca dresses are generally made in the redingote style, and closed down the front with a row of steel buttons.  Foulards have, above the hem, a trimming formed of nine rows of braid—black, brown, China blue, or Solferino.  This trimming is also carried up the front of the skirt, and on the body, with a row of buttons of the same shade up the centre.  

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], July 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Package Sale by Catalogue of 2,000 Packages
of English Goods received per recent Arrivals,
direct from London, put up expressly for
this Market
by R. A. Pringle,
No. 137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, South Carolina,
James H. Taylor, Auctioneer.

                On Thursday Morning, July 17, 1862, commencing at 10 o'clock, will be sold,
. . . 2 cases White and Black Bone and Linen Buttons,
2 cases Japanned Metal Buttons,
3 cases White Metal Buttons,
1 case 6 and 14 line Pearl Buttons,
1 case Coat and Vest Lasting Buttons, 

CHICAGO TIMES, July 25, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

The Fashions.

Correspondence of the N. Y. Journal of Commerce.
                                                                                                                               
Paris, July 4.
. . .           French gentlemen who are bound on country excursions and country sojourns discard cloth altogether, and adopt in its stead either foulard or alpaca.  Black, grey, and violet alpaca paletots, with large metal buttons upon which are the initials, are worn.  The short pantaloon of the same material is fastened round the knee with a garter of Russian leather. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA, MS], September 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 8

By Br. Tardy & Co., Auc'rs, Mobile, Ala.
Cargo Sale of Foreign Importations, ...

. . . 50 pkgs. Porcelaine [sic] Buttons,
66 pkgs. English Pins.
200 gross Extra Pearl Buttons, 

CHICAGO TIMES, September 22, 1862, p. 4, c. 5

Paris Fashions for September.

                                                                                                                From Le Follet.
. . .
We observed a rose colored taffetas with narrow white stripes; the skirt trimmed with plisees, but on in a lozenge shape, and reaching up to the knees.  Each plisse is edged with a narrow rose and white fringe.  The body open square showing a chemisette, with a rose-colored ribbon run through the hem around the throat, and closed down the front by six pearl buttons.  The sash of ribbon to match the dress in color, trimmed with fringe, and tied in a large bow behind.  The sleeves open, with a seam at the back, are also trimmed with fringed plisses like the skirt. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [GRENADA, MS], October 15, 1862, p. 2, c. 8

M'Allister's Advertisements.
J. C. McAllister,
Jackson, Missippi, [sic]
Has just received . . .

50 gross Pearl Buttons. . . . 

CHICAGO TIMES, October 25, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Paris Fashions.
Modes for Autumn.

                                                                                                                From Le Follet.
                . . .
The Natchez, of brown woolen velvet, is not so long as the last, and divided up the back with an insertion the whole length of the mantle, made of medallions and cords of passementerie.  A kind of stole of passementerie is placed over the shoulders.  The front is trimmed with rich buttons.
                The last mantle we will mention is of black silk velvet.  It is very wide, and rather long behind like a rounded train.  It is folded from the shoulders to the waist.  Wide bands of black guipure form ornaments on the sides.  The sleeves are shaped and rather small.  Cords and tassels and buttons are used as fastenings. . .
                One of the leading Parisian houses uses but little trimming of negligees dresses; but seems to favor buttons, bows or rosettes of passementerie.  For the cold days of autumn, quilted trimmings, stitched in the same color as the material, will be fashionable.  Stitchings in white must be discarded; they have become so thoroughly common.  Bands of fancy braids or velvets will be much worn also. .
. .
                Other dresses, of jaspe (a kind of brilliant [illegible] ngled) taffetas, of silver-grey color, were trimmed with five rows of black velvet, of different [illegible] round the skirt.  Across these bands an [illegible] velvet was laid on, in the figure of 8, reaching from the top of the bottom, and at every point where it crossed the straps underneath a button of rich passementerie and jet beads were sewed. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, November 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
               
Choice New Goods, just received per steamer from Europe, on sale this day, at Bissell's, corner King and Wentworth sts.
               
Shoes!  Shoes!  Shoes!
               
300 pairs Oxonian's shoes, 250 pairs Spanish Shoes, 200 pairs Men's Bluchers, 100 pairs Lace Shoes, 100 pairs Button Gaiters, . . .
               
For sale at Bissell's, Corner King and Wentworth streets.
November 19
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 20, 1862, p. 1, c. 5-6
                                                                        From the Richmond Enquirer, Nov. 15th.

A Trip to the North--Personal Observations in Yankee Lands.

. . . .  A noble woman of Washington said to me, "go back and tell the South we love her yet, and all the mean villainy of the Lincoln Government is unable to extinguish it.  I intend to have me a brooch made of the buttons from Confederate officers, and I shall wear it in the streets of Washington." 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 25, 1862, p. 3, c. 1
               
Button Factory.—We saw some neat and strong wooden buttons, the other day, which we understood were made by Mr. A. D. Brown, at the Carter Factory of this city.  They appeared as strong as bone buttons and equally well finished.
 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], December 3, 1862, p. 3, c. 5

Ladies'
Mourning Dress Goods,
Wm. Shear,
Augusta, Georgia.

Has just received . . .
                                                               
--Also--

Superior Cavalry and Infantry Buttons, of large and small sizes; . . . 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], December 24, 1862, p. 3, c. 4

Sundries Just Received.

Greer's Almanac for 1863; Needles, Pins, Fine Combs, Coarse Combs, Brace Buttons, Flax Thread.
Dec. 24, 1862.                                                                                                        L. M. Kenney.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
A Federal Victory Exposed.—Sometime ago, the St. Louis Republican contained a report, from a Col. Rennick, of a victory he had achieved in Missouri.  Capt. Woodsmall, who whipped Rennick on the occasion, has furnished us with a statement of the affair, which shows that the federal victory was one over a widow and unarmed men.  Capt. Woodsmall's letter is worth reading, as showing of what staff abolition victories are made, and of the barbarities perpetrated in our sister State.  Col. Rennick to his accomplishment as a liar adds that of a cold blooded murderer and petty tyrant.  Read the letter:
                                                                                                                               
Little Rock, Dec. 17, 1862.
Editor True Democrat—
               
Sir:  I noticed a communication in the St. Louis Republican from the abolition Col. Bill Rennick, in which he reports an engagement between a portion of forces, commanded by himself, and my recruits, on the 14th of August, 1862.  He acknowledges that he had 280 men and one piece of artillery, and puts my force at 150 men.  Justice to myself and the men under my command impels me to give a true sketch of the affair. . . .I urged my men to keep cool and not to fire until they could see the eagles on their buttons, which order they obeyed to the letter.  . . .
                                                                                                                                               
Respectfully,
                                
                                                                                                                H. M. Woodsmall,
                                                                                                                               
Capt. Co. G, Mo. Cavalry.

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], January 31, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Cargo Sale of Imported Goods
By R. A. Pringle,
No. 137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, South Carolina,
James H. Taylor, Auctioneer
On Tuesday Morning, February 3, 1863, commencing
at 10 o'clock, will be sold,

. . . 87 great gross Bone Buttons
23 great gross 4 hole Buttons
13 great gross Agate Buttons 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], February 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale of Goods, Imported Ex British
Steamers.
By R. A. Pringle,
137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, South Carolina,
James H. Taylor, Auctioneer.

                On Thursday, 26th February, 1863, commencing at 10 o'clock—

. . . 122 great gross Bone Buttons, assorted, pants, vest and coats
260 gross Fancy Buttons 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, February 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
More Buttons.—A factory has been established at Macon, Ga., for making buttons of bone and horn. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 3, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Here is your Chance!!!  Received and for sale--copperas; chewing and smoking tobacco; crockery and glass ware; needles; pins and silk sowing thread; ribbons and trimmings; assorted colored lining silk; black vails [sic]; very rich laces; buttons; cinnamon; spice; cloves and starch; leather; shoe pegs and shoe thread; Lowells; &c. &c., by S.  Schatz, corner of Jefferson and Pine streets, mar3.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, March 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 7

$200 Reward.

                I will pay the above reward for information that will lead to the conviction and punishment of the THIEF who broke into my store last night, and stole about $2,000 worth of Goods, among which are:
               
. . . 6 dozen Military Buttons, spread eagle pattern; . . .
                                                                                                                                                       
Marks Horn.
               
Little Rock, March 17, 1863.

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], April 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

The Fashions--Spring Modes in Paris.
From Le Follet de Paris.] . . .

                For morning wear, deep linen cuffs, fastened with three buttons, either gold or precious stones, are the most fashionable.  For more dressy wear, the cuffs are made in the same shape, but of Vallenciennes lace and embroidered insertion.  With satin and velvet the sleeves are occasionally trimmed with white or black feathers, a band of the same being placed on the skirt of the dress, en tablier, and round the veste or body.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, April 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
New Disease.—The new disease, which has been attended with such fatal results among the ladies in Virginia, and known as "Button on the Brain," is raging with fearful violence in this city—Columbus Southern Republic.

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 19, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

English Calicoes! . . .
--And—
               
A lot of small GILT BUTTONS, for trimming Dresses and Bonnets, at
Averell, Rice & Co's, 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, April 23, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Opened last week, 2000 lbs. pearl starch; 7 doz. all wool scotch plaid camp shirts, with fancy buttons.  Real silver thimbles, lead pencils, &c., &c. &c.  P. Walsh.  apr23. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], April 29, 1863, p. 2, c. 5-6

The Paris Fashions
Modes for April.

From Le Follet, of Paris.] . . .

                A dress of poult de soie antique, color of Russian leather, with a very wide skirt forming a train.  Round the skirt narrow fluting [sic?] of the same material as the dress.  Plain high body, with point in front.   Sleeves with a seam at the back, opened and trimmed with hanging buttons. . .
               
Robe of poult de soie chine, color autumn leaves.  At the bottom two wide ruches, trimmed with narrow black ribbon more; the ruches are waved all round the bottom of the dress.  The body and sleeves are quite tight fitting.  The sleeves have a row of buttons up to the elbow and a ruche round the wrist. . . .
               
A straw bonnet trimmed round the front with leather buttons; curtain of white silk, also trimmed to correspond.  On the front three bows of white ribbon, with a leather button on each bow.  Three other bows fall over the curtain, and are drawn together by a band of ribbon.  Lilac chrysanthemums, mixed with green and lilac heath, ornament the outside and inside of the front. . . .
               
A bonnet of white fancy straw.  The curtain of Mexican blue silk, cut in three rounded pieces, trimmed round with fringe and hanging buttons of silk of the same color.  The outside trimmed with a bow of blue and white plaid ribbon, fringed, and the inside with coquilles of narrow tulle, placed on a wide tulle, behind which is a row of blue fringe, to match that on the curtain.  On one side a tuft of blue violets, strings of blue and white checked ribbon are placed very high up the sides and fringed at the ends.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, April 29, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
               
When an estray copy of one of the northern magazines reaches our city, it is amusing to see the eagerness of the feminines to get a sight of the fashions in it.  We would try to condense an article for their benefit, if the terms were not on inunderstandable. . . .   Deep linen cuffs, fastened with three buttons, either gold or precious stones, are fashionable. . . .  

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, April 30, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
Georgia Buttons.—We have before us a liberal sample of bone and wooden buttons, from the Macon Button Factory, which has sprung into existence and is prospering under the auspices of our enterprising fellow-townsman, Mr. C. W. Brunner.  H had no machinery, models, tools or other implements except of his own invention, to commence with, and not a man connected with the establishment has ever before been inside of a button factory.—The company have not six machines in operation, which turn out from 30,000 to 40,000 buttons per day.  The specimens on our table are strong and excellent in every respect, a slight polish being all that is necessary to make them complete.  It is through the agency of these small beginnings that we are becoming a free and independent people as well as by our arms.
               
The company are in need of bones in large quantities.  See advertisement in this issue.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 14, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
Macon Button Factory.—In referring to this enterprise some days ago, we omitted to give deserved credit to Mr. F. W. Maura, a worthy mechanic of Macon, who invented the entire machinery used in the establishment, and that without any previous knowledge on the subject.
               
In addition to the specimens of their work alluded to some days ago, we have a sample of large wooden buttons, suitable for soldiers' coats, &c., which are the best we recollect to have seen.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 20, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Just Received, . . . 150 gross assorted buttons; . . . &c.  for sale cash at Hewit & Coulson's old Stand.  J. M. Benbrook.  my20. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 23, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Something new at Nash's Music Store.--. . . pearl and agate shirt buttons; . . . 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 25, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
Staff Buttons, large and small size of superior quality, for sale by W. F. Herring & Co., Atlanta, Ga. 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER, [ATLANTA, GA], August 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 5

Auction Sales.
A splendid Assortment
by a
Late Arrival.

Will be sold AT AUCTION, at Galserville [?], on Wednesday, September [illegible], 1863, the following list of articles just received by Spanish Star Isabel 2nd: . . .
10 gross shirt buttons
1    do     pocket looking glasses
2    do     pantaloon buttons . . .
50  do   silk cotton buttons 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], October 17, 1863, p. 1, c. 7

The Fall Fashions.
Opening Day in New York—Bonnets,  Dresses,
Cloaks, Furs, Laces, Lingerie, etc.

From the New York World, Sept. 25] . . .

                Green is a very fashionable color this season, and, in silk of the shade called emeraude, with bands of ribbon, velvet of the same shade, a novel and elegant bonnet is constructed of the style called "barricade."  The bands are placed crosswise upon the body of the hat, and each square fastened with an ornamental jet button. . . .
               
The general adoption of the jacket and vest in place of the waist has made a species of habit shirt a most important item in this department.  The difference between them and the habit-shirt is that they are made with sleeves, and a deep body, so that the skirt can be fastened over them.  Collar, sleeves and front are prettily tucked, and finished with embroidery and Valenciennes edging.  The cuffs are very deep and square, the collars turned down with a point in front, and fastened with a jaunty little colored tie, of which there are many varieties.  The most recherche buttons for the cuffs, which open on the back, and for the front, which is left exposed by the vest en revers, are composed of small brilliants.  For ordinary wear, however, tiny gold buttons will answer.

Walking Boots.

                A late style of walking boots is called the Hessian.  It has a sort of cloth legging attached, which buttons up high upon the leg, and affords complete protection both from cold and wet.  The foot part is foxed with fine soft yet stout morocco, and is excellently adapted for service as well as comfort.  The sole and heel are of moderate thickness and hight [sic], quite sufficiently so for all practical purposes, and much more sensible than the three-quarter inch soles and exaggerated heels which followed the "paper" slipper and gaiter era. . . . 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Receipt for Persimmon Brandy.

Editors Charleston Courier:--. . . But another important item is, to save the seeds of the persimmons after they have boiled, and you let out the slop, for they are excellent for coffee, rather stronger or rougher than the genuine Rio; hence, I mix two parts of dried sweet potatoes to one of persimmon seed.  Dr. Buck says this coffee is equal to Java coffee!  By the boiling the seeds are rid of all mucilaginous substances, and just right for coffee or buttons.  If you use them for buttons, the washer woman will hardly break them with her battling stick.  For coffee they should be parched twice as long as any other substitute, so as to make them tender to the centre.
                                                                                                                               
Alabama. 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER, [ATLANTA, GA], November 8, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Recipe for Persimmon Brandy.

Editors Charleston Courier: . . .But another important item is, to save the seeds of the persimmons after they have boiled, and you let out the slop, for they are excellent for coffee, rather stronger or rougher than the genuine Rio; hence I mix two parts of dried sweet potatoes to one of persimmon seed.  Dr. Buck says this coffee is equal to Java coffee.  By the boiling the seeds are rid of all mucilaginous substances, and are just right for coffee or button.  If you use them for buttons the washer woman will hardly break them with her battling stick.  For coffee they should be parched twice as long as any other substitute; so as to make them tender to the center.
                                                                                                                               
Alabama. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, November 21, 1863, p. 1, c. 6

Fashions for Winter.
[From the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine for October.]

                Winter fashions are being created and decided upon in the recesses of fashionable dressmakers' and milliners' repositories, but the autumn fashions are best to be admired on the shore at Biarritz or Trouville.
               
Two things strike one as particularly novel in ladies' costumes at Trouville; first, the very pretty chamois colored leather boots, coming half-way up the leg, and either buttoned or laced at the side, the tops being ornamented with a silk cord and two small tassels; and, secondly, the cannes, or, in plain English, walking sticks, sported by the most elegant among the votaries of fashion.
 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER, [ATLANTA, GA], November 22, 1863, p. 3, c. 1
Just received from Wilmington, N. C.--The following goods bought there at prices far below goods at last auction, and which will be sold accordingly: . . .
100 great gross Agate Buttons
300 great gross Pant Buttons . . .
Together with a large stock of other goods to which we invite the attention of our friends and customers.
                                                                                                               
A. Gunst & Bro.
                                                                                                                               
Whitehall street. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], November 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

Brown, Fleming & Co.
Wm. H. Barnes,
Auctioneer,

Will sell at their WARE ROOMS, Masonic Hall, Atlanta, Ga., on

Thursday, December 3d,

Commencing at 10 o'clock, a large and fresh assortment of

Desirable Imported and Domestic
Goods,

. . .           Agate (pants and coat) Buttons, 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
The Latest "Fashions."--Our ladies will, doubtless, be glad to learn something of the styles of dress in vogue this winter in the Northern cities.  Our items of information are few, but entirely reliable, as we derive them from one who has "been there." . . . .  Small, plain white linen collars and cuffs are worn outside the tight fitting sleeve, with sleeve buttons, are universal.  Walking dresses, with two little flaps dropping from the waist over the skirt behind, like pigeon tails, are worn by all.   But most sensible of all is the ladies' gaiter, which is heavy, with thick sole.  Gaiters the color of the walking dresses were coming rapidly into fashion.  The great "rage" is crimson, which ornaments every article of costume and is seen everywhere.  Buttons the color of the dress worn are used in great profusion. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], February 5, 1864, p. 2, c. 7

More Blockade Goods!

. . . 36 gross small Gilt and Silvered Buttons,
2 gross Confederate Staff Buttons,
10 gross Agate Buttons, assorted...
                                                                                                         
P. P. Pease, Peachtree street.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, March 3, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
Buttons.—We have been shown some very good horn buttons, manufactured at Mr. John Cammack's, by one of his sons.  They are greatly needed now, and we hope he will continue to make them.

CHARLESTON MERCURY, March 12, 1864, p. 1, c. 3
               
News for the Ladies.--A glance over a late fashion plate, which comes through the blockade, will inform our lady friends of the styles now in vogue across the water: . . .
               
The prevailing taste in dress silks seems to be for small figures on solid grounds.  Apple green, chocolate brown and Marie Louise blue are the favorite colors.  The lower edge of the skirt is always trimmed, sometimes with a puff, edged with a quilling of worsted braid; oftener an elaborate pattern worked in velvet, ribbon, and medallions of velvet and lace.  The bodies are detached from the skirts, and have double points both back and front.  Girdles are worn with plain waists; they are made of moire, corded with Russia leather, and trimmed with leather buttons.  Open sleeves are always worn in full dress.  Garibaldi waists are now made with yokes.
               
For mourning costume, linen sets, narrow collars and broad cuffs, stitched with colored thread, are worn.  Sleeve buttons are indispensable, jet and gold being the favorite style.  Nets and fancy aprons are worn.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], March 26, 1864, p. 2, c. 5

More
Blockade Goods!
A Fine Assortment of
Blockade Goods

                Just arrived and for sale--as follows:

. . . Black Horn Buttons, . . .
Silvered and Gilt Buttons . . .
The whole to be disposed of at wholesale only by P. P. Pease, Peachtree street. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], April 27, 1864, p. 1, c. 5

The Spring Fashions
Opening Day in New York.
From the New York Herald, March 25]

. . . Dresses are worn high to the throat and buttoned in front, except for ball or evening costume, when low-necked dresses are the style.  

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, April 27, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
               
The latest Paris fashion in ladies' dress is, for out of doors, a garment cut very like a man's great coat, fitting close, and covered with brass buttons—buttons not only for use but for ornament, some of them even being stuck on the shoulders.  Several ladies are to be met in the street with this strange vestment, but the multiplicity of buttons, which glare finely, produces an effect more strange than agreeable. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], May 11, 1864, p. 2, c. 8

Confederate Tailoress.
Mrs. H. Earles

Takes this method of informing the community that she has taken rooms over Mr. Lynch's store, on Whitehall street, where she would be pleased to have a liberal share of patronage.  She has on hand some very elegant goods in the way of . . .
Staff Buttons,. . . 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 11, 1864, p. 2, c. 1-2  [either some of the word here are actually French, which is quite likely, or the English translator wasn't very good, or the typesetter was inadequate.]

Fashions for May.
Interesting to Our Lady Readers.
[From Le Follet.]

                The basquine of black velvet is very charming and Spanish like, when trimmed with gold or silver hanging buttons.  These should be placed up all the seams of the back, front and sleeves, and along the bottom of the veste.  Silver buttons are generally preferred to gold.  For children this style of basquine is also much used.  Ribbons of rare beauty are made for sashes.  Plaid and with stamped velvet ribbons are much liked.  There is a small passementerie, very pretty, used for edging the wide sashes when made in the same material as the dress. . . .
               
Large buttons are now worn down the waistcoats, which are made of colored cloth or silk, the same shade as the skirt.  The veritable gilet pierrot should be composed of white voulard of very fine quilting; the large flat buttons matching the color of the skirt.  If the waistcoat is velvet, large steel buttons may be used. . . .
               
A robe of corded toile de soie, dove colored.--Round the bottom of the skirt a light fancy fringe formed of green silk; above this, an embroidery of stars in he same color.  The sleeves, long and open at the wrist, are trimmed to match; and all down the front of the body and skirts are cut mother of pearl buttons, each surrounded with passementerie resembling the fringe. . . .
               
A black moire dress; the skirt set on in the new fashion--that is to say with one wide plait in the middle of the front.  This plait is made entirely of lightish blue taffetas.  A broad black lace in deep points is placed at each edge of the blue taffetas, and, meeting down the middle, is joined at each point under a large silver button.  A button also is placed on each blue space between the points.  The corselets is blue, covered with black lace; but instead of a body, it has a blue veste trimmed with black Astracan. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], May 13, 1864, p. 1, c. 6-7

Fashions for May—Interesting to our Lady Readers.

From Le Follet.] . . .
               
The basquine of black velvet is very charming and Spanish-like, when trimmed with gold or silver hanging buttons.  These should be placed up all the seams of the back, front, and sleeves, and along the bottom of the veste.  Silver buttons are generally preferred to gold.  For children this style of basquine is also much used.  Ribbons of rare beauty are made for sashes.  Plaid and with stamped velvet ribbons are much liked.  There is a small passementerie, very pretty, used for edging the wide sashes when made in the same material as the dress. . . .
               
Large buttons are now worn down the waistcoats, which are made of colored cloth or silk, the same shade as the skirt.  The veritable gilet pierrot should be composed of white foulard or very fine quilting:  the large flat buttons matching the color of the skirt.  If the waistcoat is velvet, large steel buttons may be used. . . .
               
A robe of corded toile de soie, dove colored.  Round the bottom of the skirt a light fancy fringe formed of green silk; above this, an embroidery of stars in the same color.  The sleeves, long and open at the wrist, are trimmed to match; and all down the front of the body and skirts are cut mother of pearl buttons, each surrounded with passementerie resembling the fringe. . . .
               
A black moire dress; the skirt set on in the new fashion—that is to say, with one wide plait in the middle of the front.  This plait is made entirely of lightish blue taffetas.  A broad black lace in deep points is placed at each edge of the blue taffetas, and, meeting down the middle, is joined at each point under a large silver button.  A button also is placed on each blue space between the points.  The corselet is blue, covered with black lace; but instead of a body, it has a blue vest trimmed with black Astracan. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 6, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
Little steps towards Southern independence.--The following list of manufactories of general utility, not heretofore made in the South, is copied from exchanges within the past few days, says the Charlotte Bulletin.  It shows that our people are really making some progress towards the independence that we have heard talked of so much.  We have not included the cotton and woollen mills dotted here and there in all the States, or the iron establishments, or the Government works for making arms, powder, etc.
               
We have not doubt there are many other establishments of which we have seen no notice, that are adding to the resources of the country, by making articles that we have heretofore depended upon the Yankees to furnish us: . . .
               
Button Manufactory at Columbus, Ga. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, June 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 2

Letter from Montgomery.

. . . We have this morning exhibited a portion of the machinery being prepared here for the manufacture of buttons, a manufactory of which is to be immediately started in this city.  This, though comparatively a small affair, is yet of much importance to the people generally, who have been paying from 75 cents to $1 for a dozen of very common bone buttons.  We congratulate the community on the prospect of soon having home made buttons at less price and of better quality.  We wish abundant success to those who have embarked in the enterprise, and hope soon to see other manufacturers of needful articles springing up amongst us. . . . 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 29, 1864, p. 1, c. 3

The Fall Fashions.

                For the delectation of our lady readers, we clip the following from the New York Herald of the 21st inst.: . . .
               
A novelty in kid gloves is to wear them with five or six small buttons, and coming therefore very high up the wrist.  The high wrist of the undersleeve then comes over the glove. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 4, 1864, p. 1, c. 3
               
The Saratoga belles this summer, delight in contrasts in dress.  Yellow or red trimming on black is popular.  Military high necks, with buttons all over, and shoulder straps, for the morning; and very low dairy windows, with short sleeves and long skirts, in the evening.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, October 13, 1864, p. 3, c. 2
Fancy Articles.  Consisting of Knitting Needles, Pins, Thread, Buttons.  Also, Fine English Stationery, Pencils, Pins, &c.  For sale at the Book Store.  Albany, Sept. 15th, 1864. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 20, 1864, p. 1, c. 6

The Prevailing Fashions

                A London correspondent writes as follows: . . . .  Gloves are worn with two buttons.   

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, October 28, 1864, p. 2, c. 4

The Fall Fashions.

                For the delectation of our lady readers, we clip the following from the New York Herald of the 21st inst.: . . .
               
A novelty in kid gloves is to wear them with five or six small buttons, and coming therefore very high up the wrist.  The high wrist of the undersleeve then comes over the glove.
 

DALLAS HERALD, November 26, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
               
We were shown, a few days since, a lot of Horn Buttons, made in this place by Mr. L. Louis, which, though rough, are a great desideratum in these scarce times.  Mr. Louis has put up a lathe which turns out buttons as fast as may be needed.  See his notice in to-day's paper. 

DALLAS HERALD, November 26, 1864, p. p. 2, c. 5
               
Coat Buttons.—The undersigned is now prepared with machinery to manufacture Horn Buttons in any quantity and of any size, at his shop near the Ferry, in Dallas.
                                                                                                                                    
L. Louis.
Nov. 26, 1864. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, December 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 1

Foreign Fashions.

                As a matter of curiosity, and to please the ladies--God bless them--we publish the latest agony on the subject of dress: . . .
               
Buttons arranged in patterns have a very pretty effect.  They must be covered with some contrasting color.  Bands of black silk, dotted with white chenille, and bands of black silk with a heading of small silk cord, are very striking and pretty trimmings. . . .
               
Although the large ball buttons are still popular, the latest style is square, and quite expensive.  Elegant scarfs [sic] and neck ties are to be had, made of wide plaid and plain ribbons with fringed ends.  Narrow ribbons are also soon tied in a bow at the back of the neck, the ends falling below the waist.  Fancy combs and fancy jewelry are very much worn, but for demi-toilette, combs with large ball are preferred.  Beautiful little fancy boots, with tassels, for ladies will be extremely popular during the winter.
   

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, February 1, 1865, p. 1, c. 6
                                                                               
Duff's Regiment, 33d Texas Cavalry,
                                                                                               
Camp Gano, C. N., Jan. 15th, 1865.
               
Ed. News:--Citizens and non-combatants say that "what a soldier don't know is not worth learning," but really I don't know what to write.  I arrived here from home on the 6th inst. and found "the boys" generally well—the health of the regiment was never better, only one case in the hospital—all is life and animation; everybody comfortable as soldiers expect to be.  The winter has been unusually mile for this climate, but rain enough to keep up a good supply of mud, which makes it disagreeable.  I find on my return quite a change in many of the citizens round about.  They have become so sociable that parties are being quite common—"very select," of course—only officers are expected, and "eagle buttons" rule, but some of them do not prove very profitable.   . . . 
               
Yours, etc.,                                                                                            Lance Corporal

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], February 15, 1865, p. 3, c. 4
The latest wrinkle is the introduction of square buttons.  With these the ladies most plentifully trim their dresses.  They (not the ladies, but the buttons,) are of all sizes, up to an inch square.  The *haut ton* is the big button, about the size of a square on a checker board. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, March 22, 1865, p. 2, c. 5

Spring Goods!
Varied Assortment!

Consisting of the following-- . . . military buttons, . . . Just received and for sale by Sampson & Hendricks, Congress Avenue, Austin, March 21, 1865. 

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, April 14, 1865, p. 2, c. 6

New Goods.

I have just received a large lot of Spring & Summer Calicoes, French and American.  A few patterns of Black Calico, Also Muslins, Irish and Brown Linen, Domestics, bleached and unbleached.
               
Coffee, Soda, Blacking, blacking brushes, Agate Buttons, white and colored Pearl Buttons, Tooth Brushes, Lily White, &c., &c.
               
I also have a large assortment of

Ladies' Shoes,

                Cotton Cards, and one Fine Cloth Coat (large size).
               
For sale low for Confederate money and cheap for specie.  Interest notes, La. money, coupons of 6 per cent bonds and old issue taken at current rates.
                                                                                                                                               
E. Blood.
               
April 14, 1865. 

FORT SMITH NEW ERA, May 6, 1865, p. 1, c. 5

The Rebels at Church in Richmond after the Capture.

                                                                                                                Richmond, Monday, April 10, A.M.
               
The Episcopal Church where Jeff Davis was accustomed to attend was very well attended yesterday, but most of the audience were ladies, nine-tenths of whom were dressed in deep mourning.
               
One had two rows of Confederate buttons upon a black silk dress, and another wore upon her sleeves the gold braid, indicating the rank of Colonel.  About a dozen rebel officers attended in full uniform, and two or three minus one arm or leg were wearing "Confederate Grey". . . .

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], May 31, 1865, p. 1, c. 1

Athens a Military Post.

Attention is directed to the circulars of Capt. A. B. Cree, in this paper, who assumes command of this Post as Provost Marshall . . . [circular prohibits officers wearing CS uniforms--if can't get citizens' clothes, must "take from the grey cloth all military buttons, trimmings, or insignia of rank."]