Cotton and Wool Cards and Carding:
Articles from Civil War Newspapers

[FAYETTEVILLE, ARK.] THE ARKANSIAN, January 6, 1860, p. 4, c. 6

Steam
Wool-Carding Machine;
Fayetteville—Arkansas.

                We cheerfully announce to the people of North-west Arkansas and South-west Missouri, that we are better prepared than ever, to accommodate them with carding.  Having attached another sett of Cards, and

A Steam Engine!

for propelling the entire machinery, we feel satisfied that no other Mill in the country can turn out work wit so little delay; thereby obviating weeks or months of anxious [illegible].

The Machinery is all New;

in good condition, and is attended exclusively by us.  From our long experience in business, we feel assured that we can render ample satisfaction to all who patronize us.
Terms:  Six and a fourth cents per pound cash, or the fifth pound of wool.     
May 14, 1859.                                                                                        A. & J. D. Crouch. 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 10, 1860, p. 3, c. 8

Notice!
I desire to call the attention of
Southern Cotton and  Woolen
Manufacturers!
To my establishment in Baltimore, Maryland, for the Manufacturing of
Cotton and Wool Cards,
being the only establishment South of Mason & Dixon's Line.
I also manufacture "Leather Bands" with Patent Machinery of my own invention.
Also, Leather Hose, of superior quality, all made of the best oak tanned leather, and warranted equal to any made north.
On hand a general assortment of articles used by Manufacturers, Machine Shops, Railroad Locomotive Builders, &c, &c.

                                                                                              John H. Haskell,
                                                                                             
33 South Eutaw Street, Baltimore, Md.
April 3, 1860 
     

LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, July 7, 1860, p. 1, c. 4

Manufacturers' Articles.
J. & C. Reakirt,
52 Second Street, Cincinnati, O.

Keeps a Full Supply of
Manufacturers' Articles,
Carding Machines,
Warp on Beam, assorted colors,
Machine Cards,
Wire Heddles and Frames,
Shuttles,
Steel Reeds and Pickers,
Lacing and Picker Leather,
Hand Cards, Tenter Hooks,
Comb Plate, &c., &c.
Also a full assortment of
Dye-Stuffs,                Cochineal,
Cudbear,                Indigo,
Madder, Cutch,
Log Wood,                Sumac,  
Cam Wood, &c., &c.
October 1, 1859                                     13—1y.  

LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, July 25, 1861, p. 2, c, 3

An Appeal to the Women of Arkansas.

                It has been wisely suggested by a contemporary that the patriotic women of the country should knit socks for the volunteers.           
                In addition to this we beg leave to call the attention of the true hearted women of the country to some other points. . . .
                We beg our brethren of the press to call the attention of their readers to this.  Let us go back to the good old times when the hard and horny hand was the only badge or sign of true nobility; when we wore clothes of our own manufacture and were a happier people.  Set your carding machines, the spinning wheels and looms at work.  No matter if the piano is closed and dancing lessons neglected.  There is brave music in the hum of the spinning wheel and the clicking of the loom.  And the exercise in performing these labors brings roses to the cheeks and light to the eyes of our maidens. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, September 26, 1861, p. 2, c. 3       
                The following is from the Van Buren Press:    
                "We understand that there is a large quantity of wool in the country, and the cotton spinning factory, in this city, is now engaged to its fullest capacity, in turning out a superior article of cotton yarn.  In view of these facts then, there need be no want of good material for clothing, if the people will only set about manufacturing it.  Let it be done.  'It were well done, it were done quickly.'"              
                What is the capacity of the factory, Mr. Dunham?  Can it be altered so as to card wool?  Are there any looms connected with it?  There is, if we mistake not, another cotton factory in the north west.  The Press, being near that point, we are sure would confer a favor on its readers by informing them what the other factory is doing.  The development of our resources is an important object just now, and we are anxious to show our sister states that Arkansas is not as far behind them and they may have been led to suppose.  A word in our ear Mr. Dunham?  The quotation in your paragraph above is not from Shakspeare [sic].  If Kennard, of the Batesville Balance, sees it, he will illustrate the action that takes place when a duck sees a June bug.           

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, October 17, 1861, p. 2, c. 3 
                The following is an extract received from a friend in Montgomery county. 
*              *                *                "Here among the hills, in the far western portion of the State, our women are emulating the spirit of their mothers in the revolutionary war.  Seeing the many calls in your paper for clothing for our volunteers, the ladies went to work carding, spinning, weaving and knitting, and about the middle of September, sent a lot of clothing, socks, etc., to the Montgomery Hunters, commanded by Capt. Simpson and attached to Col. McNair's regiment.  This lot of clothing was principally of home manufacture, and valued here at from eight hundred to a thousand dollars.  Another lot is now ready to be forwarded.                            
                                                 E. W. Amerson."            
                Well done for Montgomery.  If other counties would do as well in proportion to population and wealth, the clothes furnished would exceed a million of dollars in value. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, October 17, 1861, p. 2. c. 4 
                Van Buren Steam Cotton Mill.—The Van Buren Press gives us the following information, for which we take off our hat to Mr. Durham and make him a low bow:     
                "In answer to the queries of the Little Rock True Democrat, with the assistance of Mr. Morris we can give the desired information.  The Van Buren Mill is now in full operation, and is composed as follows: 
                Two sets of wool cards—which can card 300 lbs. . . .                   
                They run an engine of 160 horse power.  From which power a saw mill is run, when they have nothing else to do. . . .                               
                Planters having cotton to spin and wool to card, will find this Mill just the place to have it worked up in the best manner. . . .           

[LITTLE ROCK] DAILY STATE JOURNAL, December 12, 1861, p. 2, c. 4

Wool Carding Machine,
For Sale!

                We have in store a Wool Carding Machine, which might be made very useful to this part of the country.  It will either be sold, or other arrangement might be made with some responsible party to put it into service.                 
                                                Burgevin & Field. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 26, 1861, p. 1, c. 4       
                C. E. Tobey, of Norristown, Pope county, Ark., writes to a friend in this city, that he is putting up a spinning factory, and by the first of March will have 288 spindles running.  Success to him.  The Van Buren factory has 1,808 spindles running, and can turn out 500 pounds of cotton yarn a day.  It has, also, two sets of wool cards in operation.  The cotton mill in Washington county, we are told, is idle at present.  There is a large factory in Pike county, but we are not advised what it is doing now.

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, January 2, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

Manufactures in Arkansas.

                There is a tobacco factory at Bentonville in Benton county which is said to be a paying institution.  The tobacco crop is getting to be an important one in the northwest.  There is a large cotton factory in Washington county.  The cotton factory at Van Buren is a large affair and in addition to spindles, has cards for wool.  Mr. Tobey, of Norristown, Pope county, has, or will soon have, his cotton factory in operation.  There is, also, a cotton factory in Pike county. . .

 [LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, January 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 4 
                The Gold Medals.—Sometime last summer, Gen. Wm. E. Ashley, of this city, and President of the State Agricultural Society, offered a gold medal as a premium to the lady who would weave the greatest number of yards of woolen cloth up to a certain time. . . .            
                The following is the letter:--                  
                                                                                                                Ouachita County, Ark.        
                Gen. Ashley:--My daughter, Nancy R. Anderson, a girl of nineteen years, commenced on the 17th  of September, to compete for the medal you offered for the greatest number of yards of woolen cloth.  She wove eighty-one yards of jeans, and twenty-four yards of checked linsey.  She carded and spun a part of the filling after she had commenced the weaving.  I have doubts about her getting the medal, yet she desires me to write to you and ascertain who wove the greatest number of yards and won the prize.                      
                                                                                                                Respectfully yours,                            
                                                                                                                E. B. Anderson. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, January 16, 1862, p. 3, c. 2 
                A great complaint is made of the scarcity of cotton cards.  The usual price was sixty cents and now two dollars is offered.  They are easily made, if the wire can be procured.  The enterprising man who can set up a manufactory of wire in the South would be a public benefactor. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, February 4, 1862, p. 2, c. 6
               
A gentleman in Dawson, Terrell county, has succeeded in making cotton cards, and is now engaged in manufacturing them.  Good for the blockade!—Macon Telegraph.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, February 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 1 
                The Macon Telegraph says a gentleman in Dawson, Terrell county, has succeeded in making cotton cards, and is now engaged in manufacturing them.  He is a public benefactor. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, February 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Record of Industry.

                Miss Nancy R. Anderson, Ouachita county, aged 19, from 17th Sept. to January, wove 81 yards of jeans and 24 yards of checked linsey.  She carded and spun a part of the filling. . . .              

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, March 29, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Wool Carding Notice.

                The undersigned takes this method to inform his customers, that he will commence carding their wool the 1st day of May.      
                To prepare wool for carding, wash it well and pick the burrs out; have it thoroughly dry.

Terms for Carding.

                15 cts. per lb, if I find oil; 12 ½ cts. when the customer finds oil.  Beef's foot, hog's foot, or lard oil, preferable.  Common lard will do in warm weather.  ¼ of the wool where the customer finds oil; 2 ½ cts. for each lb. of wool, will be added, if I find oil when I am required to toll the wool.  About 1 pit of oil or lard is sufficient for 10 or 12 lb. of wool.  
                Do not wait until Fall to bring in your Spring wool.                         
                H. Ware.    
March 29, 1862    

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 8
               
Economy.—We were shown a few days since a sample of thread spun from cotton carded on a woollen factory at Mr. J. Summerour's, Amicolala.  It proves beyond question that cotton can be manufactured into rolls on wool cards so as to answer all the purposes of domestic use.  The rolls are sold at the mill at 20 cents per lb; and if cotton be bought below at 7 and 8 cents they would cost much less.  During the blockade we can get neither cards nor goods from abroad, nor thread from home only at a ruinous price, therefore every prudent house keeper will at once arrange to make their own cloth.  This is true independence, the results of which will shortly make us a great self-sustaining nation, and a wise, good and happy people. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 15, 1862, p. 1, c. 8
               
We are gratified that Mr. J. M. Keep, of this city, has in process of construction a machine for the manufacture of woolen and cotton cards.  He has shown a specimen of his handiwork, and we have no hesitancy in pronouncing him fully capable of his undertaking.  The specimen shown us was made by the model of his machine, which is to be moulded out of iron.—Selma Reporter. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 15, 1862, p. 3, c. 1
               
Cotton Cards.—We have inadvertently neglected to call attention, editorially, to the important fact that Messrs. J. Ennis & Co., of this city, have in store a large lot of Cotton  Cards.  It is an important fact, for such cards have for months been in much demand, and it was almost impossible to procure them at any price.  It has been stated that they cannot be manufactured in the South, for the want of the right kind of wire.  The ingenuity and enterprise of our people will supply all such wants in time; but it is essential that they should have cotton cards now, when the raw material is uncommonly cheap and every process of its manufacture extravagantly high.  The cotton card, the spinning wheel and the hand loom, though they look very much like a return to primitive and "old fogy" customs, will act an essential part in working out our people's independence and prosperity.
 

CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE, April 17, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Letters from Secessia.  Pictures and Writings of Rebel Life. 
From the Camps of Island No. 10.

                Our own correspondent with the expedition on the Mississippi, sends us a budget of letters from the captured rebel camps of Island No. 10.  They constitute graphic pictures of phases of Southern life under the rebellion, and we give them verbatim and liberatim without comment:
                ... From another letter, dated Saline, La., Feb. 22, 1862, and signed Hassa Mobley:  "I do hope by the blessing of God that peace will be made shortly, and all the soldiers return back to their beloved homes; and the only way is to put all of our trust in God, and be prayerful.  Are there any cotton cards in Columbus?  I heard there was some there.  There is a great call for cards here.  Most all of the women and girls have gone to spinning and weaving.  You just ought to be here to see how industrious we all are.  It is the hardest times I ever saw about getting anything."
                ... One W. B. Terral of Union Parish, Louisiana, writing to his brother, says: "Ian' my Fammerley are all well we have got plenty of meat and bread but we are nearly destitute of clothing and no cards to spin any with Jim I want to know if there is any cotton cards whare you are if there is you and tom miles must send a box of them here so we can card and spin several of you fling in and send back a box Jim I want you to come back when your time is out if you vollenteer in three weaks after you get herer for I want to see you and the girls wants to see you and Martha and the children wants to see you so we all wants to see you Jim I recon you think hard of me for not writing to you oftener but this is the last paper I have got in the world nor cant get no more for it is not here and I have got no money neither to send a letter with nor cant get it at all for it is not here."   

THE SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], April 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Domestic Manufactures.

We are pleased to record the fact, that Mr. R. Schevenell has succeeded in making machinery for the manufacture of cotton cards--an article so much needed throughout the Southern Confederacy at this time. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 8
               
Cotton Cards Made in Athens.—We have seen a pair of  Cotton Cards manufactured by Mr. R. S. Schevenell, of this place, and a specimen of the rolls made by them.  So far as we are a judge, they do as good work as any of Northern make.  Mr. S. has invented a machine for drawing the wire and pricing the leather.  The wires are placed by hand, which renders the operation more expensive than if done by machinery.  Mr. Schevenell will soon be able to turn them out very fast.—Athens Banner.
   

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 14, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
                . . . This suggests the importance of putting into requisition every means within our reach for domestic manufacture of all articles of necessity.  No time should be lost.  Cotton and wool should be speedily distributed to all parts of the State, and all the cards and hand looms that can be had, should be kept constantly employed.  Looms and spinning wheels can be manufactured at home, but the cards can only be had from abroad, but they must be had no matter what the price.  Let our merchants bear this in mind, for it is impossible to overstock our market with cards under the present obstacles to our trade. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 4, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Scarcity of Cotton Cards.--We are reliably informed that the article of Cotton Cards, so valuable to the South at this time in the manufacture of clothing, has become a prohibited article of export from the Northern ports, the officials of the Lincoln Government having, on several occasions lately, refused to clear vessels with these goods on board for ports in the West Indies or Bahamas until such articles were taken ashore again.
   

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], June 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 4
               
Cotton Cards.--The article of Cotton Cards, so useful to the South, has, we are informed, been stopped in its exportation from Northern ports, the officers of the Yankee Government refusing to clear any vessels with these goods on board, and have, in several instances, required ship-masters to take out a considerable part of their cargo in order to get these articles out before a clearance would be given.--Charleston Courier.
   

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], June 8, 1862, p. 2, c. 3-4

Editorial Correspondence.

                                                                                                   Gayoso House, Memphis, May 31.
               
I left Mobile at 4 o'clock, P.M., on the 29th, by the Mobile & Ohio R. R., which runs northwardly nearly parallel with the Tombigbee river, through a poor piney woods country. . . .  Rigid military orders have closed all the drinking saloons and bars in hotels or elsewhere, on the way.  A toddy cannot be had in any of the towns through which I have passed, for love or money.  Juleps, smashes, cobblers, and all the delightful and exhilarating beverages are as scarce as _old Java Coffee_, and as difficult to find as a pair of cotton cards in a country store. . .
   

WASHINGTON [AR] TELEGRAPH, June 11, 1862
CARDS.--Citizens wishing to supply themselves with cotton and woollen cards may leave a sum of money at our law office for that purpose.  When a sufficient amount is made up they will be obtained across the Rio Grande.
   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, June 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 1     
                By the following from the Washington Telegraph, it will be seen that an avenue is opened for obtaining cotton cards—an article much needed at this time.  We don't see why a full supply cannot be obtained by uniting with our enterprising fellow-citizens of Hempstead:          
                Cards.—Citizens wishing to supply themselves with cotton and woolen cards may leave a sum of money at our law office for that purpose.  When a sufficient amount is made up they will be obtained across the Rio Grande.  

CHARLESTON MERCURY, July 14, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
               
To the Editor of the Charleston Mercury:  Permit me a little space in your journal to make some acknowledgments for donations, for the benefit of our soldiers, and more especially for the sick in our hospitals.
               
Miss Cobia, of Charleston, sent two sacks of wool, cotton cards, and other articles.  Three dozen pairs of cotton cards were sent by several ladies of Charleston, Columbia and Newberry, and a half a dozen pair by Graveley & Pringle.  These I have distributed according to the expressed wishes of the donors--in every case to those only who were manufacturing clothing for their sons, husbands, or brothers in the army.  The six pair of cotton cards for the lady in Spartanburg District who, by her own industry, clothed her four sons in the army of Virginia, I carried to her family on the day when the mournful tidings arrived that one of these heroic boys had fallen in battle and in the arms of victory. . . .Jno.  Bachman.
   

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, TA], June 16, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
Cotton Cards.  120 pair cotton cards for sale by Jacob Kauffer, Auction and General Commission Merchant.                                                                                                                  je10.
   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, July 3, 1862, p. 1, c. 7

Wool Carding and Loom Making.

                The undersigned is prepared to Card Wool at his place on the Arkansas river, thirty miles below Pine Bluff. 
                Persons sending Wool are required to have it thoroughly washed.
                All burs and hard substances must be carefully picked out.           
                Wool should not be greased at home, as it makes it gum, hard to card, and naps it.          
                One pound of Lard or Oil should be sent with every eight pounds of Wool to be carded.  
                Terms of Carding—One fourth of the Wool.    
                I am also manufacturing Looms with "Flying Shuttles," on which a good hand can weave Forty      Yards of plain cloth per day.  They are substantially and neatly made of Seasoned Ash, are well ironed and will last a life time.  Price—Fifty Dollars. 
                I desire to purchase several "Spinning Jenneys," and will pay a high price for them.  Persons having old ones, or any parts thereof, not in use, will aid the cause by writing us, as from several old ones, sufficient material might be procured to make an effective one.  Address                
                                                                                                                Edw. C. Morton,                
                                                                                                Cummins P. O., Arkansas county, Ark. 

[LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, July 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 1 
                Carding Machine and Loom Factory.—In our last issue we omitted to call attention to the advertisement of Capt.  E. C. Morton, who cards wool, and manufactures looms, at his plantation in Arkansas county.  As Capt. M. devotes the entire profits of this branch of his labors to the benefit of the families of absent volunteers, his facilities for doing good will be increased, and the country served to that much greater extent, by keeping him constantly engaged in filling orders. 

[LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, July 12, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Wool Carding and Loom Making.

                The undersigned is prepared to card Wool at his place on the Arkansas River, thirty miles below Pine Bluff. 
                Persons sending Wool are requested to have it thoroughly washed.
                All Burs and hard substances must be carefully picked out.           
                Wool should not be greased at home, as it makes it gum, hard to card, and naps it.          
                One pound of Lard or Oil should be sent with every eight pounds of wool to be carded.  
                Terms of Carding.—One-fourth of the wool.     
                I am also manufacturing Looms, with "Flying Shuttle," on which a good hand can weave forty yards of plain cloth per day.  They are substantially and neatly made of seasoned Ash, are well ironed and will last a life-time.       
                Price—Fifty Dollars.        
                I desire to purchase several "Spinning Jennys," and will pay a high price for them.  Persons having old ones, or any parts thereof, not in use, will aid the cause, by writing me, as from several old ones, sufficient material might be procured to make an effective one.  
                Address,                                                                               Edw'd C. Morton,                
                 Cummins P. O., Arkansas county, Arks.
July 5, 1862. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], August 6, 1862, p. 4, c. 7

Work for All.

I have purchased 1,000 dollars worth of cotton cards, which I am willing to sell to any person for a good note for ten dollars--the note must have the name of some person known to myself.  Then I will agree to take cloth in payment for the note, at market prices, delivered between this and July 1st, 1862.  Persons who wish to lend a helping hand in working out our independence, and at the same time make for themselves a living, must make arrangements to get a pair of cards, as they are the bane of our independence.  The Factory's may be burnt, but cotton cards in the hands of the working women are safe.
April 23.   

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, August 15, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

Capital of ye Mississippi,

                                                                                                8th month, 1862, A.D.
Mons. Editor:  In giving up a portion of my time to your valuable "Courier," do not think my theme shall be entirely war. ... Jackson is crowded day and night ... Cotton cards *only* $12 a pair--very low, indeed; because they commanded the high price of $50, for three months after Fort Sumter was ours... Asa Klubs.   

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, September 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 2       
                Home Manufactures.—A lady friend who resides in Panola, informed us a few days ago, that the ladies of that county are actively engaged in making cloth for those at home and in the army. . . Everywhere throughout our State, the cards, old fashioned wheel, and loom are making similar music to that which cheered our grand fathers fifty years ago.  The ladies are not only making clothes, but they are manufacturing their own bonnets, shoes, and almost every other article they were accustomed to buy from the Yankees.  The country is sadly in want of cotton cards.  If a sufficient quantity of them could be obtained, there would be a superabundance of cloth for every one, but as it is, with all the exertions of the ladies, it will be difficult to clothe those at home, and to make clothes for our brave volunteers.  

[LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, September 6, 1862, p. 1, c. 4       
                During our short visit to the country we found it a hive of industry.  Cards, wheels, looms and knitting-needles were performing nearly perpetual motion in every house.  There are several incentives to this spirit of home labor—necessity for home clothing—clothing for relatives and friends in the army—and clothing for soldiers in the army who have neither friends nor relatives at home.  Ample prices will be paid for all things made for the army. . . .

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, September 10, 1862, p. 2, c. 6       
                Mr. M. S. Hamilton, of Jefferson county, writes as follows:
                "Any person who has two pairs of old cotton cards, that are not rusty, may make one good pair out of them, by taking out the teeth, selecting the best leathers and resetting the teeth.  I have fixed up a pair in this way, which have been in use three or four weeks, and which, my wife says, work as well as new ones.  The operation is a tedious one, but will pay in these times." 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, September 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 7       
                The greatest wants of Arkansas, just now, are a "good governor," and cotton cards. 

[LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, September 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 4       
                Socks for the Soldiers.—Our contemporary of the Hinds County Gazette calls the attention of the ladies of the Confederate States to the wants of the soldiers in the article of socks. Says he:
                The season is not far distant when our soldiers in the field will require good, thick, wool socks.  Each man will require two pairs, at least, and there being possibly 700,000 men in service, 1,400,000 pairs will be necessary.  Are our people prepared to furnish their just proportion?  We hear of considerable wool in the country, but it is neither carded nor spun.  Cannot the State make some arrangement whereby the wool in the hands of our people can be converted into yarn, that it may be fabricated into socks for the soldiers?  The knitting needles of our indefatigable Southern women should now be at work.  

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], October 18, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Pioneer
Cotton Card Factory.

                We beg to inform the public that, after much delay and expense, our Card Factory is in successful operation, with a machine direct from Baltimore, and wire enough to make twelve thousand pairs.  We hope soon to be able to turn out forty or fifty pair daily.  At first the prices will necessarily be high, but in a short time we think they can be produced at such rates as will enable the poorest to procure them.  It is our object to benefit the country, and therefore we will sell to parties representing neighborhoods or counties, where satisfactory evidence is furnished that they are to be distributed at the factory prices.  At present we cannot sell Cards for money, but in order to get a supply of hard tanned sheep skins, we will buy from parties desiring to purchase Cards, and give Cards in exchange; so the first skins delivered at Cartersville will certainly get the first Cards.  We believe the Cards will compare favorable with Whittemore's best.  That is a matter for the people to determine.  They have been tested and pronounced excellent.
                                  
Anderson, Adair & Co., Atlanta
                                  
Fort & Hargrove, Rome,
Will act as our agents to receive and exchange Cards for Skins.
                                                                               
John L. Divine,       }
                                                                               
B. F. Jones,            } Prop'r
                                                                               
J. A. Lee,               }
oc18 1 m
Intelligencer, Constitutionalist and Rome papers copy.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, October 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 1 
                A meeting was held in Talladega county on Monday last, to provide for levying a tax to support the families of absent soldiers, at which resolutions were unanimously adopted instructing their representatives in the Legislature to vote for a tax sufficient to secure the families of soldiers from the county against want.  A move was also made to raise a fund to purchase cotton cards for the county, and over $3,000 was subscribed on the spot.  

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 4, 1862, p. 3, c. 2
               
Cotton Cards.—A Cotton Card Factory is now in successful operation at Rome, Georgia, with wire enough, as the manufacturers say, for twelve thousand pairs.  The cards at present are sold only for hard tanned sheepskins.
   

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, November 8, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
There is great cry made all the time for clothing for the soldiers.  Why don't those in authority take some measures to provide cards for the people, and then it will not be difficult to manufacture the clothing.  If our county court would take some action to procure cards for the county, they would enable many a family to provide for its own support.  Cards are what are wanted.  A wagon load bro't from Matamoras would well supply the county.   

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], November 16, 1862, p. 3, c. 1

Pioneer Cotton Card Factory.

                Messrs. Divine, Jones and Lee have at great expense, commenced the manufacture of Cotton Cards at Cartersville in this State.
               
The demand for cards far exceeds their capacity, though they are now turning out thirty pairs a day and will soon increase it to fifty.  They exchange one pair of cards for five hard tanned sheep skins.  They want the skins for making the cards.   Any one can tell what is meant by 'hard tanned' by looking at the leather in which the card teeth are set in any pair of cards.
               
We recently published an article from a manufacturer, urging the importance of giving these enterprising gentlemen increased facilities by the State or Government to enable them to furnish repairs and new cards to the various manufactories of cotton.  We now beg to call the attention of capitalists and the Legislature to this important enterprise for their investigation, and would say that too much importance cannot be attached to this enterprise, especially if the blockade is to continue.  People cannot fight without clothes, and cannot make clothes without cards--so it is better that every encouragement and aid be given to enlarge this important establishment.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, November 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

To the Women of the South.

                The following communication comes to us from Chapel Hill, N. C., and we cheerfully comply with the pious and patriotic wishes of the lady who sends it to us.  This appeal to the women of the South comes evidently from a warm heart, and the touching and eloquent language in which it is expressed, indicates cultivation and polished strength in the mind from which it emanated.  We heartily endorse the proposition of the fair writer:       
                To the Editor of the Advertiser—Sir:  I wish to make public through your columns and those of various other influential journals, a suggestion to the women of the South. . . .                             
                In places and churches where female prayer-meetings are usual, let the women themselves order the matter.  Where such meetings are not practicable, let every woman in her own house stop all work at the hour named—suspend the carding, and spinning, and knitting, and weaving, and sewing, and teaching—if for only one half hour—and let every woman's heart be lifted then in prayer for her country. . . .

SAN ANTONIO HERALD, November 22, 1862, p. 2, c. 2       
                A Good Example.--We saw a day or two ago, an excellent quality of jeans, which was manufactured in this place.  The cotton and wool were carded and spun, and the cloth woven by the ladies of one of our wealthiest families.  They have produced a sufficient quantity to clothe the family, white and black, and to give liberally to destitute soldiers.  We should like to give the names of these useful and patriotic ladies, but as true merit is generally modest, we fear such notice might be offensive. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, November 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 1       
                Old silk dresses unraveled, carded and spun, either alone or with cotton, will make excellent cloth and something very beautiful for female wear.  Silk is very warm. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, November 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 2       
                On the 1st inst., the legislature of Alabama appropriated two millions of dollars for the relief of the indigent families of soldiers from that State.  The legislature of Arkansas has appropriated one million and two hundred thousand dollars for the same purpose.  Besides this, it has provided for sending corn to counties where it is scarce, and has in contemplation bills to procure supplies of salt, cotton cards and other necessary articles.  These things, when made known to the brave soldiers, will give them assurances that their families are cared for, the State and make them endure the hardships of a camp life with more patience. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
                Cotton Cards.--The Camden Herald, Ark. informs us that a Mr. Barber has completed a machine in that place for making card teeth, which is probably now in operation.  The editor says persons having old card backs can find ready sale for them there, and we suppose they can get cards in return.
   
             We also notice that a comb manufactory is in operation not far from Camden.  It thus appears that our neighboring State is fast becoming independent of the Yankees and Yankee notions.   

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 3, 1862, p. 2, c.2  
                Clinton, La., Nov. 20--The principal part of the machinery, brought to this place from the Baton Rouge Penitentiary, was destroyed by fire this morning at 3 o'clock.  It is believed to be the work of an incendiary.  The machinery cannot be replaced; all the spindle frames, some looms and carding machines were burnt. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 3, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Wants of the Texas Troops.

                                                                                                LaGrange, Nov. 24th, 1862.      
                Eds. News:--A citizen of this county has just returned from our army in Arkansas, and the news that he brings is bad enough, not that our army has been whipped, but that our army is naked and shoeless, and from the fact that they are without clothing and in a colder climate than our own, there is much sickness and many deaths.  Texas will lose more men this winter for want of good warm clothing than she has lost in every battle since this war commenced.--The cry is coming from every part of the State, clothing for the army! but the people have not got it, and notwithstanding the abundance of cotton and wool, they cannot supply it for the want of cotton cards.--Now, sirs, the question is, who is to blame?  I answer emphatically Gov. Lubbock.  The penitentiary, which belongs to the people of Texas and over which the Governor has complete control as long as he is Governor, makes annually 1,500,000 yards of cloth, running ordinary time, which, if all appropriated in the right way, would amply clothe fifty thousand men.  But, sirs, what are the facts?  We have not got fifty thousand men in the field, and probably not fifteen thousand are clothes from that institution, the balance must either go naked and die of cold, or their friends must furnish them.-- . . . Fayette. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, December 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

From Milledgeville.
[Correspondence of Savannah Republican.]

                                                                                                              Wednesday, December 3.

House.

. . . The special order, the bill to protect the rights of married women.  Mr. Gibson moved, as a test question, to lay the bill on the table for the present.  The ayes were 85, nays 43.  This is considered equivalent to killing the bill. . .

Cotton and Wool Cards.

                The House on yesterday passed the measure relating to a supply of cotton and wool cards.  The bill proposes to authorize the Governor to pay Messrs. Lee & Co. sixty thousand dollars for a half interest in their works, and to furnish half the means necessary to duplicate twenty machines.  It is stated that they can be made in a few weeks at the Penitentiary, and put in operation.  Estimating the work of each machine at 30 pairs daily, these machines would turn out 15,000 pairs a month.  This would very soon supply the wants of the State, and enable our heroic women to clothe the people without resort to the arbitrary measures of seizing factories.  It would save also a great portion of the appropriation of $1,500,000 for clothing the soldiers.  Therefore, this cotton card measure is of the highest importance, and should be disposed of without delay, and in a liberal spirit.  Sixty thousand collars is considered by some a high price for half the establishment.  Messrs. Lee & Co. are entitled to a handsome reward for their timely foresight and the risk incurred in getting through this invaluable machine.  They can get it duplicated elsewhere, and enjoy a monopoly of the business, while if the State will take an interest in it, her citizens will reap the benefit, and she will secure a certain return for the investment in a few weeks.  Whatever objection there may be to the principle of State aid, in this instance, it is to be hoped that there will be no delay in efforts to improve a bill matured by the committee after patient investigation.
               
Other States are seeking to secure the works of Messrs. Lee & Co., and Georgia should not suffer an enterprise of such inestimable importance to be moved from her borders, or appropriated for the benefit of others.   

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, December 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Georgia Cotton Cards.—A correspondent of the Augusta Chronicle, writing from Milledgeville, says:
               
A box of cotton cards manufactured by Messrs. Lee & Co., Cartersville, were exhibited at the Milledgeville Hotel to-day.  They are perfect models of the Whittemore card, and are made on a Whittemore machine, which was brought through from Baltimore by some of the enterprising members of the firm.  They sell the cards at $10 per pair.  I saw a letter from Gov. Shorter, of Alabama, inquiring on what terms 50,000 to 100,000 pairs could be furnished for that State, and offering to make any advance necessary to facilitate the contract.  It is proposed for the State to take an interest in the establishment, and members of the firm are here now to negotiate some arrangement by which the State shall be supplied.  These cards formerly cost about 15 cents a piece at wholesale, and a supply ought to be furnished the State at prime cost, which is about $3 per pair at present.  Messrs. Lee & Co. deserve credit for putting the price of them at even $10 when the demand is clamorous at $25 and $30 per pair.  They have secured a splendid enterprise and well deserve any harvest it may reap them.  If the women who can use them were promptly supplied, there would be little occasion for the sue of the $1,500,000 appropriated to clothe and shoe the soldiers.
   

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, December 6, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
               
The Almanac Extra says that cotton cards are being manufactured in Williamson county, samples of which are pronounced by good judges to be O. K. 

[LITTLE ROCK] WEEKLY ARKANSAS GAZETTE, December 6, 1862, p. 1, c. 4 
                We last week published a list of the Acts passed up [to] that time.  We subjoin now, from the True Democrat, the remainder of the list: . . .   
                An act to encourage the manufacture of salt, iron, and cotton cards. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, December 10, 1862, p. 1, c. 2       
                We have before us a sample of cloth, manufactured by Mr. John Cox, of this county, the filling of which is spun without the use of cards.  The cloth, though not as smooth as could be desired, is very strong and will answer every purpose until we can gain our independence.  Arrange your cotton simply with the hand into a convenient size, and draw the thread slowly and you can make a very good filling for negro clothing.  Fresh ginned cotton is the best.—Sandersville Georgian.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, December 10, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Special Correspondence of the Augusta Constitutionalist  
Georgia Legislature.

                                                                                                                             Milledgeville, Dec. 4.          
                I believe I alluded, a day or two ago, to the specimens of cards on exhibition here from the manufactory of Messrs. Lee & co., Cartersville.  They are fac similes of the old Whittemore card, and are made on a Whittemore machine, which ran the blockade.  In accordance with the recommendation of the Governor, endorsed also by Peter Jones, Esq., Master Armorer at the Penitentiary, it is proposed that the State take a half interest in the enterprise, and duplicate a number of the machines, for immediate use.  A measure has been matured [sic?] by the Finance Committee, and passed the House to-day, authorizing the Governor to pay Messrs. Lee & Co., $60,000 for a half interest in their establishment, and to furnish half the capital necessary to duplicate twenty machines for the enlargement of their works.          
                It is stated that they can be made in three months at the Penitentiary, and put in operation.  Estimating that each machine will make 30 pairs of cards daily, these would turn out 600 pairs a day, or about 15,600 pairs a month.  This would very soon supply the wants of the State, and give the women facilities for clothing not only their families at home, but the soldiers in the field.  It would make the people independent of extorting factories, and save also a portion of the $1,500,000 appropriated to clothe and shoe the Georgia troops.  
                Estimating these cards at $10 a pair (and they cannot be had elsewhere for twice the amount,_ the income derived from the use of these twenty machines would be $1,872,000 in twelve months.  Four-fifths of this sum would probably be net profit, yielding to the State in one year, the handsome revenue of $750,000 in an investment of $60,000.—This is on the assumption that the State charge the same that the firm now sells them at. 
                But it is a part of the proposed contract that the State may furnish them to her citizens at cost, which will be between $2 and $3, per pair.  However this may be, the aggregate profit to the people of the State is the same.  Therefore this cotton card measure is of the highest importance, and should be disposed of without delay and in a liberal spirit.  Sixty thousand dollars it is urged, is a high price for such an establishment.  It is a very moderate sum for a business capable of yielding the enormous revenue above stated.   
                Messrs. Lee & Co. are entitled to a handsome reward for their timely foresight, and the hazard of life and money incident to getting such an invaluable machine through the lines.  They are not only entitled to a liberal return for the risks incurred, but to the highest consideration as benefactors to the country.  They are selling cards at $10, as fast as they can make them, when there is a clamorous demand for them at $30.  They are willing to accept the proposal made by the State, first, because it gives them a fair consideration for the interest, and because it will specially give them facilities for approximating the demand for cards.    
The investment proposed by the State redound to the immediate benefit of her citizens, and return to the treasury the amount expended, in a few weeks, when the price of cards can and should be put down to a fair remunerative standard.  whatever objection there may be to State aid, in general principles, this is a time and an occasion when the State may wisely step in to aid in relieving the necessities of her people by the proposed investment in a private enterprise.  Every State will act wisely to secure if possible, similar facilities for clothing the people.  As time is precious, it is to be hoped that there will be no delay in efforts to improve the bill offered by the committee after mature deliberation.                         
                                                                                                Aristides.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, December 11, 1862, p. 2, c. 1       
                Cotton Cards are now made in Cartersville, Ga., by Divino, Jones & Lee, at the rate of 30 per day and will soon increase to 50.  They exchange 1 pair of cards for 6 hard tanned sheep skins, which are used in making the cards. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 7
               
Cotton Cards.—The Milledgeville correspondent of the Macon Telegraph, under date Dec. 3d, says:
               
One of the most important measures of the session passed the House on yesterday relating to a supply of cotton and wool cards.  The bill proposes to authorize the Governor to pay Messrs. Lee &  Co. $60,000 for a half interest in the establishment, and to furnish half the means necessary to duplicate 20 machines.  It is stated that they can be made in 3 months at the Penitentiary and put in operation.  Estimating the work of each machine at 80 pairs daily, these machines would turn out 600 pairs daily, or about 15,500 pairs per month.  This would very soon supply the wants of the State, and enable our heroic women to clothe every soldier and citizen without resort to the arbitrary measure of seizing factories.  It would save also a great portion of the appropriation of $1,500,000 for clothing the soldiers.  Therefore, this cotton card measure is of the highest importance, and should be disposed of without delay, and in a liberal spirit.  Sixty thousand dollars may look like a high price for half the establishment.
   

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, December 16, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

Cotton Cards.

                A correspondent of the Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel, says:
    
           A box of Cotton cards manufactured by Messrs. Lee & Co., Cartersville, were exhibited at the Milledgeville Hotel to-day.  They are perfect models of the Whitmore card, and are made on a Whittemore machine, which was brought through from Baltimore by some of the enterprising members of the firm.  They sell the card at $10 per pair.  I saw a letter from Gov. Shorter, of Alabama inquiring on what terms 50,000 to 100,000 pairs could be furnished for that State, and offering to make any advance necessary to facilitate the contract.  It is proposed for the State to take an interest in the establishment, and members of the firm are here now to negotiate some arrangements by which the State shall be supplied.  These cards formerly cost about 15 cents a piece at wholesale, and a supply ought to be furnished the State at prime cost, which is about $3 per pair at present.  Messrs. Lee & Co. deserve credit for putting the price of them at even $10, when the demand is clamourous at $25 and $30 per pair.  They have secured a splendid enterprise, and will deserve any harvest it may reap them.  If the women who can use them were promptly supplied, there would be little occasion for the use of the $1,500,000 appropriated to clothe and shoe the soldiers.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 17, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Homespun.

                The Caddo, Louisiana, Gazette says:        
                We are much pleased to find that many papers have entered the list in favor of homespun.  During the embargo under the administration of Mr. Madison, the richest and finest ladies in the country vied with each other who could produce the handsomest homespun dresses.  Old pieces of silk were picked, carded, spun, wove, and made into dresses.  Many of them equalled the finest silks and cambrics. . . .        

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, December 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Home Provisions for 1863.

                Mr. Loughery,             
                Sir:  Being credibly informed that there is a great deal of destitution and want existing among the families of indigent soldiers (now in the confederate armies) both in this and other counties in the State; and that our soldiers complain that their families are not properly cared for, and from this cause others are deterred from entering the service.  The subject is one of vital importance to our country, and in my opinion needs only to be known in order to be promptly redressed.  There is enough wealth and patriotism in Harrison county to support and give ample employment to every destitute family in the county, and never miss the amount thus given.  To effect this object at once, and make it available for the year 1863, I will suggest the following propositions to the people of this county: 
                1st.  Let two books for subscription be opened in Marshall forthwith:  one at the store of G. G. Gregg & Co., the other at the office of B. F. Friderici; the signers entering opposite their names the amount, either in money, provisions, wool or cotton, they are willing to give for the year of 1863.      
                2nd.  So soon as $15,000 dollars is subscribed, let a meeting of the donors be called, and such rules and regulations be passed as they may deem necessary, to ensure the faithful collection and distribution of the amount subscribed.          
                3rd.  To assist in the clothing of our army, a portion of the means thus subscribed, to be applied to the purchase of cards, wheels, looms, &c., and those families who are destitute of these articles to be supplied with them gratis, and the goods made by them (after clothing their own families) to be delivered to the agent, who will pay them the full value of the goods.   
                4th.  That B. F. Friderici be selected as the agent to make all purchases and distribution of provisions to all families in the county in indigent circumstances, and that he be paid for this service such price as the donors may designate.  The scanty pittance heretofore allowed by the County to a few families and the exorbitant price now asked for the necessaries of life, strictly enjoins on us the execution of a duty; one which we owe to our God, our country, our fellow-creatures, and ourselves, to support and cherish the families of those men who stand manfully between us and our foes, and cheerfully surrender their lives in defense of our homes and firesides, our country, liberty, and independence.     
                These considerations should prompt one and all who are able to come forward and subscribe liberally towards this laudable object, for unless our holy cause is sustained, that which we may now give freely will not be ours to bestow. 
                For the purpose above mentioned I will give $250 per annum (should this sum be deemed not enough for me, I will double it) and pay it either in money, provisions, wool, or cotton.                              
                                                                                                W. R. D. Ward.  

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, December 20, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Wool Rolls for Sale

                The undersigned takes this method of informing his customers that their wool [is?] carded.  Others who have their names entered may bring in their wool.  We can card it without delay.  I have some wool rolls and boys' russetts for sale.                  
                H. Ward.    
Dec. 20, 1862.

THE SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], December 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Cotton Cards.

                Our Milledgeville correspondent states that the Cotton Card Manufactory of Lee & co., Cartersville, has been removed to the State Penitentiary, where is will be in operation the present week.  In a few weeks other machines will be duplicated, and they will be enabled to fill very heavy orders.  It is the design of the State authorities to put the cards at a small margin on cost, which in the course of a few months will enable families to supply themselves with cards at about $5 00 a pair.
    
           Our correspondent also states that the report put in circulation by an Atlanta paper, that a firm in Columbus have run a set of machines through the blockade, is a mistake.  A mechanic is engaged in trying to invent a machine there, but it is not in operation.--Chron. & Sent.   

 [LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 4       
                What is Jute?—We give below, a letter from a very intelligent gentleman of our acquaintance in answer to this enquiry.  Having visited or resided in England, and being posted in such matters, he writes of what he knows:  
                Editor True Democrat—Jute is soft hemp; an article hard to find. . . .  As soon as flax spinners stocks run out they would again become buyers and derange prices considerably.  Cotton spinners, I think, would find that jute and hemp were not cotton, spun in a cotton mill, and that they had better buy the yarn at the flax mills, and that altering cotton machines meant throwing them away and replacing them by new, coarse, strong flax machinery.—Hemp, flax and jute are a yard wide, more or less and if they were but an inch long, they could not be put on a cotton card without tearing it to pieces. . . .

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 2       
                Editor of the News:--In your issue of the 10th inst., I notice a call by you for "information in relation to tanneries in Texas and what efforts are being made for a supply of leather--also in regard to domestic manufactures, such as shoemaking, spinning and weaving by the old fashioned spinning wheels and hand looms."
                I can answer for Washington and a considerable portion of the adjoining counties. . . .  As to "spinning and weaving by the old fashioned spinning wheel and hand loom," there is a general movement in that direction everywhere.  Looms and wheels are being made by the thousands, and every family who have been so fortunate as to procure cards, are manufacturing quantities of the most excellent cloth.  But the scarcity and ruinous high prices of the cards operates with many poor families, as a sufficient barrier to prevent them from doing anything at all towards clothing themselves, even.  Certainly the card speculators are striving to force the community back into the use of the primitive fig leaf apron again.    
                It is not worth while to say anything about what the managers of the State government might have done to aid the people in procuring cards.  They be d----d, but if the people had the cards, I am sure I tell the truth, when I assert that the whole country would be instantly converted into one grand efficient manufacturing establishment.  And from the thousands of buzzing wheels and clattering looms, propelled by willing hands and loving hearts; the ready made clothing and substantial blankets would flow to our armies, as free as water.  There are few soldiers in the service, who have not a female relative or friend at home, who would take delight in having the opportunity to clothe him during the war.  I know of what I speak, and the drawback to all this, is intentionally produced by a black hearted set of enemies to our cause.                                                                                                                                                         THINE GID.       

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, December 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
               
Cotton cards were selling at $25.00 per pair, at Star Hill last week, and other things in proportion.  There were about fifty pairs left.   

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, December 27, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
Cotton Cards.  We learn from the Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel that the cotton card manufactory of Messrs. Lee & Co., Carterville, has been removed to the State Penitentiary at Milledgeville, Ga.  In a few weeks other machines will be duplicated, and that they will be enabled to fill very heavy orders.  It is the design of the authorities of the Empire State to put the cards at a small margin on cost, which in the course of a few months will enable families to supply themselves with cards at about $5 pair.   

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
            Cotton Cards.--The Augusta Chronicle, Ga. says Messrs. Lee & Co. have manufactured a box of cotton cards which are a perfect model of Whitmore's, having been made on a Whitmore machine brought from Baltimore.  They are sold at $10 a pair.  It is said Messrs. Lee & Co., desire to take contracts to supply States, and surely our State ought not to lose such an opportunity to provide our people with an article of the greatest necessity.  It said those cards formerly sold for 15 cents a piece at wholesale and can be supplied to the State at $300 [$3.00?] per pair at present.  The State might be saved millions of dollars in the supply of clothing to our troops, by having our people supplied with the cards to make the clothing instead of having to pay the present enormous prices.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, December 31, 1862, p. 1, c. 2

(Communicated.)
Mr. Phax and Mr. Figgers continue their
Conversation.

                Mr. Phax.  It is admitted, even by the speculators and extortioners, that unless this rapacious spirit is checked, our cause will be ruined. . . .
                P.  Let us hope that the courts will do this.  In counties where corn is scarce, if they would send off, get a boat load of corn, have it ground, and then supply each family with enough meal to last during the winter, that step would be a great one.  Cotton cards are to be had.  Speculators can get salt and cards.  If a county would get as many of these as possible and distribute them, another point would be gained.  Have a depot or place where provisions could be obtained.  It would not take long, or a great amount of money, to place the people beyond the reach of starvation.  Then go to work to get shoes and cloth; gather old iron to have it ready to mend plows; furnish wood to those living in towns.  They could do it, and make the money go twice as far.  Give a hundred men five dollars each to buy provisions, and another man five hundred dollars, and the one man will be able to buy twice as much as the hundred.  Speculators get cloth, domestic, cotton cards and salt.  They can get these things, and sell them at outrageous profits.  So could a county, or any set of men, to distribute to the needy, and sell at fair prices. . . .       

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 31, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
                Cotton Cards.--The Augusta Chronicle, Ga. says Messrs. Lee & Co. have manufactured a box of cotton cards which are a perfect model of Whitmore's, having been made on a Whitmore machine brought from Baltimore.  They are sold at $10 a pair.  It is said Messrs. Lee & Co., desire to take contracts to supply States, and surely our State ought not to lose such an opportunity to provide our people with an article of the greatest necessity.  It said those cards formerly sold for 15 cents a piece at wholesale and can be supplied to the State at $300 [$3.00?] per pair at present.  The State might be saved millions of dollars in the supply of clothing to our troops, by having our people supplied with the cards to make the clothing instead of having to pay the present enormous prices.

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, January 1, 1863, p. 2, c. 5 
                Cotton Card Manufactory.—We learn from the Atlanta Confederacy that a full set of machines for manufacturing Cotton Cards has been run through the blockade, and arrived at Columbus, Ga.  This makes the second card making machine that has been brought into Georgia by the enterprise of the citizens. 

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, January 6, 1863, p. 2, c. 4 
                Cotton Cards.—Cotton cards are now being made at the Georgia Penitentiary, at the rate of thirty pairs per day.  Skins of sheep, goats or dogs will be taken in exchange at present, as it is the desire of the factory to get skins on hand to work up.  The cards are worth six dollars a pair. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, January 7, 1863, p. 3, c. 1 
                The Milledgeville Union says the Georgia Penitentiary will soon be able to turn out 300 pairs of cotton cards per day, and in a few months, it is hoped the machinery will be increased so as to turn out 900 pairs per day.  For the manufacture of cards, sheep, dog or goat skins are necessary, and those who want cards are requested to send in those skins, either tanned or untanned. 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, January 7, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

(Communicated.)
Mr. Phax proposes Remedies for Extortion.

            Mr. Figgers.   I have not seen a paper published in the Confederacy which has not contained something condemnatory of speculators and extortioners.  Yet they propose no remedy and content themselves with warnings, denunciations and expressions of contempt. . . . 
            P.  Here our government has not the power, or if it has, it is not expedient to exercise it.  But a few men in every community can do this.  Within the past month at San Antonio, Texas, a supply association was formed.  Flour fell from forty dollars to fifteen dollars a hundred in a week.  So of other things.  I see by their papers that meetings are held, and like associations are being formed in other counties.  Speculation is killed there as far as necessaries are concerned.  A supply association here, with a few energetic men, could supply the poor with necessaries, and procure cloth, cotton cards and other things, when opportunity offered. . . . 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, January 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
We see it stated that there is a manufactory of cards in Georgia for carding cotton, wool, &c.  This is a very necessary instrument of domestic economy and in great demand.  We learn that after a few days our readers will be able to supply themselves with the article in this city.  A very ingenious and worthy gentleman is now getting his machinery ready for manufacturing them, and within a week will be able to furnish a supply.--Mobile Tribune.
   

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, January 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 6
               
Cotton Cards.—We have received a number of letters inquiring the price of cotton cards manufactured at the Penitentiary, and the chances of purchasing.  In reply, we state that the machinery is running day and night which will soon be increased and that the cards (No. 1s, [10?] the only size manufactured) are sold daily at six dollars per pair, to the widows of deceased soldiers, and to the wives now in the army; but that preference will be given to those persons who may bring sheep and goat skins, (raw or tanned) for which an exchange of cards will be made.  Mr. Jones, the head machinist, has informed us that he is doing all in his power to supply the demand, in relation to which we design to make weekly reports for the benefit of all interested.—[Milledgeville Recorder.
   

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], January 9, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
We learn from the Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel that the cotton card manufactory of Messrs. Lee & Co., Cartersville, has been removed to the State Penitentiary at Milledgeville, Ga.  In a few weeks other machines will be duplicated, and they will be able to fill every heavy order.  It is the design of the authorities of the Empire State to put the cards at a small margin on cost, which in the course of a few months will enable families to supply themselves with cards at about $5 a pair.  This will be bad news for the speculators in those articles of necessity.
   

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, January 10, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
The True Issue says that Fayette county has received from the State Penitentiary, 86 bolts of Lowels for the destitute families of soldiers.
               
The True Issue learns from Mr. M. F. Rodgers, of Georgetown, that he has contracted with the Military  Board to furnish them 90,000 pair of Cards, 10,000 of them to be wool cards, to be delivered within six months, and distributed among the several counties in the State.  We are glad to hear of this, and think this number properly distributed over the State, will enable every family to get a pair.   

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], January 12, 1863, p.  2, c. 5

Cotton Cards!

                The subscriber has for sale at Meridian, Mississippi, Twelve Hundred Pairs Cotton Cards without the backs, which he will sell in lots to any purchasers, in their present condition, or he will contract to deliver them ready for use in a short time.
    
           To persons wishing to transport them to a distance, their present form is desirable, as two hundred pairs occupy a space of only three cubic feet and weight about seventy-five pounds.  They are of the most approved manufacture, and any carpenter can supply the backs.
    
           A note addressed to the undersigned, through the mail, will receive prompt attention.
                                                                                               
                W. C. Harkins,
ja12                                                                                                                         Meridian, Miss.   

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 13, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
               
Cotton Cards.—Cotton cards are now being made at the Georgia Penitentiary at the rate of thirty pairs per day.  Skins of sheep, goats or dogs will be taken in exchange at present, as it is the desire of the factory to get skins on hand to work up.  The cards are worth $6 a pair.  Let those who can furnish skins to that amount and forward to the Penitentiary and receive cards in exchange.   

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, January 13, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

Cotton Cards

                On consignment and for sale by Hardy & Kelly. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 20, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
Cotton cards were being manufactured in Williamson county, Texas, and were pronounced by judges to be good.   

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 20, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

Cotton Cards.

                Such being the demand, we promised to advise our readers weekly as to the progress of the manufacture of Cotton Cards in the State Prison, and the terms on which they can be obtained.  We have no change to announce.  The machine now in operation turns out twenty four pairs a day, which are sold at six dollars each.  Two other machines are nearly completed, and we learn that the increase will continue as rapidly as the machines can be made by the workmen, until about 300 pair shall be furnished daily.  In the meantime, persons who furnish sheep and goat skins will have the preference, and next to them soldiers' families.  The latter absorb the whole supply at present.                 Southern Recorder.   

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, January 22, 1863, p. 1, c. 5 
                Pioneer Cotton Card Factory.—Messrs. Divin, Jones & Lee have, at great expense, commenced the manufacture of cotton cards at Centersville, Georgia.                
                The demand for cards far exceeds their capacity, though they are now turning out thirty pairs a day, and will soon increase it to fifty.  They exchange one pair of cards for five hard-tanned sheep skins.  They want the skins for making the cards.  Any one can tell what is meant by "hard-tanned" by looking at the leather in which the card teeth are set in any pair of cards.  

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, January 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 3

Cotton Cards.

                Such being the demand, we promised to advise our readers weekly as to the progress of the manufacture of Cotton Cards in the State Prison, and the terms on which they can be obtained.  We have no change to announce.  The machine now in operation turns out twenty-four pairs a day, which are sold at six dollars each.  Two other machines are nearly completed, and we learn that the increase will continue as rapidly as the machines can be made by the workmen, until about 300 pairs shall be finished daily.  In the mean time, persons who furnish sheep and goat skins will have the preference, and next to them soldiers families.  The latter absorb the whole supply at present.--Southern Recorder, Jan. 13.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, January 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 5 
                An agent of the State of Florida has made arrangements for a supply of cards from the card making machines now in operation in Milledgeville, under the authority of Georgia. 

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, January 29, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Cotton Cards.

150 Pairs for sale at the drug store of SEARS & WITHERSPOON.  
Jan. 22, 1863.  

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, January 29, 1863, p. 2, c. 1 
                Cotton cards are being manufactured in Williamson County, Texas, and are pronounced by judges to be good. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, February 3, 1863, p. 3, c. 1
               
Woolen  Factory Burnt.—On Monday, the 12th instant, the large Wool Carding Factory, located near Lincolnton, N. C., accidentally took fire and was entirely consumed, together with all the machinery, much of which was entirely new.  The property was owned by Col. L. D. Childs, one of the proprietors of the Saluda Factory, near Columbia, S. C., who lost by a similar cause, some weeks since, an extensive cotton factory situated at the same place.  There was no insurance, and it is, consequently, a total loss.   

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, February 3, 1863, p. 3, c. 6
               
Dog skins make the best leather for the manufacture of cotton cards.  Those who supply dog skins can get cards in Milledgeville, manufactured at the Penitentiary, at six dollars per pair.  Money will not buy them—nothing but dog or other skins.  The great question is now presented to the people of Georgia whether they will do without dogs or clothes.                 [Aug. Chron.   

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, February 3, 1863, p. 3, c. 7

Cotton Cards.

                A small lot of best A No. 10 Cotton Cards (Whittemore Cards) on consignment, to be closed out immediately.
                                                                                                               
Rosette, Lawhon, & Co.
   

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, February 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 1

Cotton Cards.

(We take great pleasure in publishing the following communication, from a lady in Bell county, feeling assured it will serve a good purpose at this time in directing our readers where they may be supplied with an indispensable article:)
                                                                                               
SALADO, TEXAS, Feb. 2d, 1863
    
           We not unfrequently see in your columns expressions of applause in behalf of the domestic ladies in your city and surrounding country; and, though a more western and mountainous country, could not so hastily afford the facilities for home manufacture, we however flatter ourselves that we will furnish a parallel to the home productions of, perhaps, any county in Texas.  I am just now in receipt of a pair of nice cotton cards, of a most superior quality, manufactured by Mr. Eubank, of Williamson county.  My cards do excellent work, and I am highly pleased with them.  Quite a number of ladies in this vicinity are using cards manufactured by Mr. Eubank, and so far as I have been able to ascertain, entire satisfaction prevails with all who use them; many in our country, however, are yet unsupplied with cards.--Feeling assured that an enterprise of this nature cannot fail to enlist the earnest efforts of the public, and that it will be fully sustained and appreciated by the Government, as well as the people, I hope that all will soon be supplied, and we shall thus be enabled to furnish ourselves with the necessaries of life.                                     L.A.
   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, February 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 4 
                Those who have sheep or goat skins, raw or tanned, would do well to save them, as manufacturers of cotton cards are anxious to exchange for them.  They have machinery in the Georgia penitentiary which runs day and night.  They sell the cards at six dollars a pair, giving the preference to soldier's wives, and those who will exchange sheep or goat skins.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, February 19, 1863, p. 2, c. 1 
                In a short time the Governor of Georgia will have five or six machines completed for manufacturing cotton cards.  

THE SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], March 4, 1863, p. 2, c. 4

Cards.

                Good cards can be had at the Penitentiary in Milledgeville at $6 per pair, if paid in sheep, dog, goat, or horse skins, either tanned or untanned.  Fifty cents will be allowed for enough tanned leather to make a pair of cards, which is 5 inches by 22, and 25 cents for untanned skins.  If enough skins are sent to make more than one and less than two pair of cards, the remainder can be paid in money.   

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 6, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Cotton Cards.  On consignment, for cash, one gross of Whitmore's cotton card; also, cotton warp and sleys. . . . for sale at P. H. McGraw's.  feb6
   

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, March 7, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
               
Cotton cards are manufactured in Milledgeville, Ga., and sold to soldiers wives for $6 per pair.  They are now selling here for about $30.   

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

Cotton Cards and Teeth.

                The Mr. Barber, mentioned in the following notice from the Camden (Ark.) Herald, is the person who formerly lived in Natchez.
    
           We had the pleasure of witnessing a few days ago, the working of Mr. Barber's machine for making card teeth.  We shall not attempt any description of the machine, but will simply state that it is complete.  We had not time to see the number it could make in an hour; but any person who has ever seen a sewing machine at work, can imagine how many can be turned out in a given period, when informed that it makes about as many strokes to the minute as one of the fastest of them, and at every stroke a tooth is made.  Mr. Barber deserves much praise for the energy he has evinced in getting his machine going, and for the perseverance, patience and ingenuity displayed in its invention--it being unlike anything every before used for a similar purpose.  He draws his own wire, through plates made under his own direction; and perforates the leather with a machine of his own invention.  In short, the card factory is a home invented, home made institution.  As soon as Mr. B. can get a few pair put up to start on, he will notify the public to come up and supply themselves.
   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, March 18, 1863, p. 4, c. 4

Cotton Cards Manufactured in Selma.

                We do not know that we were ever made to feel greater pride for the intelligence and enterprise of our city than we were on Friday last, that being the day on which we received an invitation from our fellow citizen, J. M. Keep, to witness the operation of his machine for manufacturing cards.  It was really surprising to see a machine in all its beauty and perfection, claiming no other paternity than the genius, of a single man put into successful operation in Selma.—Until we saw it with our own eyes, we confess we were skeptical as to the possibility of such an achievement, but now all doubt is dissipated, for we have seen, to our satisfaction, the perfect demonstration of Mr. Keep's success.  He has not only succeeded in making cotton cards, but we will vouch that he has fairly beaten the Yankees themselves in the manufacture of this article of prime necessity.  The difficulties under which Mr. K. has labored in perfecting his nice piece of machinery have been such as would have app__ed a gentleman less philanthropic and persevering, and now that he has succeeded, we are sure that our people will rightly appreciate his labors.  Mr. Keep has proven himself a man of wonderful genius as well as a great benefactor.           
                The wire which forms the teeth of the cards is made by Mr. Keep, and is superior to that used in the manufacture of cards which have been brought from the North, or even from the old country, as has been proven by a scientific test.  He is now making another machine, simpler than the one already finished, and will continue to add new machines to his manufactory until he has a number sufficient to supply the demand for cards.               
                We learn from him that he will soon be ready to furnish the people with cotton cards at a reasonable price, notifications of which will appear by advertisement in the Reporter.—Selma Reporter.  

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, March 19, 1863, p. 2, c. 1     
                Gov. Shorter has succeeded in running through the blockade 4,344 pairs of cotton and wool cards, which are to be distributed to the different Counties of the State at a price equal only to cost and charges—say from $6 to $8 per pair.  Others are expected soon.  

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 19, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Here is Your Chance.  To arrive in two days:--300 pairs Whitmore's best Cotton Cards; 200 pairs Cotton Cards, Superfine; 300 lbs. Killikinick Smoking Tobacco; and for sale wholesale and retail, by Jos. Nehr, Pearl St., near the Post Office. mar19.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, April 1, 1863, p. 1, c. 2         
                The Richmond correspondent of the Charleston Mercury says a machine for making cotton carts [sic—cards] will be at work in that city in a few days. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

The Cotton Card Manufacture.

                On Tuesday last Gov. Brown sent a special measure to the Legislature in reference to the cotton card manufacturing enterprise in which the State has engaged as a partner.  The message was referred to a special committee.  We copy a report of its substance from the Macon Telegraph:
               
The Governor states that 100 pair cards could be turned out per day if there was on hand a supply of wire.  Engagements have been made with a firm in Dalton—Messrs. Russell, Brother & Co., to make wire, and parties are also engaged to import a supply through the blockade.  The exact cost of making a pair of cards is about $4.  Two new machines are completed, and three more well under way, with five more half done, and three large machines begun for making 44 inch card cloth for factories.  About 1,200 cards have been made since the purchase by the State, which have been sold for sheep and dog skins.  The Governor says that Messrs. Lee & Co. did not turn over more than wire enough to make 1,130 pair of cards, when they contracted to furnish enough to make 12,000, and recommends that the value of the wire be deducted from the sum to be paid for the Works.  He does not deem it best to purchase the remaining half interest, as, according to the contract, the State controls the Works as fully as though it owned them all, and the interest cannot be bought except at an exorbitant price.   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, April 8, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

A New Trick with Cards.

                Some six or eight weeks ago, handbills and circulars were sent all over the State, notifying country dealers and merchants that the subscriber thereto was prepared to furnish some 50,000 pairs of cotton cards, calicoes, and other things, on terms that would enable them to supply families at low rates.  A lively correspondence was soon opened with parties from every section of the State, and a large number of dealers, speculators, and some few who were desirous of benefiting their neighborhoods, visited the city to purchase cards and other things.  They were referred to George W. Curtis, a shrewd fellow, who was book-keeper in a well known commercial house in the West for many years, and known to a great many persons in the city.  The dealers were taken to a building on the river bank, and let to a cellar where boxes marked in the usual manner, with the numbers of pairs and the number of the size of the cotton cards were snugly stowed.  Curtis, it appears, made no secret that these cards were smuggled, and liable to confiscation, but that was the reason why he was enabled to sell them so cheaply, some heavy sales being effected at twelve hundred and fifty dollars for each one hundred pairs.  An open box or two of the cards were shown as samples.  Secrecy was enjoined, as it was desirable not to let the law officers get on the scent, and as the building was near the river, it was very easy for purchasers to quietly move their boxes on a boat and carry them off.—As the demand was so great, purchasers were advised to pay for their cargo and secure their boxes, which were to be delivered early in April.  Others engaged to take large quantities, one contract being to the tune of $30,000.  About the first of April, Curtis told a number of his patrons that he expected every hour a large lot of dry goods and needed money, and the parties might take the cards, or take part in cotton cards and part in dry-goods when the latter came.  Curtis, it appears, had a partner, whose name we did not learn and two or three others were in some way connected with the concern.  The whole party boarded at the Hayne's Hotel, and it appeared that the money received for the cards, or a good part of it was deposited with Haynes for safe keeping.  A few nights since the partner of Curtis, accompanied by another of the parties, presented an order to Mr. Haynes, from Curtis, for the money.  The paper money was in a box and some $1,000 in specie, in a bag.  Haynes took the money from the safe and delivered it to them, but the lateness of the hour excited his suspicions and he told them they had better leave the money and call for it in the morning.  They drew their pistols and prevented him from locking up the money again, took it up stairs to a room; but returned in a few minutes, handed him the box, said they were joking and went off.  As they had not returned the specie, Haynes followed them, overtook the one who had the gold, took his arm and walked with him down the street expostulating, until they came in sight of two or three soldiers on guard, when the fellow got scared, dropped the bag of gold and ran off.  Upon his return to the hotel, Mr. Haynes examined the box, and found the money had been abstracted and old newspapers put in its place.  The next morning, the buyers of cotton cards became uneasy and proceeded to examine their purchases, when, to their dismay, they found that each box had in it nothing but a few sticks of wood so arranged that they sounded like the handles of the cards rattling, and weighing about the same as a box of cards would weigh.—Curtis & Co., have vamosed the ranche, and the buyers of the cotton cards may be seen looking very blue, each with a small stick of wood under his arm. 
                Our lawyers are all busy discussing the question as to whom the $1,000 in gold belongs.  One says to Haynes, for the fellow dropped it at his feet, and Haynes is bound to retain it until called for.  Others say that it must be returned to those who paid the specie for cotton cards which they never received.  Still others, contend that it should be divided, prorata, among all the victims, those who paid paper as well as those who paid gold.  No decision has been arrived at, up to the time of our going to press, but the occurrence has given rise to any amount of witticisms and puns.  It was a well planned scheme, boldly carried out, and the victims have learned the force of the old adage "never buy a pig in a poke," which they alter to "never buy cotton cards in boxes." 

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, April 8, 1863, p. 2, c. 4
                                                                
                Warren, Texas, March 23d, 1863.
                Mr. Editor:   
                Having seen several pieces in your paper in regard to the war, our facilities for sustenance and defence, I take the liberty of requesting you to insert my opinion, if it is only the opinion of a native Texan girl. . .   Cotton cards have been procured, the loom and wheel have been brought into use, and nearly every family makes cloth enough for its own use, and some to spare.  My mother, whose family is small, has had upwards of two hundred yards of cloth woven within the last six months.  As to clothes, there will be no more trouble.  The ladies are quite independent. . .    
                                                                                                                                Katrina. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, April 15, 1863, p. 3, c. 3     
                Cotton Cards, intended for the families of soldiers, says the Huntsville Advocate, are now being distributed in the various counties in North Alabama.  The counties in this region have received their quota from Montgomery.  We hope they will all soon be in use, and another supply may be received at an early day. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 21, 1863, p. 3, c. 6
               
James C. Gibbes, of Columbia, S. C., has arrived from abroad, bringing with him machinery for making cotton cards and other purposes.
   

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, April 22, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Notice Extraordinary!

                The undersigned begs leave to inform the public that he has succeeded in introducing into this State two suits of double Wool Carding Machines and Picker, and has located the same at Prairie Lea, in Caldwell county, at the Mills of Mr. Thos. Mooney, on the San Marcos river.  The machinery will be in operation by the first of May next, and wool will be carded into rolls for hand spinning, for cash or wool, at reasonable rates, and rolls constantly on hand for sale.
               
Mr. Thos. Mooney, an old Texian, is favorably known to many, having resided many years at Prairie Lea, is interested in the carding business, and will fix price and terms for carding wool and the sale of rolls.  I have secured the services of a competent and experienced man in the person of Mr. S. S. Bryant, my father-in-law, to superintend the operative parts of the business, and can vouch for him in every particular, and I hope we may be able to give entire satisfaction to all who may favor us with their patronage, which we respectfully solicit.
               
Persons sending wool to the Factory to be carded will please observe the following suggestions:  Wash the wool clean before sending it to the factory, or request in writing to have it cleansed at the factory.  You need not pick the wool to pieces, only so much as is necessary to get the burs all out, but the burs must be all taken out before sending the wool to be carded.  Send one pound of clean fresh lard to every ten pounds of wool, and strong sheets or blankets to pin up the rolls in.
               
The above named machinery will turn off work enough to keep one thousand hand spinning sheets supplied with rolls and furnish filling for two thousand yards of plantation goods per day.
                                                                                                                               
Harris Hoyt.
               
Houston, April 21, 1863.
   

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, April 22, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

A Card.

                I take this opportunity to say to those planters with whom I have conferred on the subject of establishing a cotton and woolen factory, some of whom subscribed conditionally to the stock of the proposed Texas Manufacturing Company before I obtained a charter incorporating the same, which was granted at the last regular session of the Texas Legislature, that I have made arrangements for all the machinery for a cotton and woolen mill of any size or capacity desired, and if those planters who were in favor of establishing said manufactory, or any other responsible individual, or set of men in the State wish to establish a large or small cotton and woolen factory in Texas, and will furnish me the cotton at once to pay for the machinery, I will furnish it at such place and on such terms as may be agreed on, and I will turn over to them the said charter at what it is worth, and I will take stock if parties desire me to do so, and do all in my power to aid in establishing such an institution as the planters in this State need.
               
I beg leave to say, however, that I am not in favor of the South becoming a manufacturing people to a great extent, especially of the finer fabrics, but I am in favour of Texas and all the Confederate States becoming more self-reliant, and manufacturing plantation goods and producing in our glorious Confederacy every necessary of life we require.
               
With the sword in one hand and the plow and spindle in the other, and God on our side, we will gain our independence, and by economy, industry and temperance, and the productions of our soil, the Confederate States of America may become one of the wealthiest, the most independent and powerful nations on the globe—for if God be for us, who can be against us.
               
Any communications addressed to me at Brenham between this and the first day of May will receive attention.                                                             Harris Hoyt.   

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
               
A New Idea—Cotton Cards.—We are informed that there is a farmer in Washington county, who spins his cotton filling without the aid of cards.  The process is simple.  He goes to the gin house or lint room, puts the light flakes of cotton ginned into a basket, not packed, carries it to the spinning wheel, and the thread is made with rapidity.  With a little practice, more thread can be made in a day, than with the aid of cotton cards.  If kerseys are desired to be made, put cow hair into the gin with the cotton, and it will be thrown into the lint room nicely mixed.  The same process as above, will give him the filling he desires.  Will our farmers practice upon the important idea thrown out?—Milledgeville Recorder.    

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, April 29, 1863, p. 1, c. 4     
                We learn that Curtis, the chief or head of the cotton card swindlers, was met by Mr. S. Wilson, the sutler of  Col. Glenn's regiment, some few miles this side of Memphis.  Wilson brought him part of the way, but when within twenty miles of Little Rock, Curtis succeeded in effecting his escape.  We learn further, that Curtis gave up thirty-one or two thousand dollars in Confederate money and about eight in gold, which, we suppose, will be divided among his victims.  

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 6, 1863, p. 2, c. 4
               
We are happy to say that the Military Board has received a large number of superior cotton cards, which they intend to distribute to the several counties upon the basis of scholastic census.  A letter has been addressed to the Chief Justice of every county in the State to the effect that they will receive their pro rata by sending for them and paying the price fixed, viz:  $10 per pair in currency.  The Board requests the County Courts to make the distribution in such a way as will result in most good to the public, enjoining upon them that the needy families of those in the service be first supplied, and that, in no case shall a greater price be charged for the cards than the cost to the county, including transportation.  Should any county decline the offer of the Board, they are requested to notify them at once.  The Board are supplying these cards at the third of the ruling market price, and in distributing the present invoice will save the people from $150,000 to $200,000.
   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, May 6, 1863, p. 1, c. 4         
                Curtis, the cotton card man, has been arrested again; this time in western Arkansas.  A man named Cox, who was concerned in the swindle, and another, named Mitchell, were arrested with him.  Cox escaped, but Curtis and Mitchell are on their way here, and may be expected as the paroling officer seems to be about Batesville at present.  

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 13, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
Cotton Cards at $10 a Pair.—We have received the following circular, which we lay before our readers as a matter of great public interest, although we have before noticed the same matter:
                                                                               
Office of the Military Board,              }
                                                                               
Austin, April 28, 1863.                      }
To the Chief Justice of ________ County:
               
The undersigned, constituting the State Military Board, beg leave to inform you that they have succeeded in procuring several thousand pair of cotton cards of the very best manufacture, and that they have apportioned them to the counties on the basis of the scholastic census.
               
Your county will receive by sending for them ___ pairs.  The price is $10 per pair, in currency, payable at Austin on delivery.  We advise that several counties should combine in sending for their cards, thereby saving much expense.
               
The Board requests that these cards be distributed in such way as the County Courts may deem best for the public good.  Respectfully enjoining that the needy families of those in the army shall, in all cases, be first supplied, and in no case shall the cards be sold for a greater price than the cost to the County Courts, including transportation.
               
Should your County decline the offer, please notify us at once.  Very respectfully,
                                                                                                             
F. R. Lubbock, Governor.
                                                                                                             
C. R. Johns, Comptroller.
                                                                                                             
C. H. Randolph, Treasurer.
               
We have notified each county of their pro rata.  In distributing this lot of cards, the people will be saved over $200,000, independent of the effect it will have to put the price of cards down in speculator's hands.
   

[LITTLE ROCK] ARKANSAS TRUE DEMOCRAT, May 13, 1863, p. 1, c. 1     
                Curtis, the cotton card speculator, also arrived.  He does not deny his guilt, but says he went into the speculation in good faith, at the suggestion of others, supposing that goods would be bought and fairly disposed of, but that, after he got into it, other acknowledged it was to be a swindle and he agreed to carry out their plans.  He promises to make a clean breast of it and some rich developments are expected.  

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, May 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
               
The Military Board of Texas has issued the following Circular to the several counties of the State:
                                                                                               
Office of the Military Board,
                                                                                                               
Austin, April 28, 1863.
To the Chief Justice of _____ County:
               
The undersigned, constituting the State Military Board, beg leave to inform you that they have succeeded in procuring several thousand pairs of Cotton Cards, of the very best manufacture, and that they have apportioned them to the Counties on the basis of the Scholastic census.
               
Your County will receive by sending for them _____ pairs.
               
The price is $10 per pair, in currency, payable at Austin on delivery.  We advise that several Counties sho'd combine in sending for their Cards, thereby saving much expenses.
               
The Board requests that these Cards be distributed in such way as the County Courts may deem best for the public good; respectfully enjoining that the needy families of those in the army shall, in all cases, be first supplied, and in no case shall the  Cards be sold for a greater price than the cost to the County Courts, including transportation.
               
Should your County decline the offer, please notify us at once.
                                                                                               
Very Respectfully,
                                                                                               
F. R. Lubbock, Gov'nor,
                                                                                               
C. R. Johns, Comptroller
                                                                                               
C. H. Randolph, Treas'r.
               
Each County has been notified of its pro rata.  In distributing this lot of cards, the people will be saved over $200,000, independent of the effect it will have in putting down the price of them in the hands of speculators.   

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, May 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 1     
                The Texas Military Board has notified the Chief Justices of the several counties of the arrival of a large supply of cotton cards for distribution, and which are to be distributed to those most in need, on the basis of the scholastic census.  Price, ten dollars.  

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 22, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
Cargo Sale.—Messrs. LaRoche & Bell, Wednesday last, sold the cargo of the steamer President and others from Nassau.  The following prices were realized:  Turk's Island Salt, 53 to 85 cents per pound; Coffee, $3 to $3.60 per pound; Copperas, 75 cents to $1 per pound; Morphine, $23 per oz., Quinine, $23.50 to $25 per oz; Saltpetre, $2.15 per lb; Carb. Soda, $2.55 per pound; Cream Tartar, $1 per pound; Epson Salts, $1.25 per pound; Nails, $90 per keg; Matches, $12 per gross; Blankets, $19 per pair; Cotton Cards, $26 to $30 per pair; Prints, wide and narrow, $1.75 to $2.50 per yard; Ladies' Gaiters, $19.50 per pair; Misses; Gaiters, $14 per pair; Men's English Sewed Shoes, $14.50 per pair; Letter Paper, $45 to $50 per ream; Green Tea, $7 per pound; Ladies' Hose, $25 to $45 per dozen.   

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 26, 1863, p. 1, c. 4

Cotton Spinners' Convention.

                In conformity with a request published some time since, a meeting of the Cotton Spinners of the State was held at Atlanta, Ga., on the 15th of May.
               
There were present, John White, of Georgia Factory; Isaac Powell, High Shoals Factory; Hugh McLean, Agaudon Mill; Thomas Leslie, Troup Factory, and E. Steadman, Gwinnett Manufacturing Company.  On motion, John White was elected Chairman, and E. Steadman, Secretary.  After consultation the meeting agreed upon the following:

(Circular.)
To the Cotton Spinners of Georgia.

                In pursuance of a call made upon the Cotton Spinners of Georgia to assemble in Convention in the city of Atlanta, for the purpose of taking into consideration the best means of supplying the great destitution in Cotton Yarns, now being felt all over our State, the undersigned duly assembled.  After a deliberate examination of all the facts laid before us, towit:  the great scarcity of Cotton Yarns; the limited means of soldiers' wives and families; the probable continuance of this unholy war; and the apparent suffering that must continue to accrue to the families of our noble defenders on account of the scarcity of Yarns; and the almost impossibility of procuring Cotton Cards, we have determined to act upon the following plan, and earnestly request Cotton Spinners all over the State heartily to co-operate with us.
               
We hereby pledge ourselves to furnish to General Ira R. Foster, Quartermaster General of the State, one-eight of our production of Cotton Yarns weekly, at one-half the current prices at the time they are furnished.  These Yarns to be issued to the Inferior Courts of each county, and by them to be distributed to the destitute of their counties, as provided for by a resolution of the late Legislature.  These Yarns to be delivered by us at the nearest depot of transportation.
               
This plan cannot fail to commend itself to every patriot of the Empire State.—Thousands of our fellow citizens, clad in the armor of war, are on distant fields battling for our rights and cheerfully risking their lives in  defence of us, our homes and altars.  Their families are consigned to our care.  They are in great need of Yarns with which to weave them necessary clothing.  Cotton Cards cannot be procured.  Their only hope is in the factories of their State.  To them they appeal, and to them they surely will not appeal in vain.
                                                                                                                
John White,
                                                                                                                       
Georgia Factory.
                                                                                                                
Isaac Powell,
                                                                                                                       
High Shoals Factory.
                                                                                                                
Hugh MacLean,
                                        
                                                                                Aguadon Mill.
                                                                                                                 
Thos. Leslie,
                                                                                                                         
Troup Factory.
                                                                                                                  
E. Steadman,
                                                                                                   
Gwinnett Manufacturing Company.

____

                                                                                             Quartermaster  General's Office,        }
                                                                                                         
Atlanta, May 15, 1863.        }
               
The above circular is sent forth with the earnest hope, that every cotton spinner in Georgia will cheerfully and promptly respond to its appeal and act upon its plan.
               
I know of no act by which proprietors of factories can more surely nerve the arms of our brave soldiers, than by furnishing thread, by which the loved ones at home can be comfortably clad and protected from the rigors of a coming winter.  A failure to respond will result in much suffering among the families of those who have sacrificed their all for our defense and our comfort.  Let it be remembered that without the aid of factories, thread cannot be obtained, and the destitute poor cannot be clad.  Let the families of our soldiers be fed and clothed, and they will more cheerfully and patiently bear the toils and suffering of the camp, and more gallantly meet the assault of the enemy.  Let them be neglected, and dissatisfaction on the part of many, and desertion in some, will inevitably follow.  How much then depends upon the action of our  cotton spinners in this matter.
               
In behalf of the destitute families of our gallant soldiers who appeal to the cotton spinners of  Georgia, we appeal with confidence that they will not disappoint us, but will nobly and patriotically come to our aid in this our time of need.
               
The yarns so obtained will be furnished gratuitously to the destitute of our State.
                                                                                                                               
Ira R. Foster,
                                                                                          
Quartermaster General State of Georgia.
               
P.S.—Each daily of the State will copy the above three times—each weekly twice.  As the matter is one of charity, it is hoped that the charges for insertion will be as small as possible—if made.  Bills presented at the office will be paid.                                                                 I.R.F.                 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 30, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

To Prepare Wool for Carding.

                At the present time, when wool is so much needed, it may be well to state a few facts, that are not known to all:
    
           1.  Wool sheared from sheep that are well kept is much the best.
    
           2.  When the shearing operation is to be performed it should be done by a skillful, practised hand, as wool that is cut up in shearing always falls out of the cards and is lost.
    
           3.  The sooner wool is washed after shearing the better.  It should never be packed away in a close pile, and left to lie in that position, either washed or unwashed.
    
           4.   The washing operation is the most important of all.  A few years ago a premium was offered in one of the finest wool growing regions of Kentucky, for the best mode of washing wool.  The lot of wool that took the premium was washed after the following manner:  It was thrown into a pot of boiling water, and kept well stirred just one minute by the watch.  It was then instantly thrown out into water milk warm and washed, and then it passed through several tubs of water of common temperature, being washed all the while until it was thoroughly clean.  The writer has seen the thing tried, and it works finely.  Wool can be washed in this way without soap.  But especial care must be taken that the wool does not remain in the boiling water longer than one minute, as it is in danger of being ruined.  The philosophy of this quick scalding is to soften the gum, which is on all raw wool, so that it will wash off easily.
    
           5.  When the wool is washed it should be spread out thin at once to run, and kept stirred until it is thoroughly dried.  It should never be allowed to get wet after it is put out to dry.
    
           6.  Wool that has been dyed should have the dye stuff washed out thoroughly.  Wool should not be allowed to start to a carding machine, even in a damp condition.  It should be entirely dry.
    
           7.  When wool has been well handled in washing it will have a glossy appearance in the sun, no matter what the color of the wool.
   
            8.  Some lots of wool will waste more than others in carding, and it is difficult to account for it.  But clean wool that has been well handled in the manner above directed, should in no case lose more than one pound in eight or nine, and generally about one pound to ten.
    
           9.  But lastly, where there are no pains taken to fix wool up properly for carding, the owner should not complain, whether the rolls be few, or of an inferior quality.  The wool should be lifted out of the boiling water with a fork made for the purpose with several prongs.
   

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], June 17, 1863, p. 3, c. 5
Whitmore Cotton Cards.--A genuine article, on consignment, for sale by
June 17                                                                                                   I. M. Kenney.           

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 1, 1863, p. 2, c. 4

For Sale,
500 Pairs
No. 10 Cotton Cards,
In Lots to Suit Purchasers.

                                                                                                                H. Haym,
                                                                                                               
176 Broughton Street.
                                                                                                                               
Savannah.   

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 2, 1863, p. 3, c. 1
               
Spinning Without Cards.—Perhaps it is not known to all to whom it might be of service, that very good and even yarn may be spun from cotton just as it comes from the gin, as can be made from rolls.  This has been, and is now done very successfully, by people of more ingenuity and industry than those who are continually grumbling about the prices of cards.—Macon Mess.
   

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 2, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
                                                                               
[From the Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel.]

Cheering News from Arkansas.

                We have had the pleasure of an interview with a gentleman recently from Camden, Ark., who has kindly furnished us with some facts in regard to the situation of affairs in that State, which cannot fail to be of great interest to our readers.  Our informant is a gentleman of rare cultivation, strong good sense, and pleasing conversational powers, and his knowledge of affairs in that quarter is ample and reliable.
               
The social condition of the people of Arkansas is most encouraging.  The war has proved to them a blessing, in the sense that it has brought out the resources of the country, taught the inhabitants self reliance, and developed their slumbering energies.  In the enterprise and activity, born of the emergency, the State has become a perfect hive of industry.  Factories, machine shops, forges, foundries, etc., abound, where articles for home use, and for the use of the army, are abundantly supplied.  Salt wells have been found, and the manufacture of salt is carried on extensively and successfully.  The tanning of hides, for the past eighteen months, has been beyond all parallel in the history of the State.  By precaution and foresight, cotton and woolen cards are plenty, and many families are engaged in carding, spinning and weaving cloth, both for domestic purposes and for clothing the soldiers.  Our informant mentioned some households where eight hundred yards had been wove the past year, who intended this year to increase the amount to one thousand yards. Under the quickening influence of the time, the whole State is alive with industrial enterprise. . .  

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 2, 1863, p. 3, c. 4

From the Augusta Chronicle, 28th.
Cheering from Arkansas.

                We have had the pleasure of an interview with a gentleman recently from Camden, Arkansas, who has kindly furnished us with some facts in regard to the situation of affairs in that State, which cannot fail to be of great interest to our readers.  Our informant is a gentleman of rare cultivation, strong good sense, and pleasing conversational powers, and his knowledge of affairs in that quarter is ample and reliable.
               
The social condition of the people of Arkansas is most encouraging.  The war has proved to them a blessing, in the sense that it has brought out the resources of the country, taught the inhabitants self-reliance, and developed their slumbering energies.  In the enterprise and activity, born of the emergency, the State has become a perfect hive of industry.—Factories, machine shops, forges, foundries, etc., abound, where articles for home use, and for the army, are abundantly supplied.  Salt wells have been found and the manufacture of salt is carried on extensively and successfully.  The tanning of hides, for the past eight months, has been beyond all parallel in the history of the State.  By precaution and a wise foresight, cotton and woolen cards are plenty, and many families are engaged in carding, spinning, and weaving cloth, both for domestic purposes and for clothing the soldiers.  Our informant mentioned some households where eight hundred yards had been wove the past year, who intended this year to increase the amount to one thousand yards.  Under the quickening influence of the times, the whole State is alive with industrial enterprise. . .
   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, June 3, 1863, p. 3, c. 7

500 Pair
Whittemore Cotton Cards No. 10.

. . . And other articles too numerous to mention at                            
                Clarke & Co.,                        
                No. 82 Court street.
Call soon as they will be sold to the trade at a bargain. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, June 3, 1863, p. 3, c. 7

Cotton Cards.

800 Just received and for sale at                      
                Meyer & Meyer.  

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, June 6, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

For Sale.

                I offer for sale my Saw and Grist Mill, and one or two wool carding machines, together with 2,056 acres of land, and all tools and apperatus [sic] belonging to said machinery, also 75 head of hogs, and a small lot of cattle.  This property is situated in Wood county, 16 miles east fro Quitman.  Said machinery is propelled by never-failing water power.  For further particulars, address the undersigned at Calloway, Upshur Co., Texas.                                                             O. Hendrick.  
June 6, 1863.  

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 6, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Wool Cards,
Cotton Cards,
Mosquito Netting,
For sale by

                                                                                                                N. Lyon. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, June 10, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

A Noble Woman

                We have before us a letter written by a lady of this State to her husband, who is now in prison for the grave offense of taking up arms against his own State.  This noble woman writes in the kindest spirit, giving the health of the family and connexion, and says she hopes her letter may find him well.
She writes:  "I have received your letter this minute and am glad to hear that you are well, but I am sorry of the way you have done.     
                "All of my brothers are in the southern army.  Ma says you ought to be ashamed of the way you have acted—you have been fighting against your wife and children, and Pa and Ma and sisters, and your country.  I want to know whether you intend to join the Southern army or not.  If you want to live with me and the children any more you must join the Southern army, for I never intend to go to the North.  _____ is very smart, she is now carding—she says she don't want the Yankees to get her.  The babe is growing very fast and can walk.  I must say my home is in the South, and in the South I intend to stay.  Write soon.               
                I remain your wife till death,                    
                __________      
[Atlanta Confederacy.] 

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, June 13, 1863, p. 2. c. 7

Cotton Cards.

A fine lot for sale by                                           A. Loeb.  
June 13, 1863.  

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 16, 1863, p. 3, c. 4.

Correspondence of the Atlanta Intelligencer.
Food and Raiment.

                Dear Sir:  You have kindly allowed me the use of your columns heretofore, to treat on divers subjects bearing, as I thought, materially upon the public weal; I now desire to say something which may be of advantage on the subjects of food and raiment. . .
               
As to raiment—my own wardrobe (always very scant) is to the patch, pretty threadbare and very little on hand, but never did I feel more defiant than now.—We shall find out after a little, that it is not in the Yankees we have to "live, move and have our being;" we shall be forced to live without them, and no tear on that account shall ever bedew my cheek.  I want to live without them, and my children after me to the latest generation.—They have drenched in tears and blood, and filled with woe and wailing, the fairest land and the most prosperous and happy people on the globe.  I have no fellowship—I want none, for such a people.  But this is a digression.  My subject is raiment.  This we can make—we can grow wool, raise flax, and raise cotton, and all these we can spin into thread without carding.  Let no one be startled at this.  It has been done, and having been done, can be accomplished again.—Cards were invented long after clothes were made.  Our good women will fine this out after a little, and this they will do.  Through great privations and labor, they have already been the active agents, the main instruments, in clothing our armies, and, cards or no cards, they will clothe their children.  A good thread can be made from cotton on the common spinning wheel without carding.  It takes, however, two to do it, one to turn the wheel, and the other to draw and properly adjust the lint.  But this is too slow a process—the "flax wheel" of olden times is the machine to make thread with without carding.  My mother spun on one when I was a boy.  The operator sits on a chair and works a treddle with her feet, which puts the whole machine in motion.  She uses both hands in adjusting the lint, and drawing and twisting the thread ready for use.  The whole machine used to cost about three dollars.  Some of them are kept as a sort of family "heir loom," and can be easily duplicated—will some one do it?  If good warp cannot be made n this way, good filling can, and that constitutes one half of cloth after it is made.  If our blockade runners would bring cotton spinning machinery from England instead of fancy articles, it would be of much more advantage to the country.  I trust this will be done.
               
Respectfully,                                                                                         John W. Lewis.
   

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, June 27, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
               
Curtis, the cotton card speculator and Baxter the traitor, have been captured and carried back to Arkansas for trial.  The former says he went into the business in good faith, but after embarking, was informed that it was a swindle and agreed to aid in carrying it out.  The latter says though he joined the Arkansas renegades, he did not take up arms against the Confederates; that he was offered the position of Lieutenant Colonel in the Federal army but refused, and accepted a clerkship in some department and went off with them.  It is to be hoped they will reap their reward.   

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, July 1, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

Cotton Card Factory.

                                                                                                Office of Alabama State Card        }          
                                                                                                Manufacturing Company,               }             
                                                                                                Selma, Ala., March 18, 1863.      
                The undersigned has this day formed a co-partnership with the State of Alabama for the manufacture of Cotton and Wool Cards.    
                We are now ready to exchange Cotton Cards at $8 per pair, and Wool Cards at $6 per pair, for Sheep, Goat, Mule, Horse, Hog, Dog and Deer Skins, in large or small quantities, tanned or untanned, for which we will pay a liberal price in Cards or Cash.     
                In the course of a few months we expect to be turning out from one thousand to fifteen hundred pair of Cards per week, which will require large quantities of the above named skins, which we must have, and trust that every one will interest himself in behalf of this important enterprise, and help us to obtain them.     
                Skins tanned for Cards should be firm and pliable, like calfskin; they should not be stiff or spongy, should be as free from wrinkles as possible and smooth upon the grain side.  We will receive them at their value in any condition.     
                All communications addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt attention.                              
                                                                                                J. M. Keep, Superintendent,
ap23d&w3m                                                                                                                          Selma Ala.  

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, July 11, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Wanted.

                The undersigned wishes to employ a good wool carder, to run and manage two wool carding machines at his mill in Wood county, to whom good wages will be given.  Any one wishing to get employment in that business can address him at Calloway, Upshur co., or come immediately to said mill, as I am anxious to get some one soon.                                                    O. Hendrick.  
July 11, 1863.  

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, July 14, 1863, p.3, c. 8

New Cards
At One Dollar!!
Old Cards Repaired
At One Dollar
By Thos. J. Whitly,
Huntsville, Alabama.

                                                No Teeth put in.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, July 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Circular Address
To the People of Alabama.

                                                                                                Montgomery, July 13th, 1863.

Cotton and Wool Cards.

                During the past year and prior to the meeting of the legislature, I succeeded in obtaining 960 pairs of cotton cards which were distributed to soldiers' families at $7 and $7.50 per pair.  The legislature when it met authorized me to risk shipments through the blockade.  I immediately purchased sterling exchange, and at prices, four hundred per cent. below the present rates, and ordered cotton and wool cards from Nassau.  There were four different shipments, amounting to 5,876 pairs, all of which arrived safely, and have been distributed according to population, to the various counties for soldiers' families at prices varying from $3.50 to $9 per pair.  It will thus be seen that the State has supplied to the families of her soldiers 6836 pairs of cards at prime cost, when the same articles were being sold by speculators at $15 to $25 dollars [sic] per pair.  For a future supply I have made such arrangements as reasonably promise after the first of September to furnish from four to five hundred pairs weekly for distribution to the State.

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, July 15, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
               
A New Idea.—Cotton Cards.—We are informed that there is a farmer in Washington county who spins his cotton filling without the aid of cards.  The process is simple.  He goes to the ginhouse or lint room, put the light flakes of cotton ginned into a basket, not packed, carries it to the spinning wheel, and the thread is made with rapidity.  With a little practice, more thread can be made in a day than with the aid of cotton cards.  If kerseys are desired to be made, put cow hair into the gin with seed cotton, and it will be thrown into the lint room nicely mixed.  The same process as above, will give him the filling he desires.  Will our farmers practice upon the important idea thrown out?—Milledgeville Recorder.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, July 29, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Cotton Cards, Cotton Cards,

288 Pair the very best Cotton Cards, No. 10's,
6 dozen English Lanterns, very fine.
Just received and for sale by                                             Lovell & Lattimore.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, July 29, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Cotton Cards, Nails, &c.

500 Pair Cotton Cards, No. 10, best quality . .
                                                                                               
Geo. Patten.   

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, August 20, 1863, p. 1, c. 5 
                Mr. H. P. Livingston, of Clinch county, has distributed two hundred and twenty-five pairs of cotton cards to the mothers, wives and widows of the soldiers in service from this county.  His donations to the soldiers and their families in this county, since the war commenced, have amounted to over thirty thousand dollars. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, September 8, 1863, p. 3, c. 3

Florida Card Factory.

                We have recently examined a pair of wool cards turned out by the card factory established at this place by the Governor, assisted by other patriotic citizens.  We were pleased, proud and surprised at the perfection of workmanship exhibited in the specimen before us.  They are equal, if not superior, to the same article formerly obtained from our Yankee "friends."  We are informed that the factory will be prepared to turn out a large supply of this indispensible article as soon as suitable skins can be obtained.  Surely our citizens will not let so patriotic an enterprise suffer for want of skins.  We are informed that this factory can furnish cards cheaper than any other establishment in the Confederacy.—Floridian.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, September 8, 1863, p. 3, c. 4       
                Florida Card Factory.—We have recently examined a pair of wool cards turned out by the card factory establishment at this place by the Governor, assisted by other patriotic citizens.  We were pleased, proud and surprised at the perfection of workmanship exhibited in the specimen before us.  They are equal, if not superior, to the same article formerly obtained from our Yankee "friends."  We are informed that the factory will be prepared to turn out a large supply of this indispensable article as soon as suitable skins can be obtained.  Surely our citizens will not let so patriotic an enterprise suffer for want of skins.  We are informed that this factory can furnish cards cheaper than any other establishment in the Confederacy.—Floridian.  

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, September 17, 1863, p. 2, c. 4       
                Florida Card Factory.—We have recently examined a pair of wool cards turned out by the card factory establishment at this place by the Governor, assisted by other patriotic citizens.  We were pleased, proud and surprised at the perfection of workmanship exhibited in the specimen before us.          
                They are equal, if not superior, to the same article formerly obtained from our Yankee "friends."  We are informed that the factory will be prepared to turn out a large supply of this indispensable article as soon as suitable skins can be obtained.  Surely our citizens will not let so patriotic an enterprise suffer for want of skins.  We are informed that this factory can furnish cards cheaper than any other establishment in the Confederacy.—Floridian. 

THE DAILY INTELLIGENCER [ATLANTA, GA], September 23, 1863, p. 1, c. 5

Wool!  Wool!

Wool carded into rolls at Hat Factory of J. M. Holbrook.
Atlanta, Sept. 17.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, October 7, 1863, p. 2, c. 7

Cotton and Wool Cards for Socks.

                                                                                                            Office of Clothing Bureau   }
                                                                                          
                  Mil. Dist. Texas, &c.         }
                                                                                                            
Houston, Sept. 24th, 1863.}
               
Any person delivering twenty-five pairs of homemade Socks, strong and well made, to Capt. W. J. Mills, A. Q. M., in charge of the Clothing Depot, at Houston, will receive one pair of cotton or wool Cards, at their option.
                                                                                                               
E. C. Wharton,
                                                                                                     
Major & Q. M. Chief of Bureau. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, October 14, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
               
It would seem from an article in this morning's Telegraph that the offer made by Maj. Wharton of one pair of cards for 25 pair of soldier's socks was not understood to be a fair remuneration for the socks, but was all Maj. W. was authorized to offer, as the government price for the cards is $25, and for the socks $1 a pair.  It appears that 100,000 pair of socks are now wanted for our soldiers to prevent them from suffering during the approaching winter, and Maj. W. is doing all the regulations allow him to do to supply that want.  It cannot of course be expected that poor families will undertake to knit socks for so inadequate a remuneration, but the deficiency ought to be supplied by those who are able, while ladies who are able to do it may knit socks for the offer made or without any remuneration, or may put their negro servants to knitting for the soldiers so as to save them from suffering.  If all the women in Texas would apply themselves to supplying this important want, our soldiers would be comfortably supplied in less time than we are talking about it.
   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, October 14, 1863, p. 3, c. 7

Wanted.  
Sheep Skins Wanted for Cotton Cards.

                Market price will be paid in Cotton Cards, for tanned or raw Sheep and Goat Skins, tanned preferred.  Address or apply to                                                                            J. C. Davis,                    
                Montgomery, Ala.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, October 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 5 
                A card factory has been established near Tallahassee, Fla., which will furnish cards cheaper than any other in the Confederacy.  It is in want of skins. 

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], October 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 1

Cotton Cards.

                We are authorized by a citizen of Clark county, to say that he will be one of ten or twenty, or any number of persons, more than ten, to contribute one hundred dollars each for the purpose of purchasing cotton cards for destitute families of this county.  Those wishing to enter into this arrangement can report their names at this office.  Money cannot be expended in a better manner for the relief of the poor, and it is to be hoped that the proposition will meet with a hearty response.   

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, October 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
Cotton Cards for the counties--The State Military Board have received from Europe thirty thousand pairs of cotton cards, to be distributed among the counties on the basis of the scholastic census, at $10 per pair in currency, payable at Austin on delivery.  The needy families of soldiers are to have the preference, and the balance are to be under the control of the County Courts, to their best judgment for the public good.  In no case are the cards to be sold at a higher price than cost and carriage.  Applications from the several counties are to be made within 60 days, or they will be considered as declining the offer of the Board.  Orders must be addressed to P. De Cordova, Secretary of the Military Board, Austin. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
Cotton Cards.—The State Gazette says the State has now thirty thousand pairs of cotton cards for distribution pro rata among the several counties of the State, according to their scholastic population.—The needy families of soldiers are to have the preference, the balance to be under the care of the County Courts.  The price is $10 per pair, to cover cost and carriage.  They were imported from Europe by Messrs. Ball, Hutchings & Co., of this city, for the State Military Board.  The above price as compared with that usually charged, will enable our readers to form some estimate of the usual profits.
               
The County Courts should lose no time in sending in their applications with the money.  They will supply a pressing want in the State, and, if distributed promptly, may be in time to enable our people to provide clothing before the severe cold weather sets in.  If the application is not made in sixty days, the counties will be considered as declining the offer.  Orders must be addressed to P. DeCordova, Secretary at the Military Board.  The Gazette understands that the number of the cards is more than sufficient for Texas, and that the Board can furnish a large supply to other states. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 10, 1863, p. 4, c. 3
               
Cotton Cards.—The Richmond Sentinel says:
               
We have seen a specimen of Cotton Cards (No. 10) manufactured by Hargrove, Penick & Co., at Pittsylvania Court House, Va.  These cards are equal in appearance, and we have no doubt in material, workmanship, and value, to any of the imported or Northern manufacture; and, we are pleased to learn, are meeting with a ready sale, as rapidly as they can be made.
               
The machinery—a very complicated invention for manufacturing these cards—was constructed by a gentleman of experience in the business, at the works in Pittsylvania; and the same gentleman is erecting machinery for making filletting, sheeting, &c.  He also contemplates the manufacture of Cotton and Wool Cards for mill machines.  Such a manufactory in our midst, at this time, will prove of great benefit to the Southern people.
   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, November 11, 1863, p. 2, c. 1-7

Governor's Message.

                                                Executive Department,                      
                Montgomery, Ala., Nov. 9th, 1863. . . .

Spinning Cards.

                The General Assembly, by an act approved Nov. 8th, 1862, appropriated $60,000 for the purchase of spinning cards.—This appropriation fell short of the necessities of the State.  At the date of the Act spinning cards were selling in our markets at from ten to fifteen dollars per pair, and at the lowest price the sum appropriated would have furnished only six thousand pairs.  None, however, could be purchased in the Confederacy, and they had to be ordered from abroad.  Immediately upon the passage of the Act I invested $56,400 [unclear] in sterling exchange, as authorized by the act and remitted an order to Nassau through the well known house of John Fraser & Co. of Charleston.  During the ensuing Spring, and after many delays, I received, by four separate shipments into Charleston and Wilmington, 5,866 [or 5,868] pairs of cotton and wool cards.  In the meantime engagements were made with several other parties for deliveries in the State of such additional quantities as would probably cover the balance of the appropriation, to be paid for on delivery, but these engagements were not complied with by the parties making them.        
                The cards imported from Nassau were delivered to the Secretary of State, and by him distributed to the Probate Judges of the several counties, in proportion to population, to be sold at prices varying from $3.50 to $5 [unclear] per pair, to cover cost and charges, as the law directs.           
                Copies of correspondence and invoices, and of contracts made, and of the report of the Secretary of State, are herewith communicated.    
                In the month of March last I purchased of J. M. Keep, of Selma, on behalf of the State, a half interest in a card machine invented and constructed by himself, and contracted for the manufacture of additional machines to operate on joint account with the State.  With ordinary facilities a half dozen machines could have been finished and put in operation several months since, but the unavoidable hindrances which have attended their construction have greatly retarded their completion.  One machine for the manufacture of wool cards and two for cotton are finished, another will be ready in a fortnight, and three others are far advanced towards completion.  Machinery and plates have also been constructed for drawing the wire, and a large quantity of suitable hides and other material has been accumulated, sufficient to manufacture ten or twelve thousand pairs of cards.  A suitable engine has also been provided to drive all the machinery for the drawing of the wire, setting the teeth and making the wooden backs by steam power.  Over nine hundred pairs of cards have been made in the establishment by hand power.  These have been exchanged and bartered for hides and other materials needed.  So soon as the half dozen machines are finished and put in operation, it is confidently believed that the establishment will turn out from seven to nine hundred pairs of cards per week.  A sample of the cards, just received from the factory, is submitted for your inspection.  I also submit a copy of the contract made with Mr. Keep, a copy of a report filed in the Executive office by Dr. Charles Lucas, whom I deputed recently to visit and examine the factory, which explains more fully the condition and prospects of this establishment.  Dr. Lucas closes his report by saying, "I regard the enterprise as a perfect success, and believe that it will shortly contribute largely to the relief of the people of Alabama who are so severely suffering for the want of cotton and wool cards."  I was not authorised by the act of Nov. 8th, 1862, to make this investment on behalf of the State, but seeing the inadequacy of the appropriation made by the act to furnish the State with cards, and also observing the rapid advance of foreign exchange, and the increasing difficulties, at greatly increased cost, of transportation through the blockade, I deemed it a matter of prime importance to secure a permanent establishment within the State of a card factory, which, with every necessary material at hand, would render the State independent of foreign markets, and furnish cards to the people at a price several hundred per cent. cheaper than they could be otherwise obtained.  I trust that the engagements made in behalf of the State may be ratined [ratified?] and confirmed by the General Assembly. . . .                      
                                                                                                                                                                Jno. Gill Shorter.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, November 18, 1863, p. 2, c. 4

How to Spin Cotton Yarns Without Cards.

                Gov. Shorter has received the following communication on this subject from Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, the Senator from Greene and Marengo, which we publish for the valuable information it contains.  A specimen of the yarn can bee seen at the Executive office:                    
                                                                                Capitol, Nov. 12, 1863.  
                His Excellency, John Gill Shorter.          
                Dear Sir—A constituent of mine, Col. R. R. Pickering, of Marengo county, is making excellent cotton yarns, for the manufacture of bagging and heavy clothing for negroes, without the use of cards.  He gins the cotton slowly, so as to throw large flakes through the flue, which are caught in a hamper basket placed under the flue, and taken to the spinning wheel, without pressing the cotton.  Col. Pickering informs me that his best spinners average eight cuts per day.  Since he made this discovery he has abandoned the use of cards, in making coarse yarns.  I herewith send you a specimen of the yarn for exhibition.             
                Believing this a matter of much importance to our country, I have taken the liberty of making this communication.   
                Very respectfully,                         
                Yours, &c.,                                                         W. E. Clarke.  

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, November 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 2
               
The Military  Board.—This Board appears to have rendered valuable service to the country, but has met with acts of bad faith on the part of some of its agents.  We trust the report will fully expose them to the public.  Since the adjournment of the last Legislature, the Board has distributed 12,000 pairs of cotton and wool cards, at a cost to the people of $10 per pair for the former and $4 for the latter, while the ruling price in the market has been for the former from $25 to $40, the saving to the people on this article alone having been over one million of dollars. . . .
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 19, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

How to Spin Cotton Yarns without Cards.

                Go. Shorter has received the following communication on this subject from Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, the Senator from [illegible] and Marengo, which we publish for the valuable information it contains.  A specimen of the yarn can be seen at the Executive office.
                                                                                                               
Capitol, No. 12, 1863.
His Excellency John Gill Shorter,
               
Dear sir—A constituent of mine, Col. R. R. Pickering, of Marengo county, is making excellent cotton yarns, for the manufacture of bagging and heavy clothing for negroes, without the use of cards.  He gins the cotton slowly, so as to throw large flakes through the flue, which are caught in a hamper basket placed under the flue, and taken to the spinning wheel, without pressing the cotton.  Col. Pickering informs me that his best spinners average eight cuts per day.  Since he made this discovery, he has abandoned the use of cards in making coarse yarns.  I share with you a specimen of the yarn for exhibition.
               
Believing this a matter of much importance to our country, I have taken the liberty of making this communication.
                                                                                               
Very respectfully,
                                                                                                               
Yours, &c.,
                                                                                                                               
W. E. Clarke.
Montgomery Advertiser. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, November 24, 1863, p. 3, c. 6

Cotton Yarns Without Cards.

                Gov. Shorter has received the following communication on the subject from Hon. Wm. E. Clarke, the Senator from Greene and Marengo, which we publish for the valuable information it contains.  A specimen of the yarn can be seen at the Executive office:--Montg. Adv.
                                                                                                               
Capitol, Nov. 12, 1863.
His Excellency, John Gill Shorter:
               
Dear Sir—A constituent of mine, Col. R. R. Pickering, of Marengo county, is making excellent cotton yarns, for the manufacture of bagging and heavy clothing for negroes, without the use of cards.  he gins the cotton slowly, so as to throw large flakes through the flue, which are caught in a hamper basket placed under the flue, and taken to the spinning wheel, without pressing the cotton.  Col. Pickering informs me that his best spinners average eight cuts per day.  Since he made this discovery he has abandoned the use of cards in making coarse yarns.  I herewith send you a specimen of the yarn for examination.
               
Believing this a matter of much importance to our country, I have taken the liberty of making this communication.
                                                                                               
Very respectfully,
                                                                                                               
Yours, &c.,
                                                                                                                               
W. E.  Clarke.
   

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], November 24, 1863, p. 1, c. 8
[Correspondence Mobile Evening News]

  
              Houston, Texas, . . . November 12. . .
  
              P.S.  Large importations of cotton cards have found their way into Texas, and are now sold at a price which place them within reach of all.
  
              The loom and spinning wheel are now found in almost every house, and the busy hum may be heard continually throughout the earth and breadth of the State.  An abundance of material for soldiers' clothing is now manufactured "at home," and even if the coming winter be severe, but few if any will suffer for the want of comfortable apparel.  With plenty to eat and plenty to wear, we are in fine spirits and eagerly watch for the threatening foe.  When he comes, he will not find us unprepared to receive him. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
               
Repairing Cotton Cards.—Owners of cotton and woolen cards will find something of interest to them in the card of Mr. Sutton, which appears in this paper.  We have witnessed his operation of re-setting the teeth of cards which have become useless, and it is certain that they were made to do very good carding.  Our only doubt was as regards the durability of the repairs, but he is willing to guarantee his work for a twelvemonth, which, we believe, is almost as long as a new pair of cards will last.
               
The plan of Mr. Sutton is extremely simple, and was invented by Rev. James Palen, of Bartow, Jefferson county, whilst Mr. S. Z. Murphey, of the same place, is owner of the right for the greater portion of Georgia and South Carolina, Mr. Sutton being agent of the latter.
               
The very high price of cards makes this discovery a very important one, especially to the poor, whose cards are repaired at a very low price.  We direct attention to the advertisement of Mr. Sutton. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Cotton and Woolen Cards.

                I will reset the teeth of Cotton and Woolen Cards so as to do good carding.  If left at my residence, corner of Bull and Chariton streets, I am at home every other week from the country, in which I travel to repair cards.                                                                                Francis Sutton.   

WASHINGTON [AR] TELEGRAPH, November 25, 1863
Cotton Cards for Sale.  Cards for sale at the Government Clothing Rooms.  Linsey, Jeans and Socks taken in exchange at fair prices.  If sold for money, the price thirty-five ($35) dollars per pair.  Apply to Maj. J. D. Adams, Q.M.C.S.A.  Washington, Nov. 25, 1863. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 22, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
The Georgia penitentiary has wire enough for two years, and will turn out about two hundred pairs of cotton cards daily.
   

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], December 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 4

The Box Full and the Bottom Falling Out.

From the Macon (Ga.) Telegraph.]
    
           An intelligent friend (no trader or speculator) just from the beautiful city of Augusta, says that town is filled to repletion with blockade goods of every description.  It is his opinion that in the palmiest days of peace and plenty, she could never have boasted of a tithe of the amount of merchandise which now crowds every warehouse, waiting anxiously, but, as he thinks, hopelessly, for a market at the exorbitant rates which have hitherto prevailed.  He saw cotton cards enough in one pile to put a pair into the hands of every woman in Georgia--wool hats apparently by the million--worsteds in endless quantities; stockings and ladies' shoes, enough apparently to fit out all the dear creatures south of Mason and Dixon's line.  The accumulations are enormous, and sales increasingly difficult, for holders have not yet made up their minds to submit to concessions, and accordingly spend day after day in the interesting employment of bidding in their own goods, which they consider more safe than profitable.                                                                                                                                               Committee.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, January 6, 1864, p. 2, c. 2

Home Industry.

                As the time is at hand when families are making their plans and preparations for the ensuing year, we deem it appropriate to offer a suggestion.  Much more than heretofore should housekeepers and farmers make their arrangements for meeting all their wants by home industry and enterprise. . . .      
                A hundred reasons combine to urge upon every family to look to its own resources.  The hand card and the hand loom and the spinning wheel, whose music is sweeter far than that of the piano, should be found everywhere.  All who can should grow their patches of flax and cotton.  All should have sheep, if but a few.  Our forest furnish dyes as various and as bright as the tints that make their foliage so glorious at "the turn of the leaf."  With these materials, there is no reason why our ladies should not be clad in beautiful apparel, the product of their own industry and taste, while they may clothe their husbands and sons fine enough for kings.  There is not a farmer's wife who may not easily provide for all her servants, and make some to sell besides.         
                And how much more independent and happy should we all be if thus providing for ourselves.  A fig for blockaders, we might well exclaim; nor would be any longer exposed to the extortioner's grip.  And those eventualities of the future in which we have alluded would bring no terror to us.  Earnestly, therefore, do we advise every one to use every means and make every arrangement in his power to provide for the clothing of his family from his own resources, and thus make himself independent of manufacturers and blockade runners.—Richmond Sentinel.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, January 13, 1864, p. 2, c. 7

Home Resources.

                The good of our country, the advancement of our cause, the comfort of our brave defenders in the field, self-interest—in fact a hundred reasons, says the Augusta Chronicle & Sentinel, combine to urge upon every family to look to its own resources.  The hand card and the hand loom, and the spinning wheel should be found every where—in every family.  All who can, should grow their patches of flax and cotton.  All who can should have sheep, if but a few.  Our forests furnish dyes as various and as bright as the tints that make their foliage as glorious at "the turn of the leaf."  With these materials, there is no reason why our ladies should not be clad in beautiful apparel, the product of their own industry and taste; while they also may clothe their husbands and sons.  There is not a planter's wife who may not easily provide clothing for all her servants, and make some to sell besides.  Ladies in the cities also can do much towards providing cheap and substantial clothing for their families, if they only had the mind so to do.  Where there is a will, there is generally a way.  A little energy, a little determination, a little effort put forth in the right direction by ladies who do nothing, would accomplish a great deal.             
                How much more independent and happy we should all be if we thus provided for ourselves as we ought to.  Much more now, than heretofore, should all housekeepers and heads of families make their arrangements for meeting all their wants by home industry and enterprise.  Earnestly, therefore, do we advise all to use every means in their power to provide for themselves and their families from their own resources.  

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, January 13, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
               
How to Spin Cotton Yarns Without Cards.—Gov. Shorter, of Alabama, received
the following communication on the above subject, from Hon. W. E. Clarke, Senator in the Alabama Legislature.  The Montgomery Advertiser publishes it for the valuable information it contains:
                                                                                               
Capitol, Nov. 12, 1863.
His Excellency, John Gill Shorter—
               
Dear Sir:--A constituent of mine, Col. R. R. Pickering, of Marengo county, is making excellent cotton yarns, for the manufacture of bagging and heavy clothing for negroes, without the use of cards.  He gins the cotton slowly, so as to throw large flakes through the flue, which are caught in a hamper basket placed under the flue, and taken to the spinning wheel, without pressing the cotton.  Col. Pickering informs me that his best spinners average eight cuts per day.  Since he made this discovery he has abandoned the use of cards, in making coarse yarns.  I herewith send you a specimen of the yarn for exhibition.
               
Believing this a matter of much importance to our country, I have taken the liberty of making this communication.
   

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], February 4, 1864, p. 3, c. 4
Cotton Cards.--Another set of English cards, for sale by
Feb. 3                                                                                                                     I.M. Kenney.
   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, February 4, 1864, p. 2, c. 4

New Goods.

                We are receiving the following Goods:  . . . Cotton Cards, . . . ; all of which will be sold as low as the present high prices will justify.  Persons purchasing liquid medicines must furnish Bottles or Vials.                     
                                                                                                                Burge & Daffin.   
Grove Hill, Feb. 2. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], February 6, 1864, p. 2. c. 1

Cotton Cards.

                The Milledgeville Recorder understands that the increased number of machines constructed in the penitentiary for the manufacture of cotton cards will do much toward supplying a great public need, and that cards may now be had at the sale room at the old price of six dollars a pair, half in skins and the other half in money.  This is a change of the former rule, which required the whole price to be paid in skins.  The Savannah Republican, for the benefit of those desiring cards on these terms, (and in no other way can they be obtained at the penitentiary,) states the quantity of skins, and the price, to buy a pair of cards to be as follows:  For sheep, goat, dog or deer skins, raw, the price allowed is twenty-five cents for 22 inches in length and five inches in width; and for tanned skins of the same description, the sum is fifty cents.  The skins must be sound, and without holes.  It will take from two to three skins, according to size, to bring three dollars in exchange; the other three dollars will be received in money for a pair of cards, under the present regulation.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, February 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 5 
                Gen. Duff C. Green has left with the Eutaw (Ala.) Whig a sample of thread spun from the flakes of cotton without the usual process of carding.  The specimen is equal to any coarse thread made from the carded roll, and for making coarse cloth will answer the same purpose.  If once tried by our farmers, we think they will be induced to abandon cards entirely in the manufacture of negro clothing.  The following is the modus operandi of preparing the cotton:  "Gin the cotton slowly, so as to throw large flakes through the flue, which are caught in a hamper basket placed under the flue, and take to the spinning wheel, without pressing the cotton."  

CHARLESTON MERCURY, February 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 3

The Spinning Jenny.

                                                                                                                North Santee, January 28.
               
To the Editor of the Mercury:  Is it not a matter of surprise that, although the scarcity and high price of cloth has been one of the most important evils inflicted upon us by the blockade, we have failed to make use of a remedy entirely within our reach?  I allude to the spinning jenny, invented by Hargreaves, nearly a century ago.--Almost two years since, learning that one of these machines was in the neighborhood, I thought it worth while to pay it a visit of inspection.  I found it quite simple in construction, and such as any good carpenter could make, excepting the spindles of iron or steel, and the metal steps in which they turn.  Its operation is easily understood, and with it a woman can spin a bunch of yarn, as I was informed by the owner of the one in question in one day, instead of a month--the time required to spin a bunch of five pounds with the single spinning wheel now in general use all over the country; or, to make the contrast still more striking, one woman, with the jenny, would spin as much in a year as she would in thirty yarns with the common wheel.  Further, with the spinning jenny in universal use, as much yarn would be spun in the Confederate States in a month as would require thirty months with the single wheel, excluding the factories.
               
The yarn can be spun of any fineness; and our experience since the commencement of the war teaches us that, by using coarse yarn, warm clothing can be manufactured of cotton as well as wool, although, of course, not quite equal to the latter material.
               
In the making of cloth from the raw material, the most tedious and discouraging of all the processes to be gone through, is the spinning of the yarn.  To obtain a bunch of 5 lbs., sufficient to make about 15 yards of cloth, it is required, day after day, and week after week, to continue drawing out the yarn yard upon yard, and mile upon mile in length, until a month is consumed.  In short, the operation would discourage any but the more patient nature of woman.  A good carder can card a pound of cotton per day.  A weaver can weave then yards of cloth; both operations being far less tedious than the spinning.  If then the jenny supplies this great want, is it not important that at this time it should be generally introduced throughout the country, when the procuring of them is in our power.  A few days since looking over some of the old numbers of the "Penny Magazine," I came across a description of Hargreaves' invention in the volume of 1836, and it agreed exactly with the machine I had seen, and several of them are scattered through the country.  The original cost of the one I saw was $9 (nine dollars); and before the war, when cotton yard could be bought at eighty cents to one dollar per bunch, it had sold for one dollar!
   

[LITTLE ROCK] NATIONAL DEMOCRAT, February 13, 1864, p. 4, c. 4

Important to the Ladies
Arrival of New Goods!!

                The undersigned have just received and offer for sale, at very low prices, a general assortment of staple and fancy Dry Goods, such as . . .     
Prints of the best fabric;    
Cotton Cards; . . .                  
Boys Boots and a great many articles too numerous to mention, therefore we invite you one and all to give us a call before purchasing elsewhere.                            
                                                Lindauer & Co.,                    
                                                Tucker's old Stand.             
Jan. 30, 1864.  

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, February 18, 1864, p. 2, c. 1 
                The Milledgeville Recorder understands that the increased number of machines constructed in the Georgia Penitentiary, for the manufacture of cotton cards, will do toward supplying a great public need, and the cards may now be had at the sale room at the old price of six dollars a pair, half in skins, and the other half in money. 

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, March 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 5     
                The State of North Carolina is distributing cotton cards among the families of soldiers at five dollars per pair.  Necessitous wives and mothers of soldiers have the preference. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, March 16, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
     
          The Military Board have received, within the past week, 16,000 pairs cotton cards, for the second distribution to counties which have not heretofore received their quota.  We are requested to state that the proper officers of counties, which have not been supplied, should immediately come forward and draw the quota to which each county is entitled.  No interference will be made, by impressment officers, with wagons in transit for the procurement of cotton cards.  Persons coming with proper authority from their counties must apply to the Adj't and inspector Gen'ls office.  Too much credit cannot be awarded to the Military Board for the benefits rendered to all the counties in the State, in furnishing this essential arm of service.
   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, March 23, 1864, p. 1, c. 4     
                Miss Tucker, of Weatherford, deserves to bear off the palm.  She has made with her own fair hands, a pair of cotton cards, and carded, spun, wove and made her own dresses. Who can beat that?—Texas Telegraph.

SELMA MORNING REPORTER, March 23, 1864, p. 2. c. 2

Nassau Market.   

            The Nassau Herald, in its commercial report of the 20th of February, says that business at that place has been more limited than at any period within the past two years—the restrictions to trade with the Northern States, and the new prohibitory laws enacted by the Confederate Congress, having had a depressing effect on trade.  A great desire was manifested by holders of liquors, cigars, &c., to secure shipment before the 1st of March, it being understood that after that date such articles will not be admitted into any Confederate port.  We copy the following portion of the prices current: . . .
            Cotton Cards.—Whitemore, No. 10, $12a$14; English, No. 10, $11a$12; Lea Cards, $6.50a$7. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, April 20, 1864, p. 4, c. 6

Cotton Cards.

                I have located myself at Haw Ridge, Ala., for the purpose of repairing Cotton Cards.  Having been at the business for the past two years, I am prepared to put new teeth in, and where the leathers are damaged I am prepared to put new leathers in.  I will be at Evergreen, Conecuh county, Ala., on the 5th April next, and will remain there until the 18th, where I will be prepared to repair as many as five pair per day.  I will also learn as many as two persons from each county in this State, of they desire to go into the business.  They will be prompt in meeting me at Evergreen, as above stated.  
                The scarcity of cotton cards makes it necessary that there should be at least two expert repairers in each county. 
                Persons desiring to learn the trade, can do so by paying me $500.  Where the money cannot be paid I will take stock at fair prices.  My charges for repairing is from $10 to $15, and all work warranted to give entire satisfaction.         
Haw Ridge, Ala.                                                   Eli Clark,                     
                                                mar6-4

[LITTLE ROCK] UNCONDITIONAL UNION, April 22, 1864, p. 2, c. 6

1864                                            1864
New Goods,
Latest Arrival from the North.
Attention!  Attention!!
Marshall & Saxton,
One door East of Fisher's old stand, on the corner
of Markham and Cumberland Streets.

Have just received a large and well selected stock of  . . .

Cotton Cards,
Wool Cards,
Dye Stuffs.

Copperas and Indigo,
                    Madder and Blue Stone. . . .
                                                                                                        Marshal & Saxton.
            April 22, 1864.

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], May 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 2
            The card factory at Selma, Ala., is running four machines, which turn off from twenty to fifty pairs per day.  The proprietor will soon commence manufacturing wire from common bar iron.  The cards will [sic] at $8 per pair.

THE SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], May 11, 1864, p. 4, c. 1-2

To Prepare Wool for Carding.

                At the present time, when wool is so much needed, it may be well to state a few facts, that are not known to all:
     
           1.  Wool sheared from sheep that are well kept is much the best.
    
           2.  When the shearing operation is to be performed, it should be done by a skillful, practiced hand, as wool that is cut up in shearing, always falls out of the cards and is lost.
     
           3.  The sooner wool is washed after shearing the better.  It should never be packed away in a close pile, and left to lie in that position, either washed or unwashed.
    
           4.  The washing operation is the most important of all.  A few years ago a premium was offered in one of the finest wool-growing regions in Kentucky, for the best mode of washing wool.  The lost of wool that took the premium was washed after the following manner:  It was thrown into a pot of boiling water, and kept well stirred just one minute by the watch.  It was then instantly thrown out into water milk warm and washed, and then passed through several tubs of water of common temperature, being washed all the while until it was thoroughly clean.  The writer has seen the thing tried, and it works that the wool does not remain in the boiling water longer than one minute, as it is in danger of being ruined.  The philosophy of this quick scalding is to soften the gum, which is on all raw wool, so that it will wash off easily.
    
           5.  When wool is washed it should be spread out thin at once to run, and kept stirred until it is thoroughly dried.  It should never be allowed to get wet after it is put out to dry.
    
           6.  Wool that has been dyed should have the dye stuff washed out thoroughly.  Wool should not be allowed to start to a carding machine, even in a damp condition.  It should be entirely dry.
    
           7.  When wool has been well handled in washing, it will have a glossy appearance in the sun, no matter what the color of the wool.
    
           8.  Some lots of wool will waste more than others in carding, and it is difficult to account for it.  But clean wool that has been well handled in the manner above directed, should in no case lose more than one pound in eight or nine, and generally about one pound to ten.
    
           9.  But lastly, where there are no pains taken to fix up wool properly for carding, the owner should not complain, whether the rolls be few, or of an inferior quality.  The wool should be lifted out of the boiling water with a fork made for the purpose with several prongs.
   

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 13, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
               
The card factory at Selma, Ala., is running four machines, which turn off from twenty to fifty pair per day.  The proprietor will soon commence manufacturing wire from common bar iron.  The cards will sell at $8 per pair.
   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, May 19, 1864, p. 1, c. 5

Just Received.

                Cotton Cards, Factory Thread, . . .

                                                                                                                Burge & Daffin.   
May 18, 1864. 

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, May 25, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

Blockade Profits.

                We hear it frequently asserted that there is no profit upon cargoes brought in and sold here, and that the only profit is on the outward cargo.  Let us look at a few things where we have a chance of comparing the Nassau prices with those obtained here yesterday at auction.  We take the Nassau quotations from the Bahama Herald of the 4th: . . .            
                Cotton Cards—Nassau, Whittemore, No. 10, $13 to $14 per dozen.  English, No. 10, $11a$12; Wilmington, $36 to $60 per pair--$36 to $60 for $2 . . .            
                Sulph. Quinine—Nassau, $2.25 per oz; Wilmington, $59a$80 per oz.--$25 to 36 ½ for $1 . . .          
Now here is an average of $56 for $1, that is to say two hundred per cent on Nassau prices, allowing for exchange the full current rates, and all the articles we have quoted are, we are pretty sure, included among the articles not prohibited.  It will not do to say that at these prices goods will not be brought in, or that the profits are not sufficiently remunerative to tempt capitalists to take the risk.  The venture is a paying one both ways, and would be so were prices lowered one half.—Wilmington Journal.  

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 6, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
Little steps towards Southern independence.--The following list of manufactories of general utility, not heretofore made in the South, is copied from exchanges within the past few days, says the Charlotte Bulletin.  It shows that our people are really making some progress towards the independence that we have heard talked of so much.  We have not included the cotton and woollen mills dotted here and there in all the States, or the iron establishments, or the Government works for making arms, powder, etc.
               
We have not doubt there are many other establishments of which we have seen no notice, that are adding to the resources of the country, by making articles that we have heretofore depended upon the Yankees to furnish us: . . .
               
Cotton Card Factory at Greenwood, S. C.
               
Cotton Card Factory at Fayetteville, N. C.
               
Cotton Card Factory at Columbus, Ga.
               
Cotton Card Factory at Danville, Va., 2.
               
Cotton Card Factory at Selma, Ala. . . .    

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 17, 1864, p. 2, c. 5

English Wool
Cards,
Just Received, at
Aimar's Drug Store.

June 17      

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, July 4, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
               
A New Idea.—Cotton Cards.—We are informed that there is a farmer in Washington county, who spins his cotton filling without the aid of cards.  The process is simple.  He goes to the ginhouse or lint room, puts the light flakes of cotton ginned into a basket, not packed, carries it to the spinning wheel, and the tread is made with rapidity.  With a little practice, more thread can be made in a day than with the aid of cotton cards.  If kerseys are desired to be made put cow hair into the gin with seed cotton, and it will be thrown into the lint room nicely mixed.  The same process as above, will give him the filling he desires.  Will our farmers practice upon the important idea thrown out?—Milledgeville Recorder.
               
The expense of trying the above idea will not be much and in these days, with cotton cards at present prices, it might prove of great convenience.    

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, July 28, 1864, p. 3, c. 3
Salt, Cotton Cards, Calico, 4-4 Sheeting, Osnaburgs and Cotton Yarns, in exchange for Country Produce.  We will give one pair of Whittimore Cotton Cards for 12 1/2 bushels corn; one bushel Salt for 10 lbs bacon, 6 bushels corn or 2 1/2 gallons good syrup; one bunch cotton yarn for 15 lbs bacon, 20 lbs lard or 9 bushels corn; one yd Osnaburgs or 4-4 Sheeting for 1 1/4 lbs bacon, 1 3/4 lbs lard or 3/4 bushels corn; one yd Calico for 3 lbs bacon, 4 lbs lard, or 1 3/4 bushels corn; one pair ladies' gaiters for 3 1/4 lbs bacon, 44 lbs lard or 20 bushels corn; one lb good Tobacco for 1 bushel corn; 125 yds Osnaburgs for 1 bale good middling cotton of 500 lbs weight.  Wanted, eggs, butter and chickens, for which we will pay the market price in new issue.  Beers & Brinson.  Albany, Ga.--July 21st 1864.   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, August 3, 1864, p. 3, c. 7

The One-Armed Man's  
Dry Goods Store,  
No. 14, Market Street.

                My customers have a right to know what I, as a merchant keep in my Store, and I as a merchant have a right to let them know the articles I have on hand.  Sit down and copy on your memorandum what you need of the following articles:  . . .
Cotton Cards, . . .
                W. P. Wreford,                               
                Formerly "Crockett", the Knife Mar. [or Man]

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, August 3, 1864, p. 4, c. 7

Cotton Cards.

                Cotton Cards exchanged for Dog, Sheep, Goat, Deer, Mule or Horse skins, either tanned or untanned.             
                At the Montgomery Cotton and Wool Card Factory.                       
                J. D. Hutchison, Agent.  

Cotton Cards.

                Cotton Cards exchanged for Dog, Sheep, Goat, Deer, Mule or Horse skins, either tanned or untanned, at the "City Cotton Card Factory," No. 88 Court street, over Myer & Marx's Tore.                      
                J. C. Clinton.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, August 17, 1864, p. 4, c. 7

To Cotton Card Makers.

                I will tan Sheep, Goat, Dog and Coon Skins, for making Cotton Cards, at one dollar each.  When they are tanned and dressed for making shoes, I charge one half for the other.                        
                J. [?] Sweat,                   
                Ramah [or Kamah], Ala.   

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, September 1, 1864, p. 1, c. 2

Just Received.

Cotton Cards,      
Wool Cards, . . .   
                Burge & Daffin.   
Aug 16, 1864. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, September 20, 1864, p. 1, c. 2

Cotton Cards.

                To the Editor of the Mercury:  I wish to draw attention to this article of prime necessity to the people of the State, which could be imported in so small a bulk, and with so small an expenditure of funds, that I am surprised those blockade companies which have so munificently bestowed large donations for charitable purposes, have not endeavored to supply them at a moderate price, and thus relieving a numerous, industrious and worthy class of the community, whose proper pride and spirit of independence would prevent them from supplying themselves except by purchasing.  These companies, it is acknowledged, have been formed for the purpose of making money.  It is the duty, it may be said, of the directors, to consult the interests of the stockholders by so adjusting their importations as not to overstock the market, and thus reduce profits.  This policy might apply with propriety to all articles of luxury, and to all such as are not essential to cheap clothing, which is second only in importance to cheap food for the people.
               
There is no doubt difficulties in the way of supplying them, so as to have them distributed through the community at a cheap rate without allowing them to fall into the hands of the speculators, large and small, who will in proportion to the low price, be more rapacious.  If the companies would agree upon a schedule of prices for this article--advertise the rates and give the preference to those who purchase for use, and also place them in the hands of honest merchants in the principal towns of the State, to be sold at retail to those who want them for use, they would bestow a benefit to the community which they would not regret.  The policy of an extended bestowal of public charities has been disputed, but no one ever doubted the benefit of providing the industrious with the means of prosecuting their humble pursuits, and these companies have a monopoly of the opportunity of bestowing this great public benefaction.
               
Cards are so easily placed on boards, that of course the leaf card should be imported, occupying as they do, but one-fourth of the space of those framed.  Those now sold in the Bee store at $25 retail, are sold all through the middle and upper districts at $40 to $45.  This rate of profits is unreasonable.  We hope these companies will perceive the propriety of importing this article in quantities to supply the demand at moderate rates, without regard to the policy of limiting importations for fear of bringing down prices.  It is a case to which exception should be made, by advertising the rates at which they would be sold.  We believe the hint will be taken and acted on by those companies which have shown that there are exceptions to the axiom, that success only sharpens the appetite for accumulation.          
                                                                                                  
PUBLICUS   

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, September 21, 1864, p. 3, c. 5

Ladies not to be Conscripted

. . .           Cotton Cards  


At the One Armed Man's  
Dry Goods Store  
14 Market Street

                                                S. F. Wreford.  

MONTGOMERY WEEKLY ADVERTISER, September 21, 1864, p. 3, c. 5

Cotton Cards.

                Cotton Cards exchanged for Dog, Sheep, Goat, Deer, Mule or Horse Skins, either tanned or untanned.             
                At the Montgomery Cotton and Wool Card Factory.                       
                J. D. Hutcheson,  
july9d2w-w4m                                                       Agent.  

GALVESTON NEWS, November 9, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
               
The LaGrange True Issue says:  The machinery for carding has arrived at the Hat Factory in this place, and will be in operation in a few days.  Maj. Kampmann is one of those go ahead kind of men, that works himself, and makes everything and everybody around, or under his control do the same.  The right man in the right place.  We expect to be enabled to report an increased number of soldier's hats turned out from the manufactory in a short time.  This factory delivered to the Clothing Bureau at Houston, between 1600 and 1700 hats during the month of October.
   

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, December 7, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
Wool Cards.--It will be seen, by an advertisement in another column, that Messrs. Smith & Nance have established a Wool Carding Factory on the Blanco, in Hays county, having imported the machinery from England.  From the great scarcity of these machines, and the heavy call for wool rolls for spinning, this establishment will be likely to command an extensive patronage for many miles around.  We have not the pleasure of an acquaintance with Mr. Smith, but we know Mr. Nance to be a most obliging, clever gentleman, and all who go there may depend on being well treated.   

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, December 7, 1864, p. 2, c. 5

Wool Carding Machine.

                The undersigned take pleasure in announcing to this community and the public generally, that they have imported from England a first class Wool Carding machine, and that it is now in operation on the Rio Blanco, Hays County, 7 miles from San Marcos and 4 miles from Mountain City Post Office.
    
           Grease required, one pound of hogs lard, without salt for every eight pounds of wool.  The wool must be entirely free from gum and dirt, and once of the best methods of preparing it, is to wash it in warm soap-suds and lye and rinse also in warm water.  We cannot card finer wool than half-breed merino and do it justice.
    
           Terms.  One third of the wool or 15 cents per pound.    SMITH & NANCE.
    
           December 1st, 1864.
    
           P.S.--On account of the difficulty in producing lumber and other materials, we have been unable to put up accommodations for those who come with the intention of waiting for their Rolls, and therefore advise all such to come prepared for camping.    S&N.   

[BELLVILLE] TEXAS COUNTRYMAN, December 13, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
               
We learn that the specie prices of many articles are advancing.  Cotton cards, for instance, are now sold for $7, and wool cards for $6 per pair, while a few days ago they could be had for some two dollars less per pair.—Galveston News. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 14, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
               
The State Gazette informs us that Messrs. Smith and Nance have established a wool carding machine on the Blanco, in Hays county.  We understand that there are now several such machines in various parts of the State.

CLARKE COUNTY [AL] JOURNAL, December 29, 1864, p. 1, c. 4

Cotton Cards for $2 60!

                We have on hand a superior article of English Cards, on good backs, and larger than the Whittemore, at the above price in specie. . . .                             
                                                                                                                Burge & Davvin. 
Dec. 22, 1864, 42 3t. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, January 11, 1865, p. 2, c. 4

Austin Wool Carding Factory.

This establishment is on Avenue Street below Pecan, and will be in successful operation from the 12th instant.  Bring on your wool if you want it carded.  Wool rolls for sale.  Produce taken in exchange for carding of Wool.
Jan11                                                                                         A. T. Norton & Co., Proprietors.   

[LITTLE ROCK] NATIONAL DEMOCRAT, February 4, 1865, p. 4, c. 1 
                The following item from the Arkansas paper [Washington Telegraph], is suggestive:          
                "A few pairs of cotton cards will be exchanged for pork at the rates of 200 lbs. for each pair.  Enquire at this office."  
                Before the war a pair of cotton cards were worth 60 cents and pork eight cents a pound.  Two hundred pounds of pork would then buy from twenty-five to thirty-five pairs of cards.  Now, it seems, it buys only one. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 1, 1865, p. 2, c. 2     
                Blessing of the Blockade—Texas Home Industry.—We have on our table a group of nineteen samples from the looms of a single plantation, embracing such a variety of quality, material, color and fabric, as to command the admiration of all who see them. . . .  
                The slaves that do the labor in these manufactures were born in the family, and readily learn to perform each their special part in the work.  The intelligence and supervision has been furnished by the lady of the manor, and not a hired assistant in any department has been employed; and only two articles have been purchased to enable them to obtain these results, namely, the cards and the copperas.  The latter of these is abundantly produced in the hills of Texas, and is being rapidly brought into market.  The latter [former], we hope, soon to see manufactured within the State. . . .               

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, March 10, 1865, p. 2m c, 6

Cotton Cards!  
With and Without Backs,  
On Leather & India Rubber,  
For Sale For  
Specie or Confederate Money,  
Or to Give in Exchange for  
Homespun cloth,  
Price:  From $4 to $5 in Specie; Confederate  
money taken at current rates. 

                                                E.  Blood,  
Marshall, Mar. 10, 1865   

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, March 15, 1865, p. 4, c. 1     
                A letter dated Matamoros, February 25th, says:  "Goods are daily falling in this market.  I can buy . . . cotton cards, $10 per dozen; . . . I have filled a bill at these prices. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, April 12, 1865, p. 1, c. 4
                                                                                                               
Executive Department.
                                                                                               
Austin, Texas, March 30th, 1865.
To the County Courts:
    
           The importance of introducing into the country, and putting into operation, machinery for the manufacture of articles necessary to the clothing of the people, and the army in the field, is a subject urgently demanding our most serious attention, and the exercise of our fullest energies.  Experience has shown that a large portion of the clothing for the use of the Texas soldiery, has been furnished at the hands of the industrious and patriotic women of our State. . . This can be most effectively done--in reference to the manufacture of clothing--by the introduction and distribution through the State of wool and cotton carding-machines.  The Manufacture of clothing by the preparation of the raw material by hand carding, is necessarily, slow, tedious, and involves the employment of much more labor than would be necessary in the use of the machinery proposed. . . P. Murrah.   

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, April 14, 1865, p. 2, c. 6

New Goods.

. . .           Cotton Cards, and one Fine Cloth Coat (large size).           
For sale low for Confederate money and cheap for specie.  Interest notes, La. money, coupons of 6 per cent bonds and old issue taken at current rates.                        
                E. Blood.   
April 14, 1865.  

[MARSHALL] TEXAS REPUBLICAN, April 28, 1865, p. 2, c. 4

Valuable Suggestions

Executive Department,                         
                                                                                                                Austin, Texas, March 30th, 1865  
                To the County Courts:    
                The importance of introducing into the country, and putting into operation, Machinery for the manufacture of articles necessary to the clothing of the people and the army in the field, is a subject urgently demanding our most serious attention, and the exercise of our fullest energies.  Experience has shown that a large portion of the clothing for the use of the Texas soldiers, has been furnished at the hands of the industrious and patriotic women of our State.  With a full knowledge of this condition of things, I have never ceased, since being in office, to urge forward and protect, to the extent of my ability, every enterprise calculated to increase the production of home industry, and to render the labor engaged therein more productive.  This can be most effectually done—in reference to the manufacture of clothing—by the introduction and distribution through the State of wool and cotton carding machines.  The manufacture of clothing by the preparation of the raw material by hand carding is, necessarily, slow, tedious, and involves the employment of much more labor than would be necessary in the use of the Machinery proposed.  With such machinery accessible to all the people of the State, how much more self-reliant, and independent we shall be than remaining, as in the great measure we now are, dependent upon an uncertain, tardy, and insufficient supply of goods from abroad.         
                I respectfully call upon you, and through you upon the people and men of capital in your midst, to give this subject your thoughtful and serious consideration, and at once, organizing some system for the introduction of this kind of machinery.  Urge upon those who have means, to engage in this noble enterprise, heartily, patriotically, and earnestly—to merge all considerations of profit, in an unselfish desire to confer upon the people a vast and permanent good.     
                I said in my inaugural:  "What can be accomplished in this line, by associations of individuals and of capital, by enterprise and resolution, can only be determined by preserving systematic effort.  The necessity and the inducements for effort cannot be overrated.  It is far better and far more economical, as I conceive, to make capital yield its profits, not only during the war, but after its close, to make it an enduring monument of a lofty, self-reliant spirit in the people, by investing it in permanent and useful manufacturing establishments, than to squander it away forever in purchasing goods from nations perhaps indifferent to our fate, or from a foe who are striving by all the appliances of war to subjugate and enslave us."         
                I pledge myself as the Executive of the State, to continue to give all the aid in my power, and still to exert my utmost energies, to secure a full co-operation from the Confederate authorities, in furtherance of this object.  One hundredth part of the money now expended by the people in the purchase of foreign goods, would amply supply the required number of carding machines, and besides, afford employment to thousands now idle.        
                It is believed that if the several counties would consider this subject, measure the difficulties to be overcome and engage energetically, and practically in the work, the wants of the country, in this respect, could be soon supplied.  I shall be glad to receive any suggestions as to the most advisable mode of effecting this object.   
                We know not how long this war may continue—how soon supplies from abroad may be cut off.  The Spring has opened upon us—Summer will soon come and pass, and Winter with frosts must be provided against.  Now is the time to be up and doing.                P. Murrah.  

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, May 10, 1865, p. 2, c. 1
A large lot of cotton cards and medicines, imported by the Military Board, has arrived.  We learn that another lot is in transitu between this point and the Rio Grande.  The whole will be distributed as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made for that purpose. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, June 7, 1865, p. 3, c. 1
               
There was a distribution of public property in Austin last week on first principles; all the plunder belonging to the Confederate and State governments was divided out.  Among the rest were 50,000 pairs of cotton cards, any quantity of quinine, satinet, domestics, etc.  The value of cotton cards in that region now is from one to three bits a pair.  And other articles in proportion.—Telegraph.