Soap:
Articles from Civil War Era Newspapers
 

COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, April 10, 1860, p. 3, c. 7
Soap for cleaning silver; Fancy Soaps; . . . at
                                                                                               
Geo.  W. Atkinson & Co's.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 10, 1860, p. 1, c. 3-4 

Fashion Letter.
Correspondence of the Mercury.

                                                                                                                   New York, August 7.
Great Eastern Experience--Particulars of the Voyage-- . . .
There were two windows or port-holes, making shawls and cloaks decidedly necessary.  Mirrors, toilette table, sofa, abundance of fresh clean water and a peerless stewardess, to say nothing of "Old Brown Windsor Soap," and fine damask towels, which being already provided, did not occasion any extra cash.   

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 27, 1860, p. 2, c. 6

Important to the Ladies!
Fresh Stock of
Lubin's Perfumeries!

And Choice Imported Toilet Articles, comprising
Highly Scented Soaps . . .
All of which having been purchased for Cash will be sold at reasonable prices by Van. Schaack & Grierson, Chemists and Druggists, and Importers of Perfumery, Toilet Articles, &c.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 19, 1861, p. 3, c. 4
Soap--200 boxes Proctor & Gamble's Soap, received and for sale by Ray & Grant, Natchez Landing. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, August 14, 1861, p.  2, c. 3

Fancy Toilet Soaps

                Jocky [sic] Club, New-mown Hay, Musk, Honey, Millefleur, Ess. Bouquet, Butterfly Bouquet, &c., &c.
                                                                                               
For sale by
                                                                                                               
John B. Habersham,
                                                                                               
Broughton st. op. St. Andrew's Hall. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, August 20, 1861, p. 1, c. 7
The Virtues of Borax.--The washer women of Holland and Belgium, so proverbially clean, and who get up their linen so beautifully white, use refined borax as washing powder, instead of soda, in the proportion of a large handful of borax powder to about ten gallons of boiling water; they save in soap nearly half.  All the large washing establishments adopt the same mode.  For laces, cambrics, etc., an extra quantity of the powder is used, and for crinolines, (required to be made stiff,) a strong solution is necessary.  Borax being a neutral salt, does not in the slightest degree injure the texture of the linen; its effect is to soften the hardest water, and therefore it should be kept on every toilet table.  To the taste it is rather sweet, is used for cleaning the hair, is an excellent dentifrice, and in hot countries is used in combination with tartaric acid and bicarbonate of soda as a cooling beverage.  Good tea cannot be made with hard water; all water may be made soft by adding a teaspoonful of borax powder to an ordinary sized kettle of water, in which it should boil.  The saving in the quantity of tea used will be at least one-fifth. 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], August 30, 1861, p. 2, c. 4
               
The Virtues of Borax.--The washer women of Holland and Belgium, so proverbially clean, and who get up their linen so beautifully white, use refined borax as washing powder, instead of soda, in the proportion of a large handful of borax powder to about ten gallons of boiling water; they save in soap nearly half.  All the large washing establishments adopt the same mode.  For laces, cambrics, etc., an extra quantity of the powder is used, and for crinolines, (required to be made stiff,) a strong solution is necessary.  Borax being a neutral salt, does not in the slightest degree injure the texture of the linen; its effect is to soften the hardest water, and therefore it should be kept on every toilet table.  To the taste it is rather sweet, is used for cleaning the hair, is an excellent dentifrice, and in hot countries is used in combination with tartaric acid and bicarbonate of soda as a cooling beverage.  Good tea cannot be made with hard water; all water may be made soft by adding a teaspoonful of borax powder to an ordinary sized kettle of water, in which it should boil.  The saving in the quantity of tea used will be at least one-fifth. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, September 29, 1861, p. 2, c. 5

Save Your Ashes.

As Soda Ashes cannot be had any more we have to make a substitute.
If you are willing to save your hard wood Ashes, we will buy it to be able to sell you good Soap at fair prices.
Look out for the Black Boy's halooing ASHES, ASHES, ASHES.

                                                                                           
J. J. Picard & Co., Soap Manufacturers.
                                                                                               
Corner st. Frances and Hamilton sts.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 15, 1861, p. 2, c. 3

Cross & Blackwell's
Chow-Chow Pickles,
Low's Brown Windsor Soap,

                                               
Cannon's.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], October 16, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
               
"How Are You Off for Soap?"--This is a momentous question just at present.  Soap is an indispensable article in every well-regulated household, and its scarcity has carried the price up beyond all precedent.  Bar soap we are told is now selling in this city at 20 cents per lb. by the box.  This is altogether too high--and the remedy should be applied at once.  We hope the report is true which we hear on the streets, that a soap and candle factory is soon to be established in Augusta.  The latter is an essential almost as the former, and any scheme which will tend to increase our stock should meet with cordial encouragement.  Now is the time, if ever, to establish manufactories here for these and other necessaries, for which we have heretofore depended on the north. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], October 26, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
               
Soap and Candles.--A writer in the Charleston Courier says:
               
We have been so long dependent on our Yankee enemies for supplies of the above named articles of universal use, that we have forgotten that we can make them ourselves.  To our shame we admit that, even on our plantations in the low country and seaboard, abounding in materials for making the best candles in the world, millions of pounds have been annually permitted to mature and decay unused.  The low bush myrtle, indigenous to our coast from Virginia, ad libitum, South, the berries of which are now mature, will afford a supply of wax, that, with the addition of one-third tallow, will furnish candles sufficient to light every house in the Confederacy, for the next year, and put a stopper on the exorbitant extortion now practiced on the people for that article.  So, also, on every plantation, nay, in almost every kitchen, the monthly waste of ashes and grease, with the addition of a little lime and salt, and the labor of one person for one day, will make soap enough to cleanse every man, woman and child, and their clothing.  Now, why should we any longer pay thirty cents a pound for soap and sixty cents for candles?  I for one will not. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], November 14, 1861, p. 2, c. 5

Castile Soap.

A superior article of Castile Soap, part of the cargo of steamer Theodora, from Cuba, just received.
nov14-3t                                                                                Chichester & Co. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, November 19, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
Drugs, Chemicals, &c.
10,000 lbs Castile Soap, Genuine. . . .
With a good assortment of soaps, brushes and fine perfumery, for sale by Stevenson & Co., 23 Hayne-street.
 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], November 20, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
               
A large supply of soap may be extracted from every cornfield at this season of the year.  While a thousand pounds of oak wood yield only two and a half-pounds of potash, a thousand pounds of corn stalks will yield seventeen pounds of potash, and soap is made out of potash.  A thousand pounds of oak leaves, burnt to ashes, will yield twenty-four pounds of potash, and soap may be made out of potash. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], November 28, 1861, p. 2, c. 2
               
The manner of making potash in the most perfect way is this:  a quantity of vegetable matter is burnt into gray ashes, and the ashes boiled in water, so as to make a very strong lixivium or ley [lye]; after which, the ley [lye], being previously strained, is evaporated over a quick fire almost to dryness, the matter remaining is put into an iron crucible, melted, and then poured on an iron plate, where, when cool, it appears in the form of a solid lump of potash.
               
To Make Soap.--Take 18 pounds grease, 15 pounds potash or equivalent in ley [lye], pour on it 5 gallons water, boiling, stir it occasionally every day, after three days it will be fit for use, put it in a barrel.  Increase quantities in proportion, if vessel or barrel will hold it.--Mobile Tribune. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], December 15, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
               
Cotton Seed for Soap.--It is said that cotton seed oil is equal, of not superior, to the ordinary refuse grease for soap.  The process is so simple that any housewife may with little trouble, make the experiment.  Put as much cotton seed into a large strong iron pot, or wooden mortar, as can be mashed with a pestle, crush or mash them well; then boil in strong lye, and proceed as in the usual way.  As grease may be scarce next year, it may be well to begin with experiments before the grease is exhausted.--Home Journal. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, December 16, 1861, p.  1, c. 5
               
Cotton Seed for Soap.—It is said that cotton seed oil is equal, if not superior, to the ordinary refuse grease for soap.  The process is so simple that any housewife may with little trouble make the experiment.  Put as much cotton seed into a large strong iron pot, or wooden mortar, as can be mashed with a pestle, crush or mash them well; then boil in strong lye, and proceed as in the usual way.  As grease may be scarce next year, it may be well to begin with experiments before the grease is exhausted.—Home Journal.
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
               
Cotton Seed for Soap.—It is said that cotton seed oil is equal, of not superior to the ordinary refuse-greese [sic] for soap.  The process is so simple that any housewife may, with little trouble, make the experiment.  Put as much cotton seed into a large strong iron pot, or wooden mortar, as can be mashed with a pestle, crush or mash them well; then boil in strong lye, and proceed as in the usual way.  As greese [sic] may be scarce next year, it may be well to begin with experiments before the greese [sic] is exhausted.
                                                                                                                               
[Home Journal.
 

CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE, January 23, 1862, p. 1, c. 7

For Chapped Hands
Use the
Cocoaine Soap,                    Cocoaine Soap,
Cocoaine Soap,                    Cocoaine Soap,
Cocoaine Soap,                    Cocoaine Soap,
Cocoaine Soap,                    Cocoaine Soap,
Cocoaine Soap,                    Cocoaine Soap,

                For all roughness and exfalliations [sic] of the Skin.  Nothing equals it, and for producing an abundant pasty lather it is guarranteed [sic] equal to the best English or French Soaps.  Put up in boxes containing three cakes at 35 and 50 cents per box.  We also offer over 100 different varieties of English, French and American Soaps of the best makes.  
                                                                                                     
Smith & Dwyer,
                                                                                                               
Druggists and Chemists,
                                                                                                          
Opposite the Tremont House. 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], February 5, 1862, p. 3, c. 4

New Goods!

Just received and for sale---. . . Soaps, in great varieties; . . . at R. M. Smith's Drug Store. 
Feb. 5 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], February 7, 1862, p. 1, c. 2
Soap Making.--We were very much interested yesterday in going through the soap manufactory of Messrs. C. C. Morgan & Co., at the corner of St. Joseph and New Levee, to observe the works and the curious process of soap making.  They are now turning out three kinds of soap, Nos. 1, 2 and 3, which we learn is equal to anything of the kind ever imported from the North, either as to quality or price, while they carry on the business upon such a scale as to enable them to fill the largest orders.  This is only one of the many evidences that necessity is the mother of invention, and that we have skill and enterprise in plenty in our midst.--N. O. True Delta, 2d. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], March 17, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
               
Large Amount of Soap Produced from Myrtle Wax--A correspondent of the Charleston Courier gives the following:
               
I find the following recipe for making soap from Myrtle wax (Myrica cerifera) in an old number of the Southern Agriculturist.  As one of the complaints of soap makers is the difficulty and expense of obtaining the grease, it will be well for us to avail ourselves of a production of Nature, found abundantly in our lower country.  The fruit is now matured, and may be had in abundance for the picking.  I saw, this day, very good candles made of Myrtle wax.  I trust our planters, residing in the vicinities of the Myrtle, will profit by these advantages before the season for picking has passed. 
               
Yours,                                                                                    J. B.
               
"To three bushels and a half of common wood ashes add half a bushel of unslaked lime.  This being well mixed together, put into a cask capable of containing sixty gallons, and fill up with water.  In forty-eight hours the ley [sic] will be strong enough to float an egg.  Then draw off, and from six to eight gallons of it put into a copper kettle, capable of containing twenty five gallons.  To this add only four pounds of Myrtle wax.  Keep constantly boiling for six hours.  For the first three or four hours pour in occasionally a supply of strong ley [lye], the whole frequently well stirred with a ladle.--After six hours' boiling, throw in two quarts of common large grain salt into the kettle, leave one hour more to simmer over a slow fire.  The liquor must be placed in tubs to cool for twenty-four hours.  Take out the soap, wipe it clean; put it to dry.
               
"The produce of this soap when it was weighed the next day was found to be forty-nine pounds of good solid soap, from the materials and by the process above mentioned.  At the end of six weeks the soap had only lost a few pounds from the evaporation of its watery particles.
               
"In many parts of our State the Myrtle tree is abundant, and from three pecks to a bushel may be gathered from a hand per day.  Would it not be worth the while of the planters to attend to this matter?  I am sure it would save them many a dollar.                    Economy." 

WASHINGTON [ARK.] TELEGRAPH, April 30, 1862
HOSPITAL STORES.--About twenty-five ladies had an informal meeting at this place last Monday for the purpose of co-operating in forwarding stores for the hospital at Little Rock. . . .  It may not be generally known that half worn clothes, such as shirts, drawers, socks, underclothes of all sorts, sheets, pillow cases, &c., are very much needed, and also large quantities of soap for washing.  Soldiers are brought into the hospital in heavy woolen clothes, generally much soiled.  They have mostly no change of garments, and are utterly unfit to be comfortably nursed.  The hospital requires large stores to be kept constantly clean for frequent change.  Life often depends on it, to say nothing of the comfort of the poor fellow, who lies many a weary day, thinking of home.  Any food or herbs suitable for the sick or convalescent will also be acceptable.  The articles will be stored and packed at Mr. Carrigan's Commissary store, next to Moore & Smith's drug store. 

DAILY CHRONICLE & SENTINEL [AUGUSTA, GA], May 2, 1862, c. 3, c. 1
               
Soap and Candle Manufactory.--Two most essential articles, for which we have heretofore depended on the North, are soap and candles.  They are indispensable in all well regulated households.  Mr. J. V. Clark, whose advertisement appears in another column, is engaged in the manufacture of a superior article of candles, of various grades and prices, and suited to the season.  We have tried some of his candles, and found them to be excellent, as we noticed in our columns sometime since.  He is also making good hard and soft soap.  At a considerable outlay, he has embarked in this enterprise, and he should be encouraged and patronized.  Having cut loose from the North and its manufactured wares, let us stimulate home industry by all available means.
               
Mr. Clark's establishment is near the corner of Broad street and Bridge Row. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, May 6, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Home Made Soap and Starch.--A lady sends us the following simple and useful recipe for making soap and starch:  Put up the bones of everything for a fortnight, and then boil them in strong lye, skimming as long as the grease rises.  The next day boil the grease with strong lye until it becomes soap.  Put some lime in the lye barrel, and it makes much better soap.  All of my starch is soft hominy or gruel strained.  If you have not come to it yet, try it.  How much this war will teach us!
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 8
               
Home-Made Soap and Starch.—A lady sends us the following simple and useful recipe for making soap and starch.  Put up the bones of everything for a fortnight, and then boil them in strong lye, skimming as long as the grease rises.  The next day boil the grease with strong lye until it becomes soap.  Put some lime in the lye barrel, and it makes much better soap.  All of my starch is soft hominy or gruel, strained.  If you have not come to it yet, try it.  How much this war will teach us!—Charleston Mercury.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
               
Recipe for Making Soap.—A correspondent gives the following recipe for soap-making, and adds, that it would be worth one thousand dollars in the hands of a selfish person, and the world would have to untie the purse strings to get it, but here it is free gratis:
               
Take six pounds of potash,
               
Four pounds of lard,
               
One fourth pound of rosin.
               
Beat up the rosin, mix all together well, and set aside for five days, then put the whole into a ten gallon cask of warm water and stir twice a day for ten days, at the expiration of which time, or sooner, you will have some excellent soap.
               
It seems to us that every family should make their own soap in these times of high prices.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], June 5, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale at Auction of 4731 Packages of
English Goods, direct from London, put up
expressly for this Market.
by R. A. Pringle,
At No. 137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, S. C.,
J. H. Taylor, Auctioneer.
On Wednesday Morning, June 11th,
1862, commencing at 10 o'clock.. . .

250 boxes Crown Mottled Soap
250 boxes Crown Soap . . .
12 cases Old Brown Windsor Soap 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 7, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale at Auction of
4,731 Packages
English Goods,
Direct from London, and put up expressly for this Market,
By R. A. Pringle,
Jas. H. Taylor, Auctioneer.

               
On Wednesday morning, June 11, at 187 Meeting Street,  commencing at 10 o'clock.

. . .
250 boxes Crown Mottled Soap
250 boxes Crown Soap . . .
12 cases Old Brown Windsor Soap
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Baths, Baths.

Hot or Cold Baths, from this date FIFTY CENTS.  Sorry to be compelled to raise the price of bathing; but, from the high price of living articles, I cannot help it.
               
Gentlemen finding their own soap can get three tickets for $1.00.
                                                                                                                    
        J. M. Haywood.
 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 2, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Cotton Seed Soap.--Put cotton seed into a large and strong iron pot, in small quantities at a time, mash them well with a wooden pestle, and then pour in a certain quantity of common ley [lye], and boil thoroughly; strain in an ordinary sieve, and proceed in the usual way, in drying and cutting into cakes.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], August 2, 1862, p. 2, c. 6

Dye Stuffs, Drugs, &c.
at Wholesale

. . . 600 lbs. Toilet Soaps, . . .
                                               
                                                          Hamilton, Markley & Joiner. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, August 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
               
Manufacture of Soap.--One of the greatest wants of the Confederacy, and especially of the army, has lately been soap.  We are glad to see that in Richmond the article is now produced to such an extent as to cause a fall of price from a dollar or more to fifty cents a pound.  A few days ago, says the Fayetteville Observer, we were presented with a very creditable specimen of turpentine bar soap, made by a lady of this town, under the direction of a. J. O'Hanlon, esq.  She can turn out 100 pounds a week. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, August 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Brown Windsor
Soap.
One Case,
Just received by
Recent Arrival Direct from  Europe,

                                                                                                                A. A. Solomons & co.
                                                                                                                               
Druggists.
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, August 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 6
               
A correspondent sends us the following recipe for making soap without grease, which is of importance to housekeepers at this time:
               
To four gallons of strong ley add ten pounds of distilled rosin, or eight pounds of pine gum not distilled and free of trash is better; boil steadily until there is no rosin to be seen, and if the quantity of ley is not sufficient, add more and continue to add until the rosin is out, and boil until it makes a brown jelly soap.  I have used this soap for a year, and it is equal to the best soap made with grease.
 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], August 20, 1862, p. 3, c. 5
Just Received and for Sale,
. . . Toilet Soaps; . . . at R. M. Smith 8 Drug Store. No. 10 Broad street.
August 20. 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], August 27, 1862, p. 4, c. 3
Soap Without Grease.--To four gallons of strong lye add ten pounds of distilled rosin, or eight pounds of pine gum, not distilled and free from trash is better; boil steadily until there is no rosin to be seen, and if the quantity of lye is not sufficient add more, and continue to add until the rosin is out, and boil until it makes a brown jelly soap.  I have used this soap for a year, and it is equal to the best soap made with grease. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, September 2, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Blockade Sales.—We are becoming more convinced day after day of the injurious effects of the auction sales of cargoes which run the blockade.  The prices of the goods sold in Charleston are almost fabulous, and of course are paid by speculators, who advance even these extravagant prices to the consumer.  Just think of it, candles $3.35 cents per pound, soap $1,70 cents, tea $14 per pound, and other articles in proportion!
               
Some of our merchants attended the sale, but bought nothing.  The principal buyers were merchants and dealers from Richmond and Petersburg, who run up the goods to enormous prices.  The effect of all this is simply this:  our merchants return home, and finding that they had been retailing goods cheaper than they were sold at a "cargo sale," and that there was no probability of replenishing their stocks at fair buying prices.  These cargo sales benefit nobody but the petty jobbers and speculators at a distance, and have become a serious injury to the legitimate merchant and consumer.—Columbia Guardian.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, September 3, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
               
Important Item for Housekeepers.—In view of the exceeding great scarcity of "soap grease," and the necessity that exists among all classes for keeping a supply of the article on hand for the promotion of cleanliness, the following receipt for making soap without grease, from a valued lady friend, will be found very valuable at this time.  It has been sufficiently tested to assure us of its great importance and usefulness:  To four gallons of strong ley add ten pounds of distilled rosin, or eight pounds of pine gum not distilled and free of trash is better; boil steadily until there is no rosin to be seen, and if the quantity of ley is not sufficient, add more and continue to add until the rosin is out, and boil until it makes a brown jelly soap.  I have used this soap a year, and it is equal to the best soap made with grease.—[Exchange paper.
 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, September 5, 1862, p. 1, c. 4
Cotton Seed Soap.  Put cotton seed into a large and strong iron pot, in small quantities at a time, mash them well with a wooden pestle, and then pour in a certain quantity of common ley [lye], and boil thoroughly; strain in an ordinary sieve, and proceed in the usual way, in drying and cutting into cakes. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, September 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Just Received from Charleston,

                A fine lot of English Tooth Brushes and Windsor Soaps, and also the following Handkerchief Extracts:  Kiss me Quick, Frangipanni, Verbena, Moss Rose, Violet, Patchuly, Rondelitia, Carnation, Jockey Club, Piccolomini, West End, Spirit of Love,
               
At the Drug Store of                                            S. D. Brantley.
 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, October 3, 1862, p. 2, c. 4

Soft Soap!
We are now making a superior article of
Jelly Soap.
Price 12 ½ Cents per Pound,
By the Barrel.
Orders are respectfully solicited.

                                                                                                                A. Dutenhofer & co.
                                                                                                                               
Atlanta, Ga.
 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, October 11, 1862, p. 1, c. 4

[For the Evening News]
Tallow Candles Equal to Star.

                Messrs. Editors:  It may be of interest to your numerous readers to know that, with not a cent of additional expense, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle.
               
To two pounds of tallow add one teacupful of good strong ley from wood ashes, and simmer over a slow fire—when a greasy scum will float on top; skim this off for making soap, (it is very near soap already) as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller—and you have a pure, hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make—and one that burns as long and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.  An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits turpentine will make it burn some brighter.  I write with one before me.
                                                                                          Yours, W.
               
West Point, Miss., Oct. 5th, 1862. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, October 13, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
                                                                                           
Richmond, Wednesday, October 8.
. . . Brown Windsor and honey soaps are now manufactured here by a Monsieur Garcia.  . . .
Hermes.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], October 16, 1862, p. 3, c. 1

Tallow Candles Equal to Star.

Messrs. Editors Mobile Register & Advertiser:
               
It may be of interest to your numerous readers to know that, with not a cent of additional expense, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle.
               
To two pounds of tallow add one teacupful of good strong 'ley' [lye] from wood ashes, and simmer over a slow fire--when a greasy scum will float on top; skim this off for making soap, (it is very near soap already) as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller--and you have a pure, hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make--and one that burns as long and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.--An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits turpentine will make it burn some brighter.  I write with one before me.
                                                                   
Yours,                                                                    W.
               
West Point, Miss., Oct. 5th, 1862. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, October 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 5

Tallow Candles Equal to Star.

                                                                                                West Point, Miss., Oct. 5, 1862.
Editors Mobile Register & Advertiser:
               
It may be of interest to your numerous readers to know that, with not a cent of additional expense, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle.
               
To two pounds of tallow add one teacupful of good strong ley from wood ashes, and simmer over a slow fire, when a greasy scum will float on top; skim this off for making soap, (it is very near soap already), as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller—and you have a pure, hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make, and one that burns as long and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.  An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits turpentine will make it burn some brighter.  I write with one before me.             Yours,                                    W.
 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], November 5, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Tallow Candles Equal to Star

Messrs. Editors:--It may be of some interest to your numerous readers to know that, with not a cent of additional expense, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle.
To two pounds tallow add one teacupful of good ley [lye] from wood ashes, and simmer over a slow fire, when greasy scum will float on top; skim this off for soap, (it is very soap already,) as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual making the wicks a little smaller, and you have a pure hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make, and one that burns as long, and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.--An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits turpentine will make it burn some brighter.  I write with one before me.--Mobile News. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, November 14, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Recipe for Making Soap.—Pour 12 quarts of soft boiling water upon 5 lbs. of unslaked lime; then dissolve 5 lbs. of washing soda in 12 quarts of boiling water.  Mix the above together, and let the mixture remain together from 12 to 24 hours, for the purpose of chemical action.  Now pour off all the clear liquid, being careful not to disturb the sediments.  Add to the above 3 ½ lbs. of clarified grease, and from 3 to 4 ounces of rosin.  Boil this compound together one hour, and pour off to cool.  Cut it up in bars for use, and you are in possession of a superior chemical soap, costing about 3 ½ cents per pound.
 

DALLAS HERALD, November 15, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Tallow Candles Equal to Star.—Messrs. Editors:--It may be of interest to your numerous readers to know that, with not a cent of additional cost, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle.  To two pounds of tallow add one tea-cup full of strong ley [lye], from wood ashes, and simmer over a slow fire, when the greasy scum will float over the top; skim this off for making soap, (it is very near soap already,) as long as it continues to rise.—Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller, and you have a pure, hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make, and one that burns as long and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.  An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits turpentine will make it burn some brighter.--—write with one before me.—Mobile News. 

SAN ANTONIO HERALD, November 15, 1862, p. 2, c.3
               
Tallow Candles Equal to Star.--Messrs. Editors:  It may be of some interest to your readers to know that without a cent of additional cost, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle.
               
To two pounds tallow add one teacupful of good strong ley from wood ashes, and simmer over a slow fire, when a greasy scum will float on the top skim this off for making soap (it is very near soap already,) as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller, and you have a pure, hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make, and one that burns as long and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.  An ounce of two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits turpentine will make them burn some brighter.  I write with one before me.--Mobile News.
 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], November 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 5
                We were presented with a piece of soap by Mr. J. I. McAllister, of this place, the other day, of his own manufacture.  It is perfumed with sassafras, and made--we don't know how; but is certainly a very good article.  There is but one thing to prevent the people of the South from making every thing they need, and that is the long-continued habit of depending upon somebody else to do it.  They have made their money so easily heretofore, and had so many China and mulberry trees to shade them in the Summer time, that they have found it more comfortable to *buy* than to *make* such articles as they needed.  If the present revolution shall learn *everybody to go to work,* it will accomplish something for us; if not, it will be a useless expenditure of blood and treasure.  Without *labor* there can be no excellence. 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], December 3, 1862, p. 3, c. 4

                                Just Received.
100 lbs white bar soap;
100 lbs Castile Soap;
50 lbs Cocoa nut oil soap;
6 doz. brown Windsor Soap;
2   "    Honey Soap;
                                                               
at R. M. Smith's,
Dec. 3.                                                                    No. 10 Main St. 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, December 6, 1862, p. 1, c. 5
               
Tallow Candles Equal to Star.—Messrs. Editors:  It may be of some interest to your numerous readers to know that with not a cent of additional expense, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle.
               
To two pounds of tallow add one teacupful of good strong ley [lye], from wood ashes, and simmer over a slow fire, when a greasy scum will float on top; skim this off for making soap, (it is very near soap already,) as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller, and you have a pure, hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make, and one that burns as long and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.  An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits turpentine will make it burn some brighter.  I write with one before me.—Mobile News. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, December 16, 1862, p. 2, c. 6
               
Recipe for Making Soap.—Pour 12 qts. of soft boiling water upon 5 lbs. of unslacked lime.  Then dissolve 5 lbs. of washing soda in 12 quarts of boiling water.  Mix the above together and let the mixture remain together from 12 to 24 hours, for the purpose of chemical action.  Now pour off all the clear liquid—being careful not to disturb the sediment.  Add to the above 3 ½ lbs. of clarified grease, and from three to four ounces of rosin.  Boil this compound together one hour, and pour off to cool.  Cut it up in bars for use, and you are in possession of a superior chemical soap costing about three and a half cents per square.
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 13, 1863, p. 2, c. 5
               
How to Make Good Soap.—Take good strong lye from oak ashes and chop fine a good parcel of corn shucks, put them in the lye, boil until the lye eats up the shucks, add more shucks, taking the strings out, then you will have good soap.—Char. Courier.
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, January 20, 1863, p. 1. c. 7
               
A Cheap and Excellent Soap.—The following recipe, handed to us by a South Carolina planter, will be most acceptable in these times of scarcity.  He assures us no better soap can be made.
                                                                                                                               
[Sav. Rep.
               
To eight quarts of strong ley, add three pints of pine gum or three pounds of rosin; boil for five or six hours, stirring well to keep the fluid from burning at the bottom.  A little wheat flour added will make it hard, if desired.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, January 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 2

How to Make Good Soap.

                Take good strong lye from oak ashes and chop fine a good parcel of corn shucks, put them in the lye, boil until the lye eats up the shucks, add more shucks, taking the strings out, then you will have good soap.
               
We copy the above from the Charleston Courier, and hope some of our readers will give it a trial, and let us know the result.
 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], January 31, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Package Sale.  The Cargoes of the British Steamers
Calypso and Douglas
by R. A. Pringle,
137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, South Carolina,
James H. Taylor, Auctioneer.
On Wednesday Morning, February 11th, 1863,
commencing at 10 o'clock, will be sold,. . .

21 gross Brown Windsor Soap . . . 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], January 31, 1863, p. 2, c. 6

Cargo Sale of Imported Goods
By R. A. Pringle,
No. 137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, South Carolina,
James H. Taylor, Auctioneer
On Tuesday Morning, February 3, 1863, commencing
at 10 o'clock, will be sold,

. . .
58 boxes Family Soap 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, February 14, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Fruit Trees, &c.  I have left, a few choice peach trees; also Hand Soap; Rouge Balls; Blank books; Fresh Cabbage Seed; Paint and White-wash Brushes; and Knitting Needles.  For sale by Geo. W. Fox, Cotton Square Drug Store.  feb14 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], February 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Cargo Sale of Goods, Imported Ex British
Steamers.
By R. A. Pringle,
137 Meeting Street,
Charleston, South Carolina,
James H. Taylor, Auctioneer.

                On Thursday, 26th February, 1863, commencing at 10 o'clock—

. . . 140 dozen Brown Windsor Soap
119 dozen Fancy Soap . . . 

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA], February 24, 1863, p. 2, c. 5

Goods by Recent Arrivals per Steamers from Europe
by John G. Milnor & Co.,
Charleston, S. C.

                On Thursday, the 26th instant, at 1 o'clock, we will sell at our Store, a large and desirable assortment of Goods, just received, consisting in part:

Sundries.

. . . 47 dozen Toilet Soap . . . 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, February 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
               
Washing Clothes.—It is said that in washing clothes, the addition of three quarters of an ounce of borax to a pound of soap, melted in without boiling makes a saving of one half cost of soap, and three-fourths the labor of washing, besides the usual caustic effect is removed, and the hands are left with a peculiar soft and silky feeling, leaving nothing more to be desired by the ambitious washerwoman. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 17, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Just received, cotton cards, quinine, toilet soap, spool cotton, shoe-thread, and matches.  J. M. Benbrook, at Hewit & Coulson's old stand.  mar17 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 24, 1863, p. 1, c. 4
Just Received.  20,000 large needles; 12 doz. toilet soap; . . . which will be sold for cash only, by E. Lewis, Auctioneer, Commerce Street.  mar24. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, March 31, 1863, p.  1, c. 5
Just Received.  Cotton cards; toilet soap; spool cotton; . . .  J. M. Benbrook, at Hewit & Coulson's Old Stand.  mar31. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, April 9, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Blockade Goods!!  Just Received:-- . . . Will be in store shortly--. . . 250 lbs. Castile soap; . . . which will be sold for cash only, at the sale room of E. Lewis.  apr9. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [JACKSON, MS], April 22, 1863, p. 2, c. 7
Soap! Soap! Soap for the Million.  All of you who want bar soap, put up in boxes, can obtain the same at as reasonable prices as the times will permit by applying at the Soap Factory, near the Confederate House, Jackson, Miss.           G. T. Lynch, Proprietor.
P.S.--I will sell Soft Soap at 15 cents per pound.  It will be of first rate quality.  All parties wishing the same must furnish barrels.  Brigade commissaries and others will do well to have all the Grease they can spare shipped to me.  I will pay a high price for the same.  All orders accompanied with the cash, or grease shipped will be punctually attended to. 
                                                                                                    
                G. T. Lynch. 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 1, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Just Received.  300 pounds Spanish Castile Soap; . . . which will be sold low at the Salon Room of E. Lewis.  may1.
Shaving soap, pipes, &c.  . . . For sale at Cotton Square Drug Store.  may1. 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, May 5, 1863, p. 1, c. 8
               
Tallow Candles.—It may be of some interest to our numerous readers to know that, with not a cent of additional expense, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle:
               
To two pounds of tallow add one teacup full of good ley from good ashes, and simmer over a slow fire, when a greasy scum will float on top; skim this off for soap, (it is almost soap already) as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller, and you have a pure hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make, and one that burns as long, and gives a light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.  An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits of turpentine will make it burn some brighter.  I write with one before me—Mobile News.
 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, May 9, 1963, p. 1, c. 5
               
How to make good soap.—Take good strong ley [lye]from oak ashes and chop fine a good parcel of cornshucks put them in ley, boil until the ley eats up the shucks, add more shucks, taking the strings out they you will have good soap.                                          G.
               
[A sample can bee seen at the Courier office.—Charleston  Courier] 

NATCHEZ DAILY COURIER, May 14, 1863, p. 1, c. 5
Just Received, and for sale by the undersigned, a lot of Calico's; linen check; handkerchiefs; coarse Lowels; rock salt and soap.  G. Lemle.  Franklin Street.  my14. 

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, May 18, 1863, p. 1, c. 5

Direct Importation from Paris.
F. Gradot
Has just received from Paris the following
articles:

. . . Fancy Soap, and many other goods too numerous to mention. . . .
               
All these goods are now ready for inspection.              
                                                                                               
118 Broughton Street. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, May 27, 1863, p. 2, c. 6
                                                                           
Lone Star Soap and Candle Factory,                }
                                                                                                       
Houston, May 21st, 1863.    }
From and after this date, Mr. John Collins is my Agent for the sale of my Soap, Oil and Candles.
                                                                    
                Fkank Fabj [sic?]
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, June 9, 1863, p. 1, c. 7
               
Mrs. Wm. N. Wyatt has sent us a sample of soft soap made without the use of a particle of grease, which is equal to the best article of the kind we ever saw; and as the process of making it is simple and the ingredients within the reach of all, we take pleasure in making it known that the public may be benefitted [sic] thereby.
               
Take corn shucks, remove the hard, or shank end, strip those up find, and place them in a pot or kettle of strong boiling ley, stir until all the particles of shuck are consumed; add a tea-cup full of pine gum or rosin, to an ordinary pot full, and you will have as good soap as you could wish.  We presume that the soap could be hardened in the usual way, if desirable.—Marion Commonwealth.
 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 25, 1863, p. 1, c. 8

Making Soap.

One of our lady subscribers sent us a specimen of soap manufactured under her own direction.  Some of our female friends to whom we showed it were so much pleased with it, that they asked us to write to her for full directions as to its manufacture.  The receipt we publish below.  Our friend says in a private letter to us "You may tell your lady friends that much of the beauty of the soap depends on the personal attention to the cleaning the utensils; as the least impurity will discolor soap.  I always have the iron pot in which I make soap well rubbed with dry corn meal after it is washed and apparently clean; if the meal in rubbing becomes dark, I throw it out and get more.  If your friends have no moulds, while the soap is hot it can be poured into a shallow dish, previously made wet.  This will make it come out of the dish without sticking."  As our correspondent has taken five premiums for her soap in different parts of Virginia, our readers may be assured that the recipe is a good one.  All of us may learn to do something; and everything that tends to make us independent is good for the country--Southern Churchman.
                Have ready hickory lye strong enough to bear an egg, showing the size of a dime above the surface of the lye.  To three pounds of clean fat, after being melted, add two gallons of lye and a bit of lime the size of a walnut; boil fast, and stir frequently.  When it has boiled an h our, stir in two gallons of the lye; continue to stir it often and always one way.  After it has boiled for several hours, take out a spoonful and cool it on a plate; if it does not jelly add a little water; if this causes it to jelly, add water to that in the kettle--stir it very quickly while the water is poured in, till you perceive that it ropes on the stick, or becomes heavy.  When this is the case, you have what is called jelly soap, or soft soap by some.  To make it hard, stir in one quart of salt into the kettle, and let it boil ten minutes longer; set it by to cool.  Next day cut the soap out of the kettle, and clarify it by melting it over, adding water enough barely to cover it; let it just come to a boil and set it away.  When perfectly cool and firm, turn it out of the oven, scrape off any of the residue that may adhere to the cake of soap, cut it in pieces, and place it on boards to harden.
                To make this soap fit for toilet purposes it is only necessary to cut it into thin shavings, place it in a very nice tin pan, add a little water, scarcely enough to cover the shavings; set it on some embers and stir and beat it with a nice spoon until it becomes a smooth jelly; while in this state, if you wish to color it mix Chinese vermilion in a little water and stir it in till you get the desired hue; take it off the fire and add oil of lavender, bergamot, sassafras, or any other essential oil, the scent of which you like; and while it is somewhat liquid pour it into moulds. 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], July 13, 1863, p. 3, c. 5
New Goods.  Soda, Bluestone; Bengal Indigo' Black Pepper; Coperas [sic]; Arrow Root; Maccaboy Snuff; Prices Glycerine [sic]; English Mustard; English Table Salt; Lead Pencils; Toilet Powders; Lily White; Dressing Combs; Toilet Soap; Brown Windsor Soap, &c.
For sale at                                                              R. M. Smith's.
July 15. 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, July 22, 1863, p. 1, c, 3
               
Tallow Candles.—It may be of some interest to our numerous readers to know that, with not a cent of additional expense, tallow candles can be made fully equal in point of merit to the common star candle:
               
To two pounds of tallow add one tea-cup full of good ley from good ashes, and simmer over a slow fire, when a greasy scum will float on top; skim this off for soap, (it is almost soap already) as long as it continues to rise.  Then mould your candles as usual, making the wicks a little smaller, and you have a pure hard tallow candle, worth knowing how to make, and one that burns as long and gives light equal to sperm.  The chemistry demonstrates itself.  An ounce or two of beeswax will make the candle some harder, and steeping the wicks in spirits of turpentine will make it burn some brighter.  I write with one before me.—Mobile News.
 

WEEKLY COLUMBUS [GA] ENQUIRER, July 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 6

Making Soap.

                One of our lady subscribers sent us a specimen of soap manufactured under her own directions.  Some of our female friends to whom we shoed it were so much pleased with it, that they asked us to write to her for full directions as to its manufacture.  The receipt we publish below.  Our friend says in a private letter to us "You may tell your lady friends that much of the beauty of the soap depends on personal attention to the cleaning of the utensils, as the least impurity will discolor soap.  I always have the iron pot in which I make soap well rubbed with dry corn meal after it is washed and apparently clean; if the meal in rubbing becomes dark, I throw it out and get more.  If your friends have no moulds, while the soap is hot it can be poured into a shallow dish, previously made wet.  This will make it come out of the dish without sticking.  As our correspondent has taken five premiums for her soap in different parts of Virginia, our readers may be assured that the receipt is a good one.  All of us may learn to do something, and everything that tends to make us independent is good for the country.—Southern Churchman.
               
Have ready hickory lye strong enough to bear an egg, showing the size of a dime above the surface of the lye.  To three pounds of clean fat, after being melted, add three gallons of lye to a bit of lime the size of a walnut; boil fast, and stir frequently.  When it is boiled an hour, stir in two gallons of the lye; continue to stir it often and always one way.  After it has boiled several hours, take out a spoonful and cool it on the plat; if it does not jelly add a little water; if this causes it to jelly, add while the water is poured in, till you perceive that it ropes on the stick, or becomes heavy.  When this is the case you have jelly soap, called soft soap by some.  To make it hard stir in one quart of salt into the kettle, and let it boil ten minutes longer, then set it by to cool.  Next day cut the soap out of the kettle and clarify it by melting it over, adding water enough barely to cover it; let it just come to a boil and set it away.  When perfectly cool and firm, turn it out  of the oven, scrape off any of the residuum that may adhere to the cake of the soap, cut it in pieces, and place it on boards to harden.
               
To make this soap fit for toilet purposes it is only necessary to cut it into thin shavings place it in a nice tin pan, add a little water, scarcely enough to cover the shavings; set it on some embers and stir and beat it with a nice spoon until it becomes a smoothe [sic] jelly; while in this state, if you wish to color it mix Chinese vermillion [sic] in a little water, and stir it in till you get the desired hue, take it off the fire and add oil of lavender, bergamot, sassafras, or other essential oil, the scent of which you like; and while it is somewhat liquid pour it into moulds.
 

SAN ANTONIO HERALD, August 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 3
               
To Make White, Clear, Hard, Tallow Candles.--For 40 pounds of unrendered tallow take eight or ten prickley-pear leaves, of ordinary size, burn off the prickles, slice up the leaves into small strips and cook them with the tallow.  After it is strained put in about two pints of strong ashes-lye, and boil until the lye is all out, skimming off that which rises to the surface, which may be used in making soap.  The tallow will then be very clear, and will make a very superior candle; which will give a good light, and be in all respects equal to the star candle.  We have seen and used candles made by this process, and we know it will work as stated above.  For a less or greater quantity of tallow the other ingredients should be used in proportion.
 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], August 24, 1864, p. 3, c. 6

Goods--Goods!

. . . Bar, Toilet and Castile soap; . . .
.                                                                               I. M. Kenney,
                                                                                            next door above Bank of Athens.
Aug. 24, 1864. 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER, [ATLANTA, GA], August 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 5

Auction Sales.
A splendid Assortment
by a
Late Arrival.

Will be sold AT AUCTION, at Galserville [?], on Wednesday, September [illegible], 1863, the following list of articles just received by Spanish Star Isabel 2nd:
. . .
1000 pounds Spanish castile soap . . .
12 do     rose soap
12 do     almond soap . . .
The above will be a bona fide sale.
                                                                               
Y. A. Mason, Auct'r. 

DALLAS HERALD, September 9, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
To Make White, Clear, Hard, Tallow Candles.—For 40 pounds of unrendered tallow take eight or ten prickley-pear [sic] leaves, of ordinary size, burn off the prickles, slice up the leaves into small strips and cook them with the tallow.  After it is strained put in about two pints of strong ashes-lye, and boil until the lye is all out, skimming off that which rises to the surface, which may be used in making soap.  The tallow will then be very clear, and will make a very superior candle, which will give a good light, and be in all respects equal to the star-candle.  We have seen and used candles made by this process, and we know it will work as stated above.  For a less or greater quantity of tallow, the other ingredients should be used in proportion.—Telegraph. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, January 16, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
               
Recipe for Washing Clothes.—The night before washing day, put the clothes to soak in cold water, and also place on the hot stove, in a suitable vessel, two pounds of soap, cut small; one ounce borax and two quarts of water.  These may be left to simmer till the fire goes out; in the morning the mixture will be solid.  On washing day operations are commenced by setting on a stove or furnace the wash-kettle nearly filled with cold water.  Into this put one-fourth of a pound of the compound, and then wring out the clothes that have been soaking, and put them into the kettle.  By the time that the water is scalding hot, the clothes will be ready to take out.  Drain them well, and put them into clean cold water, and then thoroughly rinse them twice, and they are ready to be hung out.  When more water is added to the wash-kettle, more soap should also be added but the quantity needed will be very small.  This process has many advantages over others.  It is suitable for washing every kind of fabric; it is especially good for flannels, and seems to set colors rather than remove them from dresses or shawls, while the white clothes are rendered exceedingly white.  It costs less for soap than the common mode of washing; it is only half as laborious, the clothes are thoroughly cleansed in much less time, but not least, the soap does not act like caustic upon the hands, but after a day's washing they have a peculiarly soft, silky feeling, as far removed as is possible from the sensations produced by washing with ordinary washing compounds.—[Southern Cultivator. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, February 11, 1864, p. 3, c. 3
L. E. Welch, Druggist, Albany, Ga.  On hand and for sale the following articles:  . . . Castile Soap, Toilet Soap, . . . I make great effort to keep on hand every Drug and Medicine the community needs, and that the present state of the country affords.  Prescriptions carefully compounded. 
feb 11.                                                                                    L. E. Welch. 

NASHVILLE DAILY UNION, February 19, 1864

Soap Chapter.

                To Make Washing Soap.—One gallon soft water; 2 lbs. hard soap, made of palm or olive oil and soda ash; 4 oz. sal. soda; 2 oz. borax.  Put all in a clean kettle, bring to a gentle boiling, and in ten minutes put in three tablespoonfuls of burning fluid and two of hartshorn.  Simmer till well blended, then pour off.
               
How to Make Toilet or Shaving Soap.—One gallon water, 4 lbs. hard soap, as above, 2 oz. borax, 2 oz. sal soda.  Color with a teaspoonful of Chinese vermillion [sic], dissolved in two teaspoonfuls of warm water.  Streak through the mould, while warm, stirring in flavoring, also, at the same time.
               
To Make Transparent Soap.—Shave very fine the soap used.  Use the same soaps as above—Colgate & Co.'s Opodeldoc soap for the white, and common bar and chemical soap for the fine transparent.  Put best alcohol in a vessel deep enough to be safe on a stove.  When it begins to simmer, put in the shavings; 1 lb. of soap to 1 pint of alcohol, is all the soap the alcohol will cut; pour off as soon as dissolved.  Keep from fire.  If it should take fire, smother out.
               
To Make Honey Soap.—Shave and dissolve two pounds of yellow soap in a vessel suspended in boiling water.  Then add one-quarter pound of each of strained honey and palm oil, and three cents worth of the oil of cinnamon.  Useable when cold.
               
To Make One Barrel of Soft Soap into Two.—Put one barrel of soft water to a barrel of soap, and five lbs. sal soda, a half-pint of hartshorn, and a half-pint of burning fluid.  Green soaps must be kept from freezing; if frozen, melt over.
 

NASHVILLE DAILY UNION, March 1, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
                                                                                                                        
Daily Union Office,
                                                                                                             
Nashville, March 1st, 1864.
. . . Soap—German 12 1/2c per lb; Family 12½ c.
. . . Note.—The above are wholesale prices.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, March 3, 1864, p. 3, c. 3
. . . castile soap, toilet soap, . . . just received at the drugs store of L. E. Welch. march 3. 

MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], April 2, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
The retail variety store of Messrs. Fulcher & Co., on Whitehall street, between Alabama and Hunter, west side, is kept regularly replenished with almost every article demanded by the public wants, such as table ware, cutlery, pins and needles, pocket combs, stationery, pens and pencils, pocket handkerchiefs, socks, pipes, chewing tobacco, fine soaps, and in fact almost any article that can be called for.  Their arrangements are such that their show cases and shelves are kept full, and the wants of the public are particularly consulted.  Give them a call and examine their stock.  Their stand is opposite the store of D. Mayer. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, April 20, 1864, p. 1, c. 2
               
A Good Soap Recipe.--Pour 12 quarts of boiling water upon 5 pounds of unslacked lime; then dissolve 5 pounds of washing soda in 12 quarts of boiling water, mix the above together, and let the mixture remain together from 12 to 24 hours for the purpose of chemical action.  Now pour off all the clear liquid, being careful not to disturb the sediment, add to the liquid 3 1/2 pounds of clarified grease and from 3 to 4 ounces of rosin.  Boil the compound together one hour, pour off to cool, and the next day cut in bars for use.
 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, April 21, 1864, p. 3, c. 3
               
Refined Borax, Sal. Soda, Cooking Soda, Mustard, Toilet Soaps, Castile Soap; Black Pepper; Nutmegs; Cloves, Mace, &c. Apr 21.  For sale at L. E. Welch's Drug Store. 

CHARLESTON MERCURY, June 21, 1864, p. 1, c. 6
               
Cheap Soap--A correspondent of the Fayetteville (N.C.) Observer, says:  "A friend informs us that he obtained from he Observer a recipe for making the article which is worth a dozen years' subscription.  It is simply strong ley and rosin, boiled together, till of the proper consistency.  Not a particle of grease is necessary.  His family was thus supplied with an excellent soap all last year--excellent, as his own faultless shirt bosom showed.  If salt were not so dear, an addition of a proper proportion of that would make "bar turpentine soap."
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, June 29, 1864, p. 1, c. 5
                                                                                               
Head Qrs., Bureau of Conscription,
                                                                                               
Trans Mississippi Department,
                                                                                               
Marshall, Texas, June 9th, 1864.
General Orders No. 13.
               
I.  Manufacturers of iron, salt, wool or cotton cloth, soap or candles, who have been or may be detailed as such manufacturers, or to manage and superintend their factories, or who have had or may have conscripts or soldiers detailed as operators or employees in such factories, will be required to make affidavit that they will, during the continuance of their details, sell the articles produced or manufactured at their establishments at prices not exceeding those fixed by the Commissioners of the State under the Impressment  Act. . .
               
VII.  Any evasion of this order or of the provisions of General Order No. 11, either by refusal to perform work or to sell for Confederate money, or by obtaining provisions in exchange for work articles manufactured, or received by way of toll at prices below their customary market value in the neighborhood, or by exchanging work or articles manufactured or received for toll for provisions or supplies for re-sale, will be punished by prompt revocation of the detail.
               
VIII.  Upon proper application and satisfactory proof, one man will be detailed as superintendent to every manufactory of Salt, in which not less than 20 bushels are actually manufactured per day.  But such details will not be made to such manufactories as have superintendents not subject to military duty.  By command of
                                                                                                                          
Brig. Gen. Greer,
                                                                                                            
W. Stedman, A. A. General. 

MOBILE REGISTER AND ADVERTISER, July 2, 1864, p. 2, c. 5
               
It is no fanciful chimera of the brain, no wild mental hallucination, but a plain and simple fact, that we at last have a toilet soap manufactory in Mobile; a soap guaranteed in every sense of the word.  We have tried it, and unhesitatingly take great pleasure in giving it a hearty recommendation as a well perfumed No. 1 toilet soap, and consider it a duty of the people to extend to the firm of Cook & Dromgoole a liberal patronage so long as their soaps give satisfaction.  Their make of "Brown Windsor" is splendid, and if the ladies ever use such an article, we advise them to try it.  It can be found at No. 8 Water street, where it can be had wholesale and retail. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, July l7, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
Albany Prices.-- . . . Sugar, syrup, salt and soap are steady at good prices, with little evidences of decline.  The retail prices are, sugar $4.50 to $5.50, syrup $15 per gallon, salt 75 cents per lb, soft soap 50 cents, hard lye soap $1.25, and rosin soap $3.50 to $4 per lb; vinegar is worth from $3 to $5 per gallon. . . . 

BELLVILLE [TX] COUNTRYMAN, August 16, 1864, p. 1, c. 1
               
If people will not keep their hands and faces clean after reading the following, it is not our fault.  We therefore publish a receipt for making soap out of materials that can always be obtained in spite of the blockaders, and thus wash our hands from further responsibility:
               
First boil a ley [lye] from oak and hickory ashes, strong enough to eat a feather; put the ley into tubs until it settles, and then strain through a coarse towel.
               
Put about three gallons of this ley into a large wash kettle or pot, and after boiling a few minutes add eight pounds of clear lard; boil briskly four or five hours, adding frequently several gourds full of weak ley, until a good soap is made entirely free from grease.  Now draw the fire away from the pot and stir into the soap salt until the soap becomes thin and runs off of the paddle like buttermilk; it is then turned.  Put the fire under again, and after boiling the soap for fifteen minutes, pour into it about two quarts of weak brine, and take the pot immediately from the fire, the soap which will rise like foam to the top must be skimmed off immediately into wash-bowls.
               
You may then perfume it with oil of burgamot, cinnamon, lemon, sassafras, or any other perfume, as your taste directs.  It may be colored by stirring into it a small quantity of vermillion, Spanish brown or Venetian red—I use vermillion.
               
If you desire to marble the soap, you must mix the coloring matter with only a small portion of the soap and after pouring a thin layer of white soap into the mould, stripe it over with the color, again pour on white, color again, pour on white, color again, and so on until the pan is full.  I use stove pans for moulding, and when hard, cut it by the square into cakes of desirable size; let these dry for about a week, then smooth them off with a plane.  The trimmings may all be melted and moulded over so that nothing will be wasted.—Telegraph. 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], September 7, 1864, p. 3, c. 6
For the Ladies--Brown Windsor Soap, Chalk, Lily White, Tooth Brushes, Dressing Combs, Scissors, Knitting Pins, Thimbles, etc. etc.     I. M. Kenney,
                                                                                               
Next door above Bank of Athens.
Sept. 7 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, October 13, 1864, p. 3, c. 2
Soaps of all kinds.  Toilet soap, Castile soap, shaving soap, bar soap, dressing combs, fine combs, tooth brushes, toilet powder, tooth powder, knives, genuine Mason's blacking.  For sale at L. E. Welch's drug store.  Sept. 8th, 1864.
Spices, Pepper, &c.  Black pepper, spice, mace, cloves, starch, soda, cream tartar, sperm candles, soaps, mustard, matches &c.  L. E. Welch. Sept. 8th, 1864. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
More New Goods at Welch's Drug Store, for Family Use.  Fine green tea, black pepper, spice, cloves, mace, soda, sperm candles, bar soap, Bro. Windsor soap, toilet soaps, starch, mustard, &c., &c.  L. E. Welch.  Albany, Nov. 10, 1864.
Sundries.  Fine cologne, hair oils, Bos. Rum, dressing combs, fine combs, tooth brushes, tooth powders, razors, shaving soap, Mason's blacking, oil paste blacking, Spaulding's glue, wax matches, pocket knives, Lilly [sic] white, &c, &c.  L. E. Welch.  Albany, Nov. 10, 1864. 

DALLAS HERALD, November 26, 1864, p. 2, c. 4
               
We were called upon Saturday to witness the operation of a very ingenious machine for braiding or plaiting candle wick, invented and made by Ralph Hooker and Baker Jamison, of this city.  It braids three strands with great rapidity and evenness, and is a curiosity worth looking at.  The ingenuity of these mechanics is well known to our citizens.  This machine will prove one of the most useful of their inventions, furnishing a self-consuming candle wick, hitherto a great disideratum [sic] in domestic candle-making.  We believe Frank Fabj, of the Houston Soap and Candle Factory, has secured this machine.—Houston Tel. 14th. 

AUSTIN STATE GAZETTE, December 21, 1864, p. 2, c. 5

New Goods!

The subscribers have just received the following assortment of Dry Goods and Groceries, which they will sell for Confederate money, State Warrants, or specie--
White blankets, grey blankets, men's shoes, ladies' shoes, boys' shoes, childrens' shoes, grey cloth, blue satinett, grey satinett, bleached domestic, blue denims, brown domestic, cotton cards, gents drab hats, matches, gents blk hats, calico, nutmegs, gum camphor, spice, white sugar, coffee, brown sugar, candles, cream tartar, tea, white beans and toilette soap.

                                                                                                                     
Sampson & Henricks.
Austin, December 21st,'64.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, December 28, 1864, p. 2, c. 7
               
Holiday Gifts.—Books, for all ages.  Perfumery, Cologne, Fancy Soaps, Pictures, Gold Pens, Fine Cutlery, Fancy Inkstands, &c., &c.
                                                                                                               
James Burke.
 

GALVESTON WEEKLY NEWS, January 11, 1865, p. 1, c. 5

Soap—Soap—Government Soap.

                                                                                                           Bolivar Point, Jan. 8th, 1865.
               
Ed. News:--Knowing that it is not your habit to soft-soap government officials, agents and contractors, and that you are always ready to expose frauds on the government and the soldiery.  I would call your attention to one that is being perpetrated on both by the contractor for supplying soap to this and other commands within the defences of Galveston.  Soap is a great institution, without it the world would soon relapse into the unwashed barbarism of early times; the social status; the intellectual and moral purity or every nation, community and family, may be reckoned by the amount of its consumption.  Our present civilization to a great extent may be attributed to its humanizing and elevating influence.  It has its evils too, particularly soft soap, and by its lavish expenditure contracts are received by which the government is defrauded and the soldier robbed of his rights.  We have never known a man who habitually wore a dirty shirt that was not proverbial for cowardice.  We fear its demoralizing influence on the military.  In the article furnished by the contractor referred to so far as our experience and tests extend, we have been unable to discover that it possesses any of the qualities of soap.  In appearance it resembles a substance procured from boiling beef shanks.  With the necessary ingredients, sherry wine and loaf sugar, it might make excellent jelly—without them it is perfectly worthless.
               
We presume the contractor is making quite a good thing out of his contract.  If he expects to come out with clean hands we would advise him not to rely on his own soap.  We have tried it and the more we wash the fouler our hands become and in the end it involves a considerable outlay of a better article to get rid of it.
               
We would suggest to the quartermaster, as an item of economy to the government that he suspend the further issue of the article, until the sherry and sugar can be procured.  It can then be issued as a ration of jelly in lieu of others he has been unable to supply.
                                                                                                                               
Sentinel. 

SOUTHERN BANNER [ATHENS, GA], January 25, 1865, p. 1, c. 2
To Make Toilet Soap.--Take the common country soap, cut it up in a plenty of water, as soon as it boils, throw in a handful of salt, and then strain through a cloth to free it from grit; do this two or there times, until the ley [lye] which settles at the bottom has lost its strength, then melt it (without water) and scent with some of the essential oil, or a cake or two of highly perfumed soap.  Pour into cups or any other shaped mould to cool.  When properly made this is far better for the skin than most of the soap we buy. 

SOUTHERN WATCHMAN [ATHENS, GA], January 25, 1865, p. 1, c. 5
               
To Make Toilet Soap.--Take common country soap, cut it up in a plenty of water; as soon as it boils, throw in a handful of salt, and then strain through a cloth to free it from grit; do this two or three times, until the ley [lye] which settles at the bottom has lost its strength, then melt it without water, and scent it with some of the essential oils, or a cake or two of highly perfumed soap.  A little honey is a great improvement to it.  Pour it into cups or any other shaped mould to cool.  When properly made, this is far better for the skin than most of the soap we buy. 

ALBANY [GA] PATRIOT, March 2, 1865, p. 1, c. 2
To make Toilet Soap.--Take common country soap, cut it up in a plenty of water; as soon as it boils throw in a handful of salt, and then strain through a cloth to free it from grit; do this two or three times, until the ley [lye] which settles at the bottom has lost its strength, then [illegible] it without water, and scent it with some of the essential oils, or a cake or two of highly perfumed soap.  A little honey is a great improvement to it.  Pour it into cups or any other shaped mould to cool.  When properly made this is far better for the skin than most of the soap we buy.