TYLER REPORTER
1855-1860
(Scattered issues, covered in depth on local items) 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, masthead
"The only Amarathine flower on earth is Virtue; the only lasting treasure, Truth."
Jack Davis, Editor; Selman & Davis, Proprietors
vol. 1, no. 16 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 1

Tyler Reporter.
Published Every Wednesday Morning.

            TERMS:--$2.50 per annum, if paid in advance, or $3.50 at the expiration of the year.
           
No subscription will be discontinued until all the arrearages are paid.
           
Ten copies, if paid for at one time, will be sent to any one post-office for Twenty Dollars, or five copies for Eleven Dollars and Twenty-five Cents.
           
All Postmasters are Authorized to act as Agents, and deduct ten per cent. on moneys they remit.
           
All letters sent to this office must be pre-paid.

Rates of Advertising.

            One Dollar per square for the first insertion, and Fifty Cents for each subsequent insertion.  Eight lines or less to constitute a square.
           
To Merchants and others, who advertises by the year, a reasonable deduction from the above rates will be made.
           
Professional, or business cards of ten lines or less                     $10.00
           
Announcing candidates for S. Off's,                                            10.00
                       
"            "                       Co. "                                          5.00

THE LAW OF NEWSPAPERS.

            1.  All subscribers who do not give express notice to the contrary, are considered as wishing to continue their subscription.
           
2.  If subscribers order the discontinuance of their papers, publisher may continue to send them until arrearages are paid.
           
3.  If subscribers neglect or refuse to take their papers from the post-office to which they are sent, they are held responsible until their bills are settled and their papers ordered to be discontinued.
           
Judge Thompson, of Indiana, decided recently, "That where a subscriber to a periodical failed to notify the editor to discontinue the paper, at the end of the time to which he subscribed, or pay up the arrearages, he was bound for another year.

JOB PRINTING.

            We have on hand a large assortment of JOB TYPE which enables us to execute with Neatness and Despatch [sic], Plain and Fancy Work.

BLANKS

            Deeds of the most approved form, got up in a superior style,

ALSO,

            Blanks of every description, printed to order on the shortest notice. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 1

PROFESSIONAL CARDS.

Tho. J. Johnson,

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW, Rusk, Texas.  Will practice in the Courts of the Sixth Judicial District of the State of Texas.  Particular attention paid to the collection of all claims entrusted to his care.
Dec. 13, 1854.                                                                                                 1yv1n15

F. W. Bowdon,                            G. W. Chilton,

BOWDON & CHILTON, Attorneys at Law, will attend promptly to all business entrusted to their care in the Supreme Court, and the United States District Court held at Tyler for the Eastern Division of Texas, and also in the Courts of the sixth and ninth Judicial Districts.
sept. 6, 1854                                                                                                    tfv1n1   

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 1

ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES OF MAILS.

            Marshall mail leaves Tyler Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at 1 o'clock, P. M., and arrives Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at 11 o'clock, A.M.
           
Nacogdoches mail leaves Tyler Saturday and Wednesday, at 6 o'clock A.M., and arrives Sunday and Wednesday, at 6 o'clock P.M.
           
Palestine mail leaves Tyler on Saturday and Tuesday, at 6 o'clock A.M. and arrives on Monday and Thursday, at 6 o'clock, P.M.
           
Kemp mail leaves Tyler on Monday at 6 o'clock, A.M. and arrives Saturday at 6 o'clock, P.M.
           
Tarrant mail leaves Tyler Monday at 6 o'clock, A.M., and arrives on Saturday 5 o'clock P.M.
           
Shelbyville mail arrives at Tyler on Sunday at 12 o'clock, and leaves the same day at 1 o'clock, P.M.
           
Athens mail leaves Tyler on Saturday at 6 o'clock A.M., and arrives on Sunday at 7 o'clock, P.M.
           
N.B.—The mails may be closed one half hour before the time of departure, therefore deposit early as possible.
                                               
                                    H. M. MASTERS, P.M. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 1
           
An old toper was overheard the other day advising a young man to get married, "Because my boy, you'll have somebody to pull off your boots when you go home drunk. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 6
           
THE SIMINOLES [SIC] IN ARKANSAS.—The Van Buren (Ark.) Intelligencer speaks as follows of the dissatisfaction which prevails among the Siminoles [sic] on the Arkansas frontier:
           
These indians [sic] were sent west and settled on the lands of the Creek Indians.  A treaty was formed in 1845, to which the United States and the Creeks were parties with the Siminoles, under which they lived peaceably for several years, but Wild Cat, a well known Siminole, became dissatisfied at being ruled by the Creeks, gathered a party of Siminoles and negroes, and crossed into Mexico, where he has lived as an outlaw ever since.  The same feeling has grown with the remnant of the tribes in the Indian territory, who have lately withdrawn from the Creek Council, and have held one among themselves for the purpose of throwing off the Creek yoke demanding a partition of the lands, that they may set up for themselves independently.  They are on Creek lands, and by treaty are subject to the Creek laws, but they are dissatisfied and restless and bent upon a change.  There are the materials there for a harassing Indian disturbance, unless the Government interferes wisely and in time. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 6
           
A DELICATE WAY TO ADVERTISE FOR A HUSBAND.—We extract from an English paper the following racy advertisement, which considering it is from a young lady, comes to the point:
           
Wanted—By a young lady, aged nineteen, and agreeable manners, general information and varied accomplishments, who has studied everything from the creation to crochet, a situation in the family of a gentleman.  She will take the head of the table, manage his household, and scold his servants, nurse his babies, (when they arrive), check his tradesman's bills, accompany him to the theatre, cut the leaves of his new books, sew on his buttons, warm his slippers, and generally make his life happy.—Apply in the first place by letter to Louisa Caroline, Linden Grove, and afterwards to papa, upon the premises.  Wedding ring No. 4, small. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 7
           
"We think," says the Frankford [sic] Yeoman, "that it is perfectly rediculous [sic] and unmanly in certain editors to keep sneering at and carping at low-necked dresses.  The fact is, the ladies were driven to the present fashion in self-defence and vindication and by the impertinent course of these meddling editors.  When editors were continually insinuating that the ladies—dear creatures—in fortifying their flinty little hearts against the assaults of Cupid, adopted the mode of defence used by General Jackson at the battle of New Orleans, we always believed the insinuation was a vile slander, and now we know it was." 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 7
           
Anyone who supposes that locking a girl in a back room, will prevent her from knowing what love means, might as well undertake to keep strawberries from blushing in June by whispering in their ears about the snow we had last winter. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 1, c. 7
           
Woman's Rights—A good natured husband, a dozen children, and a happy home. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 1

SUNDRIES.

20 Sacks Coffee, 300 lbs. Powder, Duponts best.  40 ps. Kerseys, 200 yds Osnaburgs, 4 cases best Russets.  Just received and for sale by                    Wilson & Ersin. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 1

Notice.

Taken up by John Hanner and posted before J. P. Ratcliff, Esq., on the 14th day of April, 1855.  One sorrell mare, about five years old, 14 hands high.  Right hind foot white above the paster, some saddle and hobble marks, a wart over the left eye.  Appraised at sixty dollars.
           
Witness, my hand at Athens, April 14th, A. D. 1855.
                                               
                                                J. M. Trimble, c. c. h. co.
                                               
                                                            3wv1n28 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 1

Stephen Reaves.

ATTORNEY AT LAW, will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Court, or the Eastern District of Texas.  Office, at Tyler.
sept. 5, 1854.                                                                                       tfv1n1 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 1
State of Texas            }                      J. T. Beall,
                                
}                           vs.
Smith County            }                      Wm. J. Chapman
           
To the Sheriff or other lawful officer of said County Greeting:
           
You are hereby commanded to summons Wm J. Chapman by publication in the Tyler Reporter a paper published the town of Tyler Smith co., three successive weeks to be and appear before me at my office in Jamestown on the first Saturday of Nov. 1855 by 10 o'clock of said day, to answer the complaint of J. T. Beall in a plea of debt due by note for Sixty-five dollars and eighty-one cents, said Beall having filed his affidavit before me, stating that the said Wm. J. Chapman has absconded or secreted himself so that the ordinary process of law cannot be served on him.  Herein fail not and due return make as directed by law, given under my hand and seal.
                                               
                                                Samuel Pinkerton, J. P.
           
Oct 17th 1855. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 1

HOLMAN HOUSE,
TYLER TEXAS,
WM. S. CALDWELL, Proprietor.

            This new spacious, and well adopted Hotel has just been refurnished and refitted in the most approved and elegant style.  Well trained servants act under the constant supervision of the proprietor.  The table is abundantly supplied, with whatever either money can procure, or the market afford.
           
An excellent Livery Stable is attached, with attentive hostlers.
           
October 17, 1855.                                                                   [12:1y] 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 1

NEW LIVERY STABLE,
TYLER, TEXAS.

            Having purchased the commodious, convenient, and well adapted buildings, recently occupied by Mr. T. J. Putty the undersigned begs leave to inform the public, that he will be able, at all times, to keep on hand a full supply of every variety of provender for horses, that the country affords.  He will soon have, and will keep a number of horses and buggies to hire.
           
A liberal share of patronage is solicited, and together with experience and attentive hostlers, he will always be on hand to send customers.  Prices moderate.
                                               
                                                            J. E. POTTER.
           
Sign of the Livery Stable, North side of the Public Square. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 1

NO EXCUSE FOR BAD BREAD.

Superior Yeast Powder, Preston & Merrill's infallible Yeast Powder for sale by
                                               
                                                Wilson & Erwin.
Castings, 1400 lbs. for sale by                                                  Wilson & Erwin. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2-3

JOHN W. WILSON                                             AUGUSTUS O. ERWIN.
WILSON & ERWIN.
(South-west Corner, Public Square,)
Tyler, Texas.
Dealers in Staple and Fancy Dry Goods and Groceries.

            Ready made Clothing, Hats, caps, bonnets, Boots, Shoes, Hardware, Cutlery, Glassware, Queensware, Woodware, Tinware, Saddlery, Window shades, School and miscellaneous Books, Drugs, Window-glass, Oils, Paints, Dye-stuffs, &c &c.
           
Together with a general assortment of every article found in a retail store.  For sale at the lowest market prices and to which we must respectfully invite the attention of the citizens of Smith and adjoining counties. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2
Notice—To Mr. John or Samuel West, and all the other heirs of Martin Martz, deceased, of Rockingham county, Virginia.  You are hereby notified, that according to the will of Martin Martz, deceased, of Rockingham county, Va., I am required to advertise you of the fact that the assets of the estate in my hands will be distributed within two years from the 30th of April, 1855, that if your interest in said estate be not called for within that time, it will be divided equally amongst the other heirs.  You will therefore please make application at once, as I am anxious to settle the affairs of the estate.
                                               
                                                Reuben Moore, Ex'or
                                               
                                    of the Estate of Martin Martz, dec'd.
Sept. 12, 12, 1855                                                                3t. [Printer's fee, $6
           
All the papers in Texas will please copy the above three times, and mark cost, and forward papers containing the advertisement and accounts to the office of the Rockland Register and Virginia Advertiser, Harrisonburg, Va., for payment. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2

Dr. J. H. Warren.

Offers his professional services to the public and hopes to merit a continuance of patronage so liberally bestowed.  He will at all times be found at his office on the South side of public square when not professional engaged.
                                               
                                                            2avin241y. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2

Dr. H. Lindsey.

Offers his professional services to the citizens of Tyler and vicinity, thankful for past patronage, he respectfully asks a continuance of the same.  He will at all times, when not professionally absent, be found at his office.
           
Office on South side of the square, at the Drug Store of Ellis & Bro.
Jan. 24, 1855.                                                                                      17v1n20 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2

Fashionable Tailoring Establishment
Hockersmith & Cornelius.

            The Undersigned would respectfully inform the citizens of Tyler and vicinity that they have opened a

Tailoring Establishment.

in the house formerly occupied by Masters & Breese on North side public square where he is prepared to execute all orders which may be entrusted to him, he flatters himself that he is competent to please the most fastidious.  Where suits do not fit, new cloth will be replaced, and try it again.
                                               
                                                J. W. Cornelius.
                                               
                                                J. Hockersmith. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2

ADMINISTRATOR'S SALE.

            On the first Tuesday in January next I will offer for sale to the highest bidder in cash, before the Court House door in the town of Tyler all the lands [illegible] estate of Abram Bess decd.  Also [illegible] negro woman, aged about thirty years.  Sold by order of the court for purposes of distribution.
                                               
                                                A. W. Stroud, Admr.
           
Oct. 17th '55 6w. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2

FOR SALE!
31,000!  Thirty-one Thousand

Acres of Land, lying in Smith county, near the town of Tyler.  There are fifty-two improved places on said land, ranging from 25 to 100 acres, each in cultivation.  Good land, timber and water.  The above lands will be sold in tracts to suit purchasers.  Terms:  part cash, the balance on one and two years credit, with interest.  Also, 8000 acres lying in Cherokee county near Jacksonville and Larissa.  There are several improved places on the 8000 acres, ranging from 40 to 80 acres, each in cultivation.  Also one league lying in Angelina county, which will be sold on the above terms.  For further particulars, apply to
                                               
                                                James McFadin, Tyler
           
Sept. 5th, 1855                                                                                  3mv1n10 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2

Steam Mill.

            The undersigned thankful for the patronage so liberally extended to them for the past years, beg leave to inform their friends and the public generally, that they are prepared to fill all bills and orders for lumber with promptness and dispatch.  We will sell for cash or approved credit on the following terms:

BOARD MEASURE.
For cash.

All square lumber                                                                                $1.25
Oak and Gum                                                                                       2.00
Ripped lumber                                                                                      1.00
Sheeting                                                                                                 .75

On credit to 1st of Jan. 1856.

All square lumber                                                                                $1.50
Oak and Gum                                                                                       2.25
Ripped lumber                                                                                      1.12½
Sheeting                                                                                                 .87½
           
P. S.—An extra charge for pailings and lumber over 22 feet long.
                                               
                                    B. F. Thompson & sons.
           
Calhoun, Rusk Co., Texas, Feb. 7, 1855.
                                               
                                                            26wv1n23 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 2
Window Glass, 12 Boxes Window Glass, for sale by                    Wilson & Erwin.
White Lead, 600 lbs. Pure White Lead in Store and for sale by     Wilson & Erwin. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 3

Male Department.
Tyler University.

            The next regular session of the Male Department of Tyler University will commence on Monday the 29th January 1856.  The Scholastic year will be divided into two sessions, of five months each.
           
Students will be received at any time and charged to the close of the current session.  Deductions will be made for protracted illness, if promptly reported to the Principal.

Rates of Tuition and
Course of Studies.
Primary Department

Tuition per Session                                                                                         $8.00
           
Orthography, Reading, and Child's Arithmetic

Preparatory Department

1st Class, Tuition per Session                                                                         $12 00
           
Orthography, Reading and Arithmetic continued.  Elementary principles of Geography, and English Grammar.
2d Class Tuition per Session                                                                          $14.00
           
Mental and written Arithmetic, English Grammar, and Geography continued, Hist. of U. S., and English Composition.

Collegiate Course.

1st Class, Tuition per session.                                                                         $18.00
           
Arithmetic with a radical analysis of the same, English Grammar, Hist. of Greece and Rome, Rhetoric (Newmans) Natural philosophy, first lessons in Algebra and Latin.
2d Class, Tuition per session                                                                          $20.00
           
Elocution, Chemistry, Moral Philosophy, Algebra (Days), Geometry, Surveying, Latin and Greek.
3d Class, Tuition per session                                                                          $20.00
           
Natural Philosophy (Olmsteads), Chemistry (Silliman's), Geometry, Trigonometry, (plane, solid and spherical), Surveying, Conic sections, Intellectual Philosophy, Greek and Latin.
4th Class, Tuition per session                                                                         $20.00
           
Astronomy (illegible), Evidences of Christianity (illegible), Elements of Christianity (illegible), Botany, Geology, Butlers Analogy, (illegible0 Economy, (Waylands), International Law, Greek and Latin.
           
Incidental expenses for each student per session                                   $1.00
           
[illegible] require two sessions to complete [illegible] Collegiate course, consequently [illegible] years will be necessary to its [illegible].  If found expedient other [illegible] introduced during the course of instruction.
           
A regular course will be strictly adhered to unless by request of the parent or guardian, in which case any student may enter irregularly by paying the rates of the next higher class.  No student will be permitted to rise to a higher class unless found competent by strict examination.
           
Tuition will be due at the close of each session.  Ten per cent will be deducted for tuition paid in advance, and the same per cent will be charged on accounts not promptly paid when due.
           
Discipline mild, but strict.
           
Liberal patronage is respectfully solicited of the people, both in the vicinity of Tyler and at a distance.
                                               
                                                J. J. Carter, Principal. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 5

Tyler University.

            The next Session of this Institution will open on Monday the 3rd day of September next.  The scholastic year will be thrown into two sessions of five months each.  We take pleasure in returning our gratitude to our former patrons and friends, and will here renew our pledges that nothing will be left undone upon our part, nor any expense or pains spared to meet the very highest expectations.  To effect, we shall endeavor to have an able faculty, and also give our personal and constant attention to the Institution.
           
Students will be received at any time and charged to the close of the current session.
           
Deductions will made for protracted illness promptly reported to the President.
           
N.B.—Ten per cent discount will be made on all Tuition bills paid in advance.—Ten per cent will be charged on all bills not paid or settled by note at the close of each session.
                                               
                                                G. G. Baggerly.
                                               
                                                            President.

Faculty.

G. G. Baggerly, Prest. & Principal,
Mrs. S. G. Baggarly, First Assistant,
                       
                        Second Assistant.

John J. Carter, (elect) Male Depart.
B. L. Walker, First Assistant.
                       
                        Second Assistant.

Rates of Tuition

and course of study for the Female Depart.

Primary Department.

            Tuition                                                                                      $8.00
           
Orthography, Reading, Enumeration, Childs Arithmetic.

Preparatory Department.

            1st Division, Tuition                                                                 $12.00
           
Orthography continued first class Arithmetic, Reading con.    "    Geography.

Preparatory Department

            2d. Division, Tuition                                                                $12.00
           
Mental Arithmetic, Written Arithmetic, English Grammar, Geography with Atlas, drawing of maps, History of U.S.

Collegiate Department

            Junior Class, Tuition                                                                  $18.00
           
Arithmetic, Grammar, History of Greece, Hist. of Rome, Botany, Rhetoric, Natural Philosophy, Mental Philosophy.

            Middle Class, Tuition                                                                $20.00
           
Elocution, Chemistry, Mental Philosophy, Logic, Algebra, Greek, Latin, French or Spanish
           
Sub-Senior Class, Tuition,                                                         $20.00
           
Chemistry, Astronomy, History, Geometry, Logic, Greek, Latin, French or Spanish
           
Senior Class, Tuition                                                                  $20.00
           
English Classics, Geometry, Triganometry [sic], Geology, Political Economy, Domestic Economy, Moral Science, Evidences of Christianity, Greek, Latin, French or Spanish.

Extra Charges.

            Music,                                                                                      $25.00
           
Painting and Drawing,                                                                 10.00
           
Penmanship, Defining and Biblical Reading, will be continued during the session. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 6

Estray Notice.

            The State of Texas vs. County of Van Zandt.—Taken up, by Jacob Weaver and estrayed before J. R. C. Henderson, J.P. on the 29th day of June 1855, two work Oxen; one is red and white speckled, marked a smooth crop and under half crop in each ear.  Brand "D" on the left him; also "31" on the right hip, and about eight years old.  The other is a red steer, marked a swallow fork and underbit in the left ear about ten years old, and no brands.  Said animals appraised to fifty dollars.
                                               
                                    J. R. C. Henderlon, c.c.c.vz co.
           
Aug. 15, 1855 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 6

Prospectus of
The Tyler Reporter.

            This paper will be published weekly at the price of $2.50 per annum, if paid in advance, $3.00 if paid within six months and $3.50 if paid after that time.
           
No subscriber taken out of the county, unless payment is made in advance.
           
Subscribers can remit money by mail at our risk, taking the receipt of the postmaster, that the money has been sent.
           
Our subscribers are aware that we have been, for some weeks past, publishing the decisions of the Supreme Court.  We shall continue to do so, and promise that no pains shall be spared to publish them correctly.
           
In national politics, the "Reporter" will be strictly democratic, and we shall use our best exertions to have our government administered upon those principles.
           
Useful information upon all subjects will find an ample space in our columns; indeed it is our great aim to make the "Reporter" a valuable paper to all classes of our citizens. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 6

Drug and Book Store in Tyler Texas.

            G. L. Ellis & Bro., would respectfully inform Physicians, Teachers and citizens in Smith and surrounding counties that they keep constantly on hand all the leading and best Medicines and a variety of the most approved Theological, School, Medical and Miscellaneous Books all of which they offer as low as the market will justify.  They have also a considerable variety of the most approved Patent Medicines for cash only.  Thankful to a generous public for past favors, they still hope to receive a liberal share of their patronage.  Our Medicines are tasted [sic?  tested?] and purchased in one of the best markets in the East.  Ours is a good selection.  Ladies and gentlemen give us a call.
                                               
                                                            G. L. Ellis & Bro.
           
sept 6, 1854                                                                                        tfv1n1 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 6

FURNITURE MANUFACTURE.

            The undersigned begs leave to inform the citizens of Tyler and vicinity, he has opened a

HOUSE FURNITURE ESTABLISHMENT

where he is prepared to executed [sic] all orders which may be intrusted [sic] to him, he flatters himself that he is competent to please the most fastidious with his workmanship, his Shop is on the South side of Public Square.
                                               
                                                C. N. Sonneksen.
Dec. 3, 1854                                                                                                    2wv1n11 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 7

Saw Mill.
By James W. & Thos. D. Wilson.

            The subscribers would respectfully inform the citizens of Smith and the public generally, that they have a Saw Mill, seven miles Northeast of Starrville, on Sandy, Upshur county, where they are ready to fill all orders with promptness and despatch for lumber which may be sent them, and would respectfully invite an examination of their lumber.

Terms:
Board Measure.

All square lumbers                                                                                                $1.25
Sheeting                                                                                                                   .70
Green birch, &c.                                                                                                     2.00
Ripped lumber (pine)                                                                                              1.50
           
Bills of lumber filled as long as twenty-five feet. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 7

Architect and Builder.

            Mr. Hudson, late of Georgia, would respectfully inform the citizens of Tyler and vicinity that he will contract to the erection of the following branches of the mechanics art viz:  Cotton and Woolen Factories, Sugar Mills, and also for the erection of Churches, Court Houses or the first class Dwelling houses, together with Stores and Warehouses, all to be of the most modern style.  All contracts filled with despatch and warranted not to be surpassed by any artist for the amount of money paid.
           
Jan. 24, 1855                                                                                        1yv1n20 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 7

Look Out.

            We the undersigned have this day bought the entire stock of Goods that D. S. Nance owned, in the town of Starrville, and will continue to sell goods at the same place, under the firm name and style of J. W. and P. Nance.  Those wishing to purchase are respectfully invited to call and examining our goods before purchasing elsewhere.
                                               
                                                            J. W. & P. Nance.
Starrville, March, 1855.                                                                           tfv1n28 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 7
           
Notice.—Letters testamentary with the will annexed, were granted to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Smith county, at the April term, 1855, on the estate of John Tipps, deceased.  All persons having claims against said estate, are requested to present them within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted to said estate, will please call and settle.
                                               
                                    Geo. W. Bates, Executor.
           
May 53, '55. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 17, 1855, p. 2, c. 7

B. T. Selman                                                    R. B. Hubbard.

SELMAN & HUBBARD, Tyler, Smith county, Texas.  Have this day associated in the practice of law, and will attend to any business in the several courts at Tyler and in the District Courts of the adjacent counties, in the sixth and ninth Judicial District.
Jan. 8, 1855. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 9, 1859, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler
Reporter,
Published Every Wednesday
S. M. Warner, Editor.

            Terms:--$2.50 per annum, if paid in advance, or 3.50 at the expiration of the year.
           
No subscription shall be discontinued until all the arrearages are paid.
           
Ten copies, if paid for at one time, will be sent to one post-office for Twenty Dollars, or five copies for Eleven dollars and Twenty-five cents.
           
All Post Masters are authorized to act as Agents, and deduct ten per cent, on moneys they remit.
           
Mr. James Seeton, is our authorized agent at Jamestown, Smith county, to receive and receipt for subscriptions. . . . 

TYLER REPORTER, February 9, 1859, p. 1, c. 1

Professional Cards.

Geo. W. Chilton                                     J. F. Warren.
Chilton & Warren,

Will practice as Attorneys at Law, in the counties composing the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts in the State of Texas, and also in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler, or any other Courts of the State where the importance of the case will justify them in leaving their immediate Districts.
           
Address the firm at Tyler, Texas.
           
March 17, 1858—v3n28 

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

            Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
           
Tyler, Smith County, Texas, June 17th, 1858.
                                               
                                                            v1n46-tf 

Stanley W. Jones,
Attorney and Counsellor [sic]
At Law;
Tyler Smith Co, Texas.

            Will practice in all the Courts of Smith County, also in the District Courts of Rusk, Cherokee, Houston, Anderson, Henderson, Kaufman, Van Zandt and Nacogdoches Counties, and in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler.
           
Particular attention paid to Collecting, Land and Probate business.
           
Office on the North West Corner of the Public Square, over the Brick Drug Store. 

Richard B. Hubbard,
Attorney & Counsellor [sic] at Law
Tyler, Smith County, Texas.

            Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial District, and in the Supreme Court at Tyler, also in the United States District Courts at Austin and Tyler.
           
Office on the west side Public square, in building adjoining the Eagle Hotel.
                                               
                                                            v2n471y 1857 

D. W. Crow,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Smith County, Texas. 

Stephen Reaves,
           
Attorney at Law, will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Court, of the Western District of Texas.  Office, at Tyler.
           
sept 6, 1854                                                                            tfv1n1 

S. G. Smith.                                          S. L. Earle.
Smith &  Earle,
Attorney at Law.
Tyler, Smith Co., Texas.

            Will practice in the Supreme Court and the United States Courts at Tyler, and also in the District and other Courts, of Smith county.  Business entrusted to their hands will receive prompt attention.                                                                      v2n41,1y&ff 

Jack Davis
Attorney and Counsellor [sic] at Law,
Tyler, Smith County, Texas.

Will practice in all the Courts of the Ninth Judicial District. 

B. T. Selman
Attorney at Law.

            Will endeavor to give satisfaction to those entrusting business to his care in the various duties of the profession.
                                               
                                                Tyler, Smith County, Texas. 

Dr. John H. Warren,

            Announces to the citizens of Smith county that he will continue the practice of Medicine.  Midwifery and diseases of women and children will, as usual, receive his particular attention.
           
He is prepared with an excellent collection of Surgical instruments, and his uniform success in that branch of his profession is his sufficient recommendation.
           
A residence of several years in this county, during which time he has devoted himself to the arduous duties of his calling, induces him to cordially expect a liberal patronage. 

Doctor Wiley Yarbrough,
Having Permanently Located in
Tyler, Smith County, Texas,
Offers His
Professional Services to the Public.

            He will devote his whole attention to the different branches of his profession, and may be found at his office, on the North side of the Public Square, next door to the store of George Yarbrough, unless professionally absent. 

Davenport & Goodman,
Physicians & Surgeons,
Tyler, Texas

            Will promptly answer to all calls in the line of their profession.  They have formed a partnership for the practice of Medicine & Surgery, and will be found at all times unless professionally absent, at the Drug store of Davenport & Co., in the brick building on the northwest corner of the Public Square.
           
The attention of both will be given in all cases when necessary without additional charge.
                                               
                                                Jo. W. Davenport, M. D.
                                               
                                                Wm. J. Goodman, M. D. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 9, 1859, p. 1, c. 3

The Printer.

            The Printer is the most curious being living.  He may have a BANK and COINS, and not worth a cent; have SMALL CAPS and have neither wife nor children.—Others may run fast but he gets along swifter by SETTING fast.  He may be making IMPRESSIONS, without eloquence; but he may be using the LYE without offending, and be telling the truth; while others cannot STAND while they SET, he can SET STANDING, and do both at the same time; have to use FURNITURE, and yet have no dwelling; he may make up and put away PI, and never see a pie, much less eat it, during his whole life; be a human being and a RAT at the same time; may PRESS a great deal and not ask a favor; may handle a SHOOTING IRON, and know nothing about a cannon, or pistol; he may move the LEVER that turns the world and yet be as far from moving the globe as a hog under a mole-hill; spread his SHEETS without a house wife; he may lay his FORM on a BED, and yet be obliged to sleep on the floor; he may use the DAGGER without shedding blood, and from the earth he may handle the STARS; he may be of a ROLLING disposition, and yet never desire to travel; he may have a SHEEP'S FOOT and never be deformed; never without a CASE, and knows nothing of law or physics; be always CORRECTING his ERRORS, and growing worse every day; have EMBRACES without having the arms of a lass thrown around him; have his FORM LOCKED UP, and at the same time be free from jail, watch-house, or any other confinement; his office may have a HELL in it, and not be a bad place after all; he might be plagued by the DEVIL, and be a Christian of the best kind; and which is stranger still, be honest, rich or poor, drunk or sober, industrious or lazy, he always STANDS up to his business. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 9, 1859, p. 1, c. 3
           
"Oh, Johnny," cried a nervous mother, "do have some pity on my poor head!  Can't you play without shouting so?"  Poor Johnny threw up the tape reins with which he was driving two chairs tandem, and called out in a loud hoarse whisper, "Get up, whoa!"  But at length finding little pleasure in this suppressed amusement he threw down the reins, and laying his hand on his breast, said, with a long breath, "Oh mother, it's full of noise in here, and it hurts me to keep it!  Don't all little boys make a noise when they play?"  "Yes, Johnny, I believe they all do," replied the lady.  "Oh, then, mother dear," cried Johnny in a whining tone, "please let me be a little boy!" 

TYLER REPORTER, February 9, 1859, p. 1, c. 3

Dancing.

            The following which we find in the Boston Courier, conveys our own sentiments, as to the morality of this graceful and elegant amusement.  There is as much difference between the dance, as conducted in a respectable parlor or well regulated assembly-room, and the same in a Five-Point dance house, as there is between the innocent laugh of childhood and the ribald jest of age.  'Tis not the mere act of motion, but the associations of place, that are demoralizing.  Nature is not always in tears, and man is occasionally permitted to laugh and be merry:
           
"Promiscuous dancing" is, in itself, not only no sin, but an innocent pleasure and a healthful exercise—one of the natural and universal expressions of that delight in being alive, which is the blessed boon of youth and health.  That man must have an essentially low and vulgar mind who can look upon a group of youths and maidens, moving with light hearts and light feet through the giddy mazes of the dance, and stain the fair vision with thoughts of sense and sin.  This removing of the landmarks of morality—this branding with moral reprobation acts which in themselves are not morally wrong, is never done, without danger to the essential interests of morality itself. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 9, 1859, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Truth.—Davenport and Co. have just received, from the Agricultural and Horticultural Warehouse of David Landreth & Son, Phila., the largest lot of fresh and genuine Garden Seeds ever seen in these parts.  The great failing in most seeds sold in public markets is, that frequently not more than two and a half out of each paper will ever show themselves after being planted, and consequently families are very often almost deprived of vegetables.  Buy Landreth's seeds, of Davenport & Co., and then when green-mantled Spring arrives, verdancy will exhibit itself in your garden instead of upon your countenance, for having been gulled with bad seed. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 2, c. 1
           
A Chance Yet.—Mr. Hughes is still among us, and is disposing of his Maps rapidly.  Those who wish to procure the best map of North America now extant, displaying as it does, all the counties, towns, railroads, &c., &c., will do well to be in haste. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 2, c. 1
           
We have purchased, and will receive in a few days, the largest stock of Printing Material that was ever brought into Eastern Texas, and when it arrives, we will defy any office in the State, outside of Galveston, to execute a better job of work that we will then turn out.  We have over one hundred different varieties of type, [illegible] our former supply, renders our book and job office complete.  All we have to say is, give us a trial, and you will then see that we have not exaggerated. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 2, c. 2
           
[illegible] evening last, after an absence of four weeks to the city of New Orleans, where we have been on business connected with the "Reporter."  Our trip was in every respect, a most pleasant one—full of incidents and excitement—the enjoyment of which will not soon be forgotten.  When we left, our health had been wretched for months—we return strong and well, and feel ourself once more able to enter upon the discharge of our editorial duties.  The last letter from us, while on our journey, was written from Grand Ecore, while we were en-route for the city which latter place we reached in due season.  We found New Orleans full to overflowing with strangers from every part of the country, drawn thither by business, or the pursuit of pleasure.  Every hotel was crowded with visitors and finding it impossible to procure accommodations, we were obliged to take a private room, large numbers of which are kept ready furnished for rent.  Any person who designs remaining in the city for a couple of weeks or more, will find this plan of living the most pleasant and agreeable, lodging in this manner, and "feeding wherever and whenever he pleases."
           
Every place of amusement in the Crescent city is now presenting its most attractive bills, and each are nightly thronged with the beauty fashion and elite which have congregated for the winter.  The celebrated tragedian, Booth, has been playing an engagement at the St. Charles Theatre, drawing well.  We witnessed his deliniations [sic] of King Lear, Richard III, and Hamlet, and in certain portions of these plays, never saw him surpassed.  He is an actor of great promise.  Actors of lesser note are playing at the "Varieties."  Geo. Christie's Minstrels are holding forth at Odd Fellow's Hall, which is crowded nightly.
           
As a matter of course, while in the city, we took a ride down to the Lake, on the shell road, behind a 2.40 nag, and partook of a sumptuous and magnificent fish dinner, such as is not to be obtained elsewhere in the known world.  The fame of "Dan Hickock's Lake House," has extended to every part of habitable Globe, and his "fish dinners" would put to shame the table of a Monarch.  Our mouth fairly waters at the recollection.  And while upon this subject, we may as well remark, that in the city, as fine a dinner (or any other meal) can be obtained at Sam's House on St. Charles St., as the most fastidious epicure could desire.  Every delicacy which can be imagined, is at the order of the guest, and "Sam" (McClure) is a host and not mistake.
           
We visited one or two of the Police Courts, not as a defendant, but simply as a spectator, and the summary manner in which justice is dispensed strikingly contrasts with the legal tribunals of Texas.  Ten minutes is ample time in which to try, convict and hang a poor devil in New Orleans.
           
We made a large number of most pleasant acquaintances while in the city, who did every thing in their power to render our stay both profitable and agreeable.  Indeed we do not believe that any other city can produce as social, polite and clever a set of gentlemen as live in New Orleans.  A stranger is immediately made to feel at home, and nothing is left undone to contribute to his enjoyment.  This we call true hospitality.
           
After a stay of two weeks, during which time we attended to the business which induced our visit, we left the city, for home, on board the Steamer B. L. Hodge, of which boat a notice will be found in another column.  Among the passengers were a number of gentlemen from our sister town of Henderson, and a more merry and convivial party could not be started.
           
Our friend and contemporary, S. G. Swan Esq., of the Henderson "New Era," was one of the number, he having been to the city on business connected with his excellent paper.  No incident of importance transpired during the trip to Shreveport, saving, perhaps, the knocking down and shooting at a Jew gambler, who had the impudence to pull a passenger's beard.  The pistol bullet just grazed the side of the gambler's head.  We will bet high that he never again plucks a Gentile's beard.
           
On our return we remained a day at Shreveport, engaged in winding up some business matters, and securing wagons for our freight.  We then left for home, where we safely arrived, without stop or hinderance [sic], on Monday last, and found all of our business affairs in a most prosperous condition.—To our Pro Tem, who has had charge of the editorial department of the "Reporter" during our absence we return our thanks for his kindness, and feel assured that our readers have been the gainers by the change.  We are again at our post, which we shall not leave again for some time, and shall endeavor by renewed application, to deserve the continued confidence and patronage of the public. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 2, c. 7
           
State Penitentiary.—We learn from the State Gazette that for the eleven months ending August 31st, 1858, there was a clear net profit of $6,453.52 from the working of the cotton and wollen [sic] factory of the Penitentiary; while the deficit in other respects and in the other departments, amounts to $12,778.80.  Thus while the pursuit of the other branches of labor has resulted in a large loss to the State, the cotton and woolen factory has, by its profits, enabled the State to meet one-half of the loss.
           
The Gazette learns that, with the sanction of the Governor, and approval of the Directors, Gen. Besser has contracted for 60 more looms and 2,376 spindles.  When these are erected, there will then be 900 looms and 3,728 spindles; 400 of them will be employed on wool.  This increase will enable the factory to turn out about a million and a half of yards per annum, worth $225,000.  There will be consumed in this manufacture 1,800 bales of cotton, and 150,000 pounds of wool.  This purchase will give quite an impetus to the planting and farming interests around the factory.
           
Some of the machinery is now afloat, and the whole of it will, doubtless, be in operation by the meeting of the next Legislature.
           
From this successful experiment of cotton manufacturers, can be seen what may be accomplished in other portions of the State, under the more favorable auspices of slave or free labor, instead of convict. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 1

Dental Card.
J. W. Carlton,
Resident Dentist

Has opened an Office in the house owned by H. V. Fowler, up stairs, North side of the Public Square, where he will be pleased to see any who may require the services of a Dentist.
           
Scurvy cured—No cure no pay!

References.

            James Rogers, Titus County, Texas.
           
W. G. Suggs,  "            "            "
           
R. Booth, Upshur County,             "
           
U. Harkey,            "            "            "
           
Dr. G. Slaughter, Marshal,            "
           
Ex. Gov. McDonal, Marietta, Georgia.
           
Dr. J. B. Randal,            "            "
           
Hon. E. Y. Hill, "           

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            That letters of administration were granted to B. W. and W. B. Thompson on the 29th day of Dec. 1858, on the estate of John Thompson dec'd, by the Probate Court of Smith county, this is therefore to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them as the law directs, and all those who may be indebted to said estate are requested to come forward immediately if not sooner, and make payment.
                                               
                                    B. W. Thompson            }
                                               
                                    W. B. Thompson            } Admrs.
v4n20-6t.                                                                                 January 10, 1859. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 1

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by W. A. Hudgins, and estrayed before Samuel Pinkerton, J P in Beat No. 5 Smith county, one cream colored pony mare, about 4 years old, branded with the letter D, on the left shoulder, and appraised at $40.00, on the 19th of October, 1858.
           
v4n21-3t                                                                     R. W. Chapman, Clk. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 1

Administratrix Notice.

            At the February term of the County Court of Smith county, pertaining to estates of decedants [sic] letters of administration were granted to the undersigned on the estate of C. C. Taylor dec'd.  Persons holding claims against said estate will present them as required by law, and those indebted will make payment.
                       
                                                                        Sarah J. Taylor,
                                               
                                                Adm'x.
           
Persons having business pertaining to the estate will please call on B. T. Selman, Esq., at his law office, where they will receive attention.            S. J. G.
v4n24-4t 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 1

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by J. D. G. Adrian, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves J P in Beat No. 1, Smith county, Texas, one yoke of Oxen, one a brindle red, some white about his hind parts, marked with a crop off each ear with the letters N E cut on his left horn, about ten or twelve years old, has on a bell.  The other a pale red, with some white about his flanks, marked with a crop off the left ear and swallow fork in the right, no brands perceivable, about six or seven years old, and both appraised at sixty-five dollars.
                                               
                                                B. W. Chapman, Clk.
                                               
                                                Feb. 7, 1859. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 2

Work!  Work!!  Work!!!

            The undersigned take this method of informing the public that they have this day associated together as partners in the manufacture of

House-Hold Furniture,

Such as Bureaus, Wardrobes, Secretaries, Safes, Bedstead, Centre, Dressing, Dining and Folding Tables;--together with any and all other articles of Furniture usually manufactured in a Southern Cabinet Shop.  All of which they propose to sell as low or lower than any other establishment in the State—For Cash!—or cash arrangements only.  Call and examine our stock.
                                               
                                    Whitehead, Haltom & Co.
v4n23-3t                                                                                  Jamestown, Jan. 18th, 1859. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 2

Executors Notice.

            Thos. S. Hanson, Executor of the last will and testament of Frances Hanson, dec'd, has filed his account and exhibit for final settlement at the next term of this court, to be held at the Court house in Tyler on the last Monday in Feb. next 1859; this is therefore to notify all persons interested therein to appear at that time, and show cause if any they have why the same shall not be granted.  Given under my hand and Seal of the County Court at Tyler, Feb. 1st, 1859.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman,
v4n23-4t                                                                                  Clk. C. C. S. C. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 2

Administrators Notice.

            That B. B. Bonner, Adm'r on the estate of W. B. F. Bonner, dec'd has filed his exhibit for final settlement at the next regular term of this court, to be held at Tyler on the last Monday in Feb. next 1859; this is therefore to notify all persons interested therein to appear at that time, and show cause, if any they have why the same shall not be granted in accordance with said petition.  Given under my hand and Seal of the County Court at Tyler, Feb 1st 1859.                                                          R. W. Chapman.
v1n23-4t                                                                                  Clk. C. C. S. C. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 2

Notice This!!

            The undersigned, having permanently located at James Town, Smith Co., Texas, takes this method of informing the public that he is ready and prepared to do all kinds of WAGON and CARRIAGE work either in Wood or Iron.  All work done with neatness and dispatch, and all work warranted when done.                              
                                                                                                        Powell Cole,
v4n21-1y                                                                                             Jan. 18, 1859. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 2
Joseph Chamders [sic?]        }            In District
           
No. 826:  vs.            }            Court of Smith
Wm. Chambers                    }            County in the
State of Texas, June Term A D 1859—vacation Jan. 25, 1859.
           
Whereas on this day the Plaintiff in the above entitled cause, by his attorney J. F. Warren, made affidavit, agreeable to the Statute in such cases, made and provided that the defendant, William Chambers, was beyond the jurisdiction of this Court, and there was no attorney of record on whom notice and copy of interrogatories could be served for the purpose of taking deposition &c., the defendant William Chambers  will therefore please take notice that on or after the thirtyeth [sic] day after service of this notice by publication, application will be made to the Clerk of the District Court of the county of Smith and State of Texas, for a commission to take the deposition of John W. Mcafee and Henry C. Kellog, who reside in the county of Forsyth and State of Georgia and are witnesses in behalf of the plaintiff in a certain suit now pending in the District Court of the county and State aforesaid, wherein Joseph Chambers is plaintiff and the said William Chambers is defendant.
           
Test. R. B. Long, C'k, D. C. S. Co.
[seal]  Given under my hand and Seal of office at Tyler, this the 24th day of January, A D 1859.
           
R. B. Long, Clk. C. S. Co.
v4n224-4 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 2

Fair Warning!!

            All persons indebted to the undersigned, either by note or account, are requested to call in and SETTLE.  I need money, and hope those owing me will "consider themselves invited" without further notice.
Jan'y 24, 1859.                                                             J. M. Douglas.
           
Just Arrived, a lot of Family Groceries, Consisting of Sugar, Coffee, Salt, Molasses, Irish Potatoes &c. &c.
           
For sale cheap for Cash
v4n22                                                                                       J. M. Douglas. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 2

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by S. D. Kay, and estrayed before Leion [sic?] Pace, J P in Beat No. 4, Smith county, one light bay horse about 15 hands high, 7 years old, and shod all round, and appraised at $75.00.  Another, a bright bay horse, six years old, 14½ hands high, some saddle marks, weak eyes, the left eye nearly out, a star in his forehead, and appraised at $75.00.  Also one black mule, common size, supposed to be 3 years old next spring, mane and tail lately shaved, appraised at $62.50.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman,
v4n20-3t                                                                                  Clk. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1959, p. 3, c. 2

Wm. G. Dunbar,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Smith County, Tex.,
[Late of Norfolk, Virginia, where he was
with Hon. J. S. Millson.
]

Will practice in all the Courts of the 9th Judicial District; also in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler.

References.

[all out of state] 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 3

Dr. E. Jones,

Having permanently located here, offers his professional services to the citizens of Tyler and the surrounding country.  Office on the East side of the Public Square, (adjourning Dr. Warren's office,) where he may be found at all hours, unless professionally absent.
v4n20-1y                                                                     Tyler, Tex., Jan. 5th, 1859 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 3

Edwin G. Baxter,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Texas.

            Will practice in all the Counties of the 9th Judicial District, and the Federal and Supreme Courts at Tyler.

References.

[all out of state] 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 3
James A. Dwiggins       }
           
vs.                    }                      No. 178.
W. S. Smith                  }
                       
State of Texas   }
                       
Smith County   }
To any lawful officer of said county—Greeting:
--
           
Whereas, James A. Dwiggins has filed his affidavit in my office, stating that W. H. Smith is justly indebted to him in the sum of Forty 55-100 dollars, and that the said Smith is absent from the State, so that the ordinary process of law cannot be served upon him.  This is therefore to command you to cite the said W. H. Smith, by publication for three successive weeks, in the Tyler Reporter, commanding him to be and appear before me at my office in Canton in Precinct No. 6, in Smith county, on the last Saturday in February 1859, to answer the complaint of James A. Dwiggins in a plea of debt for the sum of forty 55-100 dollars due by account for the year 1858.  Herein fail not but due service render and return make hereof as the law directs.
           
Given under my hand on the 5th day of February 1859.
                                               
                                    I. W. Engledow,
v4n24-3t                                                                                  J. P. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 3

Removed.

            Dr. J. J. Reeves has removed his head quarters from Tyler to Sulphur Springs, Hopkins county, Texas, where he will continue his Drug and Family Medicine business.  He will also continue the treatment of Chronic Diseases of all classes.  Invalids and correspondents generally will hereafter address him at that place.
v4n15-8t.                                                                                 Tyler, Dec. 7, 1858. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 3

J. M. Douglas.
West Corner of North Broadway.
Tyler, Texas.

Keeps constantly on hand, and will be receiving additional supplies of seasonable Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Queensware, Hardware, &c, &c.  All of which he offers at low figures to punctual customers, and to persons who wish to buy exclusively for the CASH, greater inducements will be offered than by any other house who buy their goods by day light!  An assortment of

Family Groceries

will be kept for the accommodation of the public.  He invites an examination of his stock by those who desire to purchase bargains.

                                                                                    June [illegible] 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4-5

Geo. Yarbrough,
North-East Corner Public Square,
Tyler, Texas,
Wholesale and Retail
Dealer in
Dry Goods,

Of every variety and description.  Groceries, Saddlery, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, Castings, Hardware, Powder, shot, &c., &c.  An examination of my Stock is respectfully elicited. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4-5

J. T. Simmons                                       L. Randal
Simmons & Randal,
Book and Drug Store.

Having entered into the Book and Drug Store business, in Tyler, will keep constantly on hand a good assortment of fresh and genuine Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Paints, Oils, Dye Stuffs, Brushes, Fancy Articles, and in fact, every thing in their line.  Also a good assortment of

School Books,
and

Stationery of every variety.  Religious, Miscellaneous and Standard Literature.
Liberal inducements offered to Physicians and others who buy by the quantity. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4-5

J. F. Rasbury.                                       W. J. Saunders.
J. F. Rasbury & Co.
New Brick Building, North Side Public Square.
Tyler, Texas.
Dealers in
Foreign and Domestic Staple and
Fancy Dry Goods, Clothing, Hard-
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Saddlery, Queensware,
Plantation Supplies,
Of every Description &c., &c.
We invite the public to examine for themselves. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4-5

H. O. Hynson,
North Side Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.
Dealer, in Staple and Fancy Dry Goods and Groceries,
Ready Made Clothing, Hats, Caps, Bonnets,
Boots, Shoes, Hardware, Cutlery, Glassware,
Queensware, Woodware, Tinware, Saddlery.
Drugs, Window Glass, Oils, Paints, Dye Stuffs, &c., &c.  Together with a general assortment of every article found in a Retail Store.  For sale at the lowest market prices for Cash, or on the usual time to punctual customers. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4-5

F. N. Garry.                 A. O. Erwin.              Bryan Marsh.
F. N. Gary & Co.
(South West Corner, Public Square,) Tyler, Texas.
Dealers in Staple and Fancy Dry
Goods and Groceries, Ready-Made
Clothing, Hats, Caps, Bonnets, Boots, Shoes, Hardware,
Cutlery, Glassware, Queensware, Woodware, Tinware,
Saddlery, Window Shades, School and Miscellaneous
Books, Drugs, Window Glass, Oils, Paints, Dye Stuffs, &c., &c.
Together with a general assortment of every article found in a
Retail Store.  For sale at the lowest market prices, and to which we most
respectfully invite the attention of the citizens of Smith and adjoining counties. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4-5

Dr. Joe W. Davenport.                               Wm. Davenport.
Davenport & Bro.
(Sign of the Golden Mortar,)

                        Large Brick Building,
                       
                        North-West Corner, Public Square,
                                               
                        Tyler, Texas.

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Drugs,

            Medicines, Pure Chemicals, Paints, Oils, Dye Stuffs, Brushes, Stationary [sic], Fancy Articles, &c., &c.—All fresh and selected with the greatest care in the Cities of New York and Philadelphia. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4

Piano Tuning.
Prof. J. B. Norman,

            Having located in Tyler, would inform the citizens of this and adjacent counties that he is prepared to Tune and Repair Pianos, upon the shortest notice and on the most reasonable terms.  All orders directed to him at this place will receive immediate attention.
           
v4n6-tf.                                                                        Tyler, Oct. 6, 1858 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4
           
Molases [sic] by the Bbl, half Bbl, and Gallon for sale, low at Douglas' corner.
           
Coffee, a few sacks best Rio, for sale cheap, at Douglas' corner.

J. M. Douglas,
Notary Public. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 4

For Sale!

A Valuable Family Residence for sale.  Apply to

                                                                                    Stephen Reaves,
                                               
                                                Tyler, Texas. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 5

Taloring [sic]

            The undersigned (lately from Livingston, Ala.) respectfully announces to the citizens of Tyler and vicinity, that he has opened a

Tailor Shop

at the office lately occupied by Stephen Reaves Esq., on the North side of the Public Square, where he will be pleased to wait upon any gentleman who desires his services.  In all cases, he warrants

A Fit.

            From several years experience in the business, he flatters himself that he can give perfect satisfaction to all who may give him a call.
                                               
                                    W. J. Dutrannois.
           
March 3, 1858—v3n27-1y 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 5

$50,00.
Mound Prairie Institute
At Mound Prairie, Anderson
County, Texas. 

Faculty, Male Department,

Elder Jas. R. Malone, A. M. President
Elder M. V. Smith, Assistant.

Rates Tuition, Five Months.

            1st Class,                                                   $10.00
           
2d Class,                                                   $15.00
           
3d Class,                                                   $20.00
Pupils received at any time, and charged only from day of entrance.
           
N. B.—The President has erected Dormitories, on his own land, for twenty, and is now erecting others, and will soon be ready to accommodate fifty young men.  Only two pupils in one room.  The occupants held responsible for all damages to furniture or dormitories, by carelessness, neglect, or willfulness; and said damages will be charged to parents or guardians, as much so as Tuition or Book bills.
           
Board can be had at from $8 to $10 per month.
           
Sept. 2d, 1858.                                             J. R. Malone. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 5

Price of Lumber at Richardson's Mill.

Ordinary square-edge lumber under 20 ft long (board measure) Cash  $15.00 per M.
           
(If charged,)                                                                                       $18.75 per M.
Lathing, or small ripped lumber                                                                       $20.00 M.
           
(If charged,)                                                                                       $25.00 per M
Sheeting plank                                                              75 cents per 100 feet.
           
(If charged,)                                                          $1.00 per 100 feet.
Lumber 20 ft. or over 25 per cent extra.
Bills filled upon short notice.
                                               
                                    S. Q. Richardson.
           
Those who owe me for lumber, are requested to pay up, as I need the money to pay my debts.
           
Jan. 13, 1858—v3n18-6m 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 5
           
Winter Clothing:--A new and splendid assortment of all kinds and the latest styles, just received and for sale, low, by                         Geo. Yarbrough.
                                               
                                                Oct. 20, 1858.
           
Hats, Caps and Bonnets:--a large stock just received, and for sale, cheap, by
                                               
                                                Geo. Yarbrough.
                                               
                                                Oct. 20, 1858. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 6

Capt. Richard Carlton

Is my duly authorized Agent during my absence from the State.
                                               
                                                L. P. Butler.
v4n23-3t                                                                                  Jan. 29, 1859. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 6

New Cabinet
Shop.
William
Sheppard

Would respectfully inform the citizens of Tyler, that he has opened a Cabinet Shop in the lower room of the "Temple Building," where he intends to

Manufacture and Prepare
Every Description of
Furniture!

            He also designs in future to keep on hand an extensive variety of

Cabinet Work

Such as
           
Bureaus, Wardrobes, Tables, Lounges,
                       
Bedsteads, Stands, Safes, Book-
                       
            Cases, Desks, &c., &c.
           
These articles will be manufactured from the best material, and put up in superior workman-like manner.  The public are invited to give him a call
           
v4n16-1y                                                        Tyler, Dec. 17, 1858. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 6

Tyler English and Classical
Male School.

            Will begin its first Session, for the present year, on Monday, the 24th of January.

Terms of Tuition—20 Weeks.

Orthography and Reading                                                     $10.00
Penmanship, Mental Arithmetic and Primary Geography          12.00
English Grammar, Geography, Arithmetic, Composition,
           
and Declamation,                                                        16.00
Algebra, Natural Science, Latin and Greek                              20.00
Latin and Greek (continued), Mental and Moral Science
           
and Higher Mathematics.                                             25.00
Fuel and other incidentals, per Session,                                    $1.00
           
Tuition due at close of session.  Pupils charged from time of entrance to close of session, and no deduction made except in very peculiar cases.
           
All experience having demonstrated the absolute necessity of a firm and efficient discipline to the successful conduct of educational institutions, implicit obedience to every regulation will be exacted without favor, and no Student will be retained in School who manifests an habitual disposition to disregard its requirements.
                                               
                                    W. H. Smith,
                                               
                                                Principal.
v4n21                                                                           Jan. 17, 1859. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 6

Tyler
Male
Independent
School!
First Session, 1859.

This Institution will open again on the third Monday in January, for the reception of students.

Rates of Tuition per Session of 20 Weeks.

1st Class—Orthography, Reading and Writing                                                    $8.00
2nd Class—Primary Geography, Mental Arithmetic, History and Definer             $12.00
3rd Class—English Grammar, Large Geography, Practical Arithmetic, History,
           
Natural Philosophy, and Elocution, one or all,                                         $15.00

Collegiate Course.

1st Class—Chemistry, Rhetoric, Latin, Algebra, (Davies) and Moral
           
Philosophy                                                                                              $18.00
2nd Class—Latin, (continued) Logic, Algebra, (continued), Davies Legendre,
           
and Mental Philosophy,                                                                           $20.00
3rd Class—Latin, (continued), Astronomy, Davis Legendre, (continued),
           
Surveying (Davies) and Laws of Nations                                                  $20.00
           
Contingent expenses per session                                                                $1.00
           
Tuition due at the close of each session.  Discount of ten per cent on advance payments.  Tuition charged from time of entrance to close of current session unless all arrears be paid at the time of withdrawal.
           
Deductions will be made for sickness if promptly reported.
v4n20-20t                                                                                            Jas. P. Douglas 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 6

Notice!

            Six Notes—each for $83.33 1/3, --making in all five hundred dollars.  These notes are dated Dec. 1st, 1856, and were given by Thos. H. Knight, payable in Dec., 1857 to Alexander A. Hill, and are marked "D, E, F, G, H. I."  All persons are hereby warned not to buy or trade for any of the above notes, as the consideration for which they were given has failed, and I will not pay them.
           
v4-20-3t                                                                                 Thos. H. Knight. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 6

Notice!

            All those indebted to the late Firm of F. N. Gary & Co. will please come forward and settle.  We must have money, and are determined to close up the old business immediately.
  
                                                                          F. N. Gary & Co. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

Runaway Slave.

            Committed to the Jail of Smith county, on the 19th of January, 1859, a Negro Man, about 32 years of age, black complexion, with a mustache and whiskers, about 5 feet 6 inches high, heavy built, and calls his name "Bill," and says that he belongs to Archy McMillan, who lives about 25 miles from Shreveport, in Caddo Parish, La., near Spring Ridge.  The owner is requested to some forward, prove property, and pay charges, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.
                                               
                                    J. M. Williams, Sh'ff S. C.
           
v4n21                                                                                       Jan. 19, 1859 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

New Goods!

            Being permanently located, and at my old Stand

North Side Public Square.

where I can always be found, and from my long experience in business—my personal attention, and having ample facilities and no Partner to divide with, I can and will sell better bargains—sell better and more goods, and keep constantly on hand a greater variety to other inducements than any other four concerns in the country.  I am now receiving a

Splendid Stock
of Ladies' Dress Goods, New Style
Hoop Skirts, Prints, Berages, &c.,
New Style Bonnetts, Brown
and Planters Linens, De-
nims, and Cotton
Ades.
Boots and Shoes,
a large Stock.
Hats a general assort-
ment of the Latest Style.
Ready Made Clothing—Coats,
Vests, Pants, Shirts, all kinds.
Hardware—Chisels, Hammers,
Saws, Axes, all kinds—Drugs a
general stock—quinine, Indigo,
Madder, Soda, &c. &c.—Crockery
and Glass Ware, a variety of the
Latest Style.—Saddles, Bridles.
Collars, Hame Strings, &c., &c.

School Books, Bibles, Testaments, Poetical Works, &c., Jewelry, Breast Pins, Finger Rings, Ear Drops, Gold Pens, Pencils, &c.  Also a good Lot of Groceries—Coffee, Sugar, Tobacco, &c., in all of which I invite the special attention of those wishing to purchase in all the surrounding country.
           
March 24, 1858—v.n30.
                                               
                                                Geo. Yarbrough. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

Mathias Lahnes,
Fashionable
Shoe and Boot Maker:

            Takes this method of informing the citi- [sic] of Tyler and surrounding country that he has opened a Shoe and Boot Shop on the West side of the Square, next door to Smith's Hotel, where he will be pleased to fill all orders in his line of business.  From his long experience in the business he flatters himself that he can give entire satisfaction.  Gentlemen, all who want a fine boot and a good fit give him a call.  He solicits a share of patronage.

            v3n48                                                                           July 28, 1858. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

Patton's Port Steam Mills.

            The undersigned has received for his Mills a new BOILER and a new SAW.  He has now on hand a considerable quantity OF LUMBER, at the following prices, and is prepared to fill all orders with despatch:

Cash Prices.

Square Lumber, per hundred feet,                                                    $1.25
Small Riped [sic]      "                                                                       $1.75
Sheeting,                                                                                          $0.75
           
If I credit, the usual extra per cent. (25 per cent) will be charged.
v3n42tf                                                                         David Hill. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

Groceries!!
T. Albertsen & Bro.

Have just received, direct from New Orleans, a large and splendid assortment of

Family Groceries.

Wines, Brandies, Tobacco, Cigars, Sugar, Coffee, etc., etc., which  they will sell cheaper for Cash, than any other house in Tyler.
All that we ask is a call, being convinced that we can demonstrate to purchasers that they can obtain

Bargains

at our house.  We shall continue our Bakery establishment as heretofore.
                                               
                                                May 25th 1857. 1y 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

Barber Shop.
The Undersigned
would respectfully inform

the public that he has located at Tyler and opened a Barber Shop, in the house formerly occupied by Murphy & Co., on the West Side of the Public Square, where he will at all times be found ready to attend to all who may favor him with a call.  Hair curling done upon the shortest notice.
           
Ladies waited upon at their residences.
                                               
                                                Conrad Lang
v4n3                                                                                                     Tyler, Sept. 15, 1858 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

Notice!

            Samuel L. Earle, Esq., of Tyler, holds my full power of Attorney.
                                               
                                                Peter MacGreal.
v4n20                                                                                                   Tyler, Jan. 1, 1859 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 3, c. 7

Notice.

            All those wishing to purchase Tin Ware, will find it to their advantage to call on me, at the old stand, North West corner Public Square—the only place where tin of my make can be had.  Those needing guttering or Job Work, of all descriptions, can be accommodated.  All tin ware make [sic] by me will be warranted.
                                               
                                                Martin Horn.
           
v3n21-tf                                                                                  Jan. 12, 1859. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 1 [note:  only Smith County transcribed]

Legal Directory
For the State of Texas.

            Every Attorney who subscribes for the "Tyler Reporter," will have his name inserted in this Directory free of charge.

Tyler, Smith County.

Stephen Reaves,                                                B. L. Goodman,
T. W. Jones,                                                     John C. Fowler,
B. T. Selman,                                                    F. N. Gary,
J. C. Robertson,                                                F. M. Hays,
Smith & Earle,                                                  Geo. W. Chilton,
Jack Davis,                                                       James F. Warren,
D. W. Crow,                                                    R. B. Hubbard, 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 1

Wanted to Hire!!

            Three or Four No. 1 Negro Men, whether by the month or season, for which the highest cash price will be paid.  Apply to the undersigned at his Steam mill, 3½ miles southeast of Tyler.
           
v3n22tf                                                                         S. Q. Richardson. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 2

Notice.

            Any person having my book the "American Biography," will please return it and oblige
                                               
                                                R. F. Murphy. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 5

U. S. Mail Line
From

            Henderson, via Tyler, Athens and Corsicana to Waco commencing July 1, 1858.
           
Leaves Henderson Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, arrives at Waco fourth day.
           
Leaves Waco Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays, arrives at Henderson fourth day.
           
The lane has the contract for carrying the U. S. Mail, and travellers will find the most direct expeditions and cheapest route to and from the West.  Connects at Waco with stages to Austin and all points in Western Texas—Henderson with stages for Marshall, Shreveport, and points in Eastern Texas.
           
G. W. Bates     }                                  J. R. Allen,
           
Agent               }                                  Contractor.
           
v3n46                                                   tf 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 5

House
and Ornamental
Painting

            The undersigned is permanently located in Tyler, and is prepared to execute all orders in the line of his business.  He flatters himself, that his work is inferior to none in the country, and he is certain that his charges are as small if not smaller than any other painter in this section.  I refer to the work already executed by me in this place as a specimen of what I can do.  A share of the patronage of the public is respectfully solicited.
                                               
                                                T. L. Dunn.
Feb 2, 1858-v3n23-6m 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 6

Prospectus
of
Volume Four
of the
Tyler Reporter.

            The Reporter has now entered its Fourth Volume, and its prospects are more flattering than ever before.  For over two years past, the present Editor has used every exertion to improve the sheet, and render it worthy of the confidence and support of the People.  His efforts have been, to a considerable extent, rewarded by renewed and extended patronage, and he now takes pleasure in stating that the Reporter is in a more prosperous [missing word] than ever before.
           
But in order that we may make the improvements which we design, that the interest of the paper may be increased, and that we may be better able to make it, as far as possible, all that it should be, we are under the necessity of calling upon the citizens of our own and other counties in Eastern Texas for an extension of their patronage.
           
The Reporter sill continue to be the advocate

Of the People,

            The Constitutional privileges of all classes of our citizens, be they Foreign or Native—the perpetuity of the Union of the States—the Rights of the South in this Confederacy, and bitter and uncompromising hostility to sectional agitators.
           
The Reporter will be found the advocate of, and will do all in its power to sustain the true and sound policy of Internal improvements in our State—giving to is readers, as far as possible, the action and views of the different portions of the country upon this subject.
           
The Political character of the paper is well known.  It will hereafter, as it has done heretofore, advocate the principles of

True Democracy.

and will be the untiring opponent of Know Nothingism, in whatever shape or form it may present itself.

To the Legal Profession

we would say, that we regularly publish the Opinions, in full, of the Supreme Court at Tyler, as soon as possible after delivery from the Bench, which renders the Reporter invaluable to the Legal Fraternity.
           
The Terms &c. will be found on the first page.
                                               
                                                S. M. Warner,
                                               
                                                            Editor. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 7

Mail Arrangements.
Arrival and Departures.
Nacogdoches Mail.

            Leaves Tyler every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at 4 o'clock, a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at 10 o'clock p.m.
           
Crockett Mail, Leaves Tyler every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 6 o'clock a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at 10 p.m.
           
Henderson Mail, Passes from Henderson to Waco, every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at 5 p.m.  From Waco to Henderson every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at 9 a.m.
           
Paris Mail, Leaves Tyler every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 6 a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, at 6 p.m.
           
James Town Mail.  Leaves Tyler, every Saturday at 6 a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Saturday, at 8 p.m.
           
Kaufman Mail, Leaves Tyler every Monday, and Thursday, at 6 a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Tuesday and Friday at 6 p.m.
           
McKinney Mail.  Leaves Tyler every Monday at 6 a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Saturday at 10 p.m.
           
Gilmer Mail.  Leaves Tyler every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday at 6 a.m.—Arrives at Tyler every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 10 p.m.
           
Grand Bluff Mail.  Leaves Tyler every Monday at 8 a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Wednesday at 6 p.m.
           
Marshall Mail.  Leaves Tyler every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at 6 a.m.  Arrives at Tyler every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 6 p.m.
                                               
                                                B. C. Sigler P.M. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 6

To the Afflicted.

            The undersigned is now prepared to relieve those suffering with Rheumatism.  He is also prepared to cure Sore Eyes.  The Remedies used for the above diseases are entirely external applications.  My terms will be reasonable.  Call and get the remedy and try it.  These Medicines are put up by myself, and are no humbug.  In my absence they can be found at J. F. Rasbury & Co's Store.
                                               
                                                R. E. Curlee.
v4n4-1y                                                                                   Tyler, Sept. 20, 1858. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 7

U. S. Mail Line,
Between Tyler and Nacogdoches.

The undersigned would inform the traveling public that they have commenced running a line of two horse hacks between Tyler and Nacogdoches, under their contract with the Post Office Department, and will make regular

Tri-Weekly Trips,

between these two points.  Comfortable Hacks, good horses, and safe drivers will be kept constantly upon the line.
           
This line connects regularly with the route from Nacogdoches to Alexandria, and also to Austin.
           
Leaves Tyler on every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
           
Leaves Nacogdoches on every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.

Rates of Fare:

            From Tyler to Nacogdoches               $8.00
           
"                       Canton                         1.50
           
"                       Knoxville                      2.50
           
"                       Griffin                           3.00
           
"                       Salem                           4.50
           
"                       Linn Flatt                      6.50

                                                                        Houston & Lef, Proprietors.

July 6th, 1858            v3n43-tf 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 7

Godey's
Ladies Book.
L. A. Godey, Philadelphia
Terms, Cash in Advance

            One copy one year                                                              $3
           
Two copies one year                                                             5
           
Three copies one year                                                           6
           
Five copies one year, and an extra copy to the
person sending the club                                                                    10
            Eight copies and an extra copy to the person
sending the club, making nine copies                                                 15
           
Eleven copies and an extra copy to the person
sending the club, making twelve copies                                             20
            The above terms cannot be deducted from no matter how many are ordered.
           
Gody's [sic] Ladys [sic] Book and Arthers [sic] Home magazine both one year for $3.50
           
Address                                                           L. A. Godey.
                                               
                        No. 113 [?] Chesnut Sq. Phladelphia. 

TYLER REPORTER, February 19, 1859, p. 4, c. 7

Ho! for the Gold Mines.
O. Kolstad,
Watchmaker
Tyler, Texas

            Respectfully informs the Citizens of Smith and adjoining counties that he has settled permanently in Tyler, and intends devoting his whole time to his business.  He has, at great expense, erected an elegant

Establishment

on the West side of the Public Square where he may be found at all times, ready to wait on gentlemen and particularly the LADIES.  He pledges himself to do anything in his line, at short notice, and in a neat and workmanlike manner.  ALL WORK WARRANTED.|
            See sign of O. Kolstad and consider yourself invited in, without ceremony.
           
Jan 1, 1858—1y. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 1, masthead
H. V. Hamilton & Co., Publishers & Proprietors.
"Upon the Education, Intelligence and Virtue of the Masses depends our Existence as a Free People." 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 1, c. 1
           
Terms:--$2.50 per annum, if paid in advance, or $3.50 at the expiration of the year.
           
No subscription shall be discontinued until all the arrearages are paid.
           
Ten copies, of paid for at one time, will be sent to one post-office for twenty dollars, or five copies, for eleven dollars and twenty-five cents.
           
All Postmasters are authorized to act as Agents, and deduct ten per cent. on moneys they remit. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 1, c. 1

Professional Cards. 

S. A. Goodman Jr.,
Attorney at Law.

Will practice in the District Courts of the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts.  Also in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler.  All business entrusted in his care, will receive immediate attention.
           
Tyler, Smith Co., Texas, April 27th, 1860. 

Geo. W. Chilton                                     J. F. Warren.
Chilton & Warren,

Will practice as Attorneys at Law, in the counties composing the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts in the State of Texas, and also in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler, or any other Courts of the State where the importance of the case will justify them in leaving their immediate Districts.
           
Address the firm at Tyler, Texas.
           
March 17, 1858—v3n28 

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

            Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
           
Tyler, Smith County, Texas, June 17th, 1858.
                                               
                                                            v1n46-tf 

Stephen Reaves,

            Attorney at Law, will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Court, of the Western District of Texas.  Office, at Tyler.
           
sept 6, 1854                                                                            tfv1n1 

J. C. Robertson                                    B. G. Smith.
Robertson & Smith.
Attorneys at Law.
Tyler, Smith County, Texas.

v2n41-tf 

T. B. Selman
Attorney at Law.

Will endeavor to give satisfaction to those entrusting business to his care in the various duties of the profession.
           
Tyler, Smith County, Texas. 

D. W. Crow,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Smith County, Texas. 

Doctor Wiley Yarbrough,

Having permanently located in Tyler, Smith County, Texas, offers his professional services to the public.  He will devote his whole attention to the different branches of his profession, and may be found at his office, on the North side of the Public Square, next door to the store of George Yarbrough, unless professionally absent. 

Davenport & Goodman,
Physicians & Surgeons,
Tyler, Texas

            Will promptly answer to all calls in the line of their profession.  They have formed a partnership for the practice of Medicine & Surgery, and will be found at all times unless professionally absent, at the Drug store of Davenport & Co., in the brick building on the northwest corner of the Public Square.
           
The attention of both will be given in all cases when necessary without additional charge.
                                               
                                                Jo. W. Davenport, M. D.
                                               
                                                Wm. J. Goodman, M. D. 

H. B. Slaughter,
Resident Dentist,

Having located permanently at Tyler, offers his professional services to the citizens of Smith county.  I will visit any section of the adjoining country, whenever those wishing my services will make it to my interest to do so.  My services may be had by addressing me by letter or otherwise I may be found at my office at all times, when not called off professionally.
           
All operations warranted—not only to stand, but to give satisfaction.
           
Refer to any one for whom I have ever performed. 

Dr. Warren & Jones,

Having associated themselves together in the practice of the various branches of their profession, tender their professional services to the citizens of Smith county.  They hope by prompt attention to business, to merit the continued patronage of their friends.  Special attention will be given to Surgery, and the diseases of Females and Children.  Where the attention of both is necessary, in consultation extra charges will not be made.
           
Office on the East side of the Public Square, at Dr. Warren's old stand, where one or both may always be found, unless professionally absent.
                                               
                                    John H. Warren, M. D.
                                               
                                    E. Jones, M. D.
           
January 11, 1860                                                                                  v5n19—tf 

New Tailoring Establishment

The undersigned would give notice to the citizens of Tyler and vicinity, that they have opened a Tailoring Shop, [tear in paper] 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 1, c. 6
           
Leap Year.—A correspondent sends the following lines on leap year to the St. Louis Bulletin:
           
Then let us nerve our bashful hearts,
                       
And quell each timid doubt,
           
And raise our drooping hopes, and smooth
                       
Our wrinkled features out,
           
And write thereon in letters plain,
                       
That those may read who run—
           
"Proposals thankfully received
                       
'Till eighteen sixty-one." 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 1, c. 7
           
The disaffected K. G. C. of Louisiana and Alabama have pronounced against Gen. Bickley, and elected Col. Greenough their commander. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 1
S. M. Warner, Editor.
J. P. Douglas, Associate Editor.

Terms for Announcements.

For State and District Office                           $10.00
For Beat Office                                                  3.00
For County Office,                                             5.00

Positively,

Our Terms for Announcements, Job Work and Transient Advertisements are invariably

"Cash Up!"

            We intend this year to try the CASH principle, believing that it will be far better, both for us and our patrons.  We work [fold in paper] in Eastern Texas, and to continue so to do, we have been compelled to adopt the above rule, which we shall adhere to. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 1

For Sheriff.

            We are requested to announce J. O. Ramsour as a candidate for Sheriff of Smith county at the ensuing August election.
           
We are authorized and requested to announce that William Yeagar, is a candidate for Sheriff of Smith county.
           
We are authorized and requested to announce that Mathew Wood is a candidate for Sheriff.—election in August next.
           
We are authorized to announce that We are authorized to announce that Benjamin Scott, as a candidate for the office of Sheriff of Smith county, at the ensuing August election.
           
We are requested to announce that David H. Cade is a candidate for Sheriff of Smith county.

For County Clerk.

            We are authorized to announce the name of R. W. Chapman, as a candidate for re-election to the office of county clerk of Smith county at the next August election.
           
We are authorized to announce that Con. F. Reid is a candidate for County Clerk of Smith County, at the next election.
           
We are authorized to announce J. J. Stanford as a candidate for County Clerk of Smith county, at the August election.

For Assessor & Collector.

            We are requested to announce that William Wren is a candidate for re-election to the office of Assessor and Collector, at the August election.

For Treasurer.

            We are authorized and requested to announce that William Green is a candidate for re-election to the office of County Treasurer of Smith county.
           
We are authorized to announce W. S. Walker, of Tyler, as a candidate for Treasurer of Smith county, at the next election.

For Chief Justice.

            We are authorized to announce that S. D. Gibbs is a candidate for re-election to the office of Chief Justice of Smith county.

For Justices o the Peace.

            We are authorized to announce D. W. Crow as a candidate for the office of Justice of the Peace, Beat No. 1.  Election August next.
           
We are authorized to announce that Stephen Reeves, is a candidate for the office of Justice of the Peace in Beat No. 1, Smith county.

For Constable.

            We are requested to announce Thos. L. Dunn as a candidate for Constable Beat No. 1, Smith County.
           
We are requested to announce John M. Hockersmith as a candidate for Constable of Beat No. 1, Smith county.
           
We are authorized to announce that George W. Dickens is a candidate for Constable of Beat No. 1, Smith County.
           
We are authorized to announce John M. Harper as a candidate for re-election to the office of Constable of Beat No. 1, in Smith county, at the election in August next. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 1

Wanted!

            To hire, a negro girl or woman, who is competent to do the cooking and general house work for a small family.  For such a one, a liberal price will be paid.  Apply immediately. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 1

Supreme Court.

            Order of taking up the docket of the Supreme Court of Tyler for the April Term 1860.
           
One week is assigned for the hearing of the Cases from the Eighth Judicial District, beginning on Monday the 23d day of April 1860.
           
Two weeks for the Sixth District, beginning on Monday the 30th day of April 1860.
           
One week for the 9th District, beginning on Monday the 14th day of May 1860.
           
One week for the5th District, beginning on Monday the21st day of May 1860. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 3
           
The Annual Session of the Grand Temple of Honor and Temperance convened in this place on Monday last, and is still in session.  There are in attendance delegations from several subordinate Temples, but owing to a misapprehension as to the time of meeting, a full delegation has not yet arrived.  On yesterday (Tuesday) evening, the Templars had a grand torch-light procession, accompanied by the different Sabbath Schools of Tyler.
           
The night was dark, and the scene, taken all in all; the brilliant transparencies, the beautiful ladies, with eyes not less bright; the gallant sterner spirits (not intoxicating, but certainly ardent) was one of impressive beauty.
           
After marching around the square, the procession proceeded to the Methodist Church, where the audience were entertained with three most interesting addresses.  The first, was by Miss Mollie E. Moore, followed by Miss Lavonia Scott, the Rev. Mr. Gillam closing with and eloquent and powerful appeal in be[illegible] 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 4
           
Marshall Stage Line.—The coaches on this newly established line, are now making regular tri-weekly trips.  The energetic projectors of this enterprise, Messrs. Taylor & Johnson, deserve the patronage of our citizens, more particularly because they have undertaken to do in person what the government has, after repeated petitions from the people refused.
           
This new traveling facility, will add much to our place, placing us within 36 hours travel of Shreveport, whereas, heretofore, it has required three days to reach that point by stage.  It will also have a great tendency to turn the great portion of western travel by Shreveport and this place.  This route is far the nearest and [illegible] 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 5

Our Road.

            We clip the following from the Galveston News of the 8th inst., showing the progress made thus far, in the organization of the Galveston, Houston and Tyler Rail Road Company.  The News says:
           
A meeting of the citizens of Galveston is to be held at the court house tonight, to take measures for raising the amount of stock subscription, required by the charter, to make the organization legal.
           
A stockholders' meeting was held at the Mayor's office on Saturday evening, and was adjourned to meet again at the Court House, on Monday afternoon.  The amount reported to the last meeting, as raised so far, in Galveston, is $256,500.  Of this amount $10,000 is conditioned upon the full amount of $250,000 being raised as required by the Charter.  Stock to the amount of $43,500 more must be subscribed by our citizens, or the organization will fail.
           
The time has gone by for appeals to anything but the pockets of sensible and practical men on t6his subject.  We must do our duty to Eastern Texas in this matter.  We asked the Legislature for this Charter; or, what is equivalent, the members from Eastern Texas, and in Walker and Montgomery counties, accepted the anti-debt, cash paying features, to prevent fraud, which our county suggested and incorporated then in a Charter which they had already put before the Legislature.
           
Our citizens have taken so much of the stock for Galveston, that there are scarcely [illegible]   This meeting is called to allow all property holders, who are as much to be benefited as the mercantile community, the opportunity to aid in this enterprise.  Let every real estate owner go to the meeting, prepared to vote sensibly on his interest.  Remember that we are under the eye of our country friends, who have come to see what we are doing.  Several of them are from Eastern Texas, and it will not do for them to go home and report a failure on the part of the people of Galveston to consummate a plan of such deep interest  to her, and to the rich counties of the Eastern part of the State.
           
It seems that $206,500 of the $250,000 required have been taken, in the city of Galveston.  We are aware that the remaining $43,500 was taken, as men from Eastern Texas were there, prepared to take that amount, if the organization suited them.  So we presume the organization will soon be completed, the road surveyed and books opened for both general and county stock subscription.  We can speak for Smith, and take the responsibility to say that she will take stock enough to build the road through her limits, if the counties below her will bring it within her reach.  We regard this road as being on the most sound and practical plan of any yet chartered in our State, and every citizen of our section of the State, who fails to give it his undivided influence is blind to his own interests. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 7
           
Last evening this section was blessed with another rain, which brightens the already fair prospects of our agriculturalists.  The corn crops throughout our county are more thrifty than they have been for years.  The cotton though retarded in its growth by the backward spring, is looking well and is generally in a high state of cultivation.  The wheat will probably yield much better than was expected, but is in most places inferior. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 7
           
We are in receipt of several pieces of original poetry, which have been, this week, unavoidably crowded out.  They will appear in the next issue. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 7
           
New Store.—Mr. J. W. Brooks informs the public in this issue, that he has opened a new and splendid stock of goods in the Ferguson building.  Mr. Brooks will be found to be a polite gentleman and master of his business, and we welcome him to place among our merchants.  Give him a call and let him speak for himself. 

TYLER REPORTER, May 16, 1860, p. 2, c. 7

J. W. Brooks
with
Thomas Smith,
Brick Store next to Boren & Douglas,
General Dealer in
Dry Goods,
Clothing, Hats,
Hardware, Cutlery, Shoes and Boots.
Saddlery, Queensware, Woodware, Grocer-
ies, &c.  Also a fine lot of Furniture, consisting
of Bureaus, Tables, Rockers, Chairs, Bedsteaads, &c.
Also
Carpetings and Mattings.

           Persons wishing to purchase are respectfully requested to call and examine the stock and prices before buying.  I shall offer inducements.  The stock is entirely fresh and new.
   
        Terms as liberal as those of other houses in this place.
 
Tyler, May 15, 1861.