TYLER REPORTER
1861-1864
(Scattered issues, extracted in detail on local topics)

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 1

Terms.

            $2.50 per annum, if paid in advance; or $3.50 at the expiration of the year.
           
No subscription shall be discontinued until all the arrearages are paid.
           
Ten copies, if paid for at one time, will be sent to one post-office for twenty dollars, or five copies for eleven dollars and twenty-five cents.
           
All Postmasters are authorized to act as Agents, and deduct ten per cent. on moneys they remit. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter
Is published every Thursday,
at $2,50 per Annum;

And gives more and later news than any other paper in Eastern Texas.
           
Having reached a circulation far superior to that ever before enjoyed by any paper in Tyler, the Reporter offers the best advantages to advertisers.
           
Extras are promptly issued whenever the news is important. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 1

Take Notice.

            The notes and accounts of the old firm of H. V. Hamilton and Co., having been transferred to the undersigned, all debtors are called on to settle.
                                               
                                                James P. Douglas. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 7

W. H. Cousins,
Wholesale
and Retail
Grocer.
(North west Cor. Public Square,)
Tyler Texas,

Keeps constantly on hand a large and fresh supply of Provisions, in fact every article usually kept in that line, all of which he offers to the public cheaper than has ever before been sold in this market.  His stock consists in part of the following articles:
Coffee,             Sugar,
           
Molasses,        Teas,
                       
Tobacco,         Segars,
                                               
            Snuff,
           
Wines and Liquors,
                       
Candies Fruits &c., &c.
           
Tyler, march 7, 1861, v6n241y. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 7

J. H. Warren, M. C.
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler Texas.

Offers his professional services to the public.
Office East side of the public. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 7

For Sale,
500,000 Feet of
Dry Pine Lumber.

Flooring and Fencing                        per            H            Ft            $1 00
Ceiling and Weatherboarding              "              "              "               1 00
Sash Lumber and Pailings                   "              "              "               1 25
Framing                                              "              "              "                  75
Sheeting                                             "              "              "                  50
           
The above Lumber was sawed by W. J. Moore, one of the first class sawyers and Engineers in Texas, who still stands at the head of affairs.  It was taken from a fresh Pinery, and sawed by new machinery.  Those who may favor me with a call, will find my Lumber carefully stored, and I flatter myself to fill a bill as quick and of as good a quality of Lumber as can be fitted up at any Mill in Eastern Texas.
Give me one call and see for yourselves.  Four miles North-east of Starrville, Smith county.  The above is my Cash Prices, 10 per cent will be added on time.
                                               
                                    R. T. McFarland.
           
Feb. 7 n20.1vt 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 7

J. G. Woldert,
Tyler, Texas,
Importer
And Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
[fold in paper] 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Dallas Herald thinks the proposition of the Sherman Patriot, to form a new State of a portion of Texas and the Indian Territory, will stimulate Abolition emigration to that section. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
           
We call attention to "Dissolution" Advertisement of Messrs. Davenport & Larkin.  The old business is in the hands of  Dr. Davenport, and he calls on debtors to come up and settle, paying the money in part, and giving notes for the balance.  it will also be noticed, that A. E. Larkin & N. C. Harris, have purchased the establishment, and will hereafter, as heretofore, keep on hand, and for sale on good terms, a large assortment of pure drugs, chemicals, oils, paints, surgical instruments, and in fact, everything kept in a first-class Drug Store.  We know Messrs. Larkin & Harris, to be men of unwavering integrity and sterling business merits, and we bespeak for them a liberal share of the public patronage. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
           
See advertisement of O. Kolstad & Co. in this issue.  They need no commendation where they are known, and only a trial where they are not. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
           
W. H. Cousins showed us yesterday a new lot of tobacco which he had just opened.  We pronounce it very good and very cheap.  You can't do better than to buy groceries from this house. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Sherman Monitor mentions a rumor that Gen. Houston intends to remove to Grayson county, and become a candidate for Governor of the new State to be made out of north Texas and the Chocktaw [sic], Chickasaw, Cherokee and Creek nations.  The rumor lacks confirmation.  The new State has little favor with the Monitor. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 2, c. 5

Letter from Col. R. B. Hubbard.

            The following private letter from Col. R. B. Hubbard, contains interesting details of affairs at Austin.  The Col. will pardon us for taking the liberty of its publication:
                                               
                                    Austin, Texas, March 24, 1861.
James P. Douglas, Esq.,
           
My Dear Sir:--I embrace this opportunity of writing you a short letter, by our fellow-citizen, Col. Jones, who leaves to-morrow for Tyler.  He will inform you more particularly than I can in the limits of a hurriedly written letter, of the acts of the Convention.  Suffice it to say, that General Houston, failing and refusing to take the oath prescribed by the Convention, incidental to and demanded by our change of government, the office of Governor was declared to be vacated.  Lieut. Gov. Clark now fills the Gubernatorial chair de facto and de jure.—The Legislature recognises the act of the Convention, by holding official communication with the late Lt. Governor as the present Executive of Texas.  The Convention has left to the Legislature all matters of legislation over which the State Constitution gives it legislative power, and has very properly abstained from any interference with the province of the Legislature, and made no changes in the organic law, except such as were called for by the act of secession.  What changes were made, I think, will commend themselves to the country, as eminently necessary and proper.  The most important act of that body was the ratification of the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States.  The Convention wisely, I think, took the responsibility of doing this, and their action, I am confident, will be approved by the whole State.  That instrument, which you have doubtless seen ere this, is all that the advocates of States rights and the lovers of republican government could demand.  All the clauses in the old Federal Constitution of doubtful construction have been stricken out, and we have presented to us a compact which secures, for all time, liberty and equality, and whose provisions may be understood and appreciated by the humblest citizen of the Republic.  You have seen that Texas, under that Constitution, is entitled to six Representatives in the Congress of the Confederate States.  it will become the duty of the present Legislature to divide the State into six Congressional Districts which will be done at an early day, and upon the basis of the late census.
           
Inasmuch as the Congress of the Confederate States, under the permanent Constitution, does not convene until December next, and Senators will not be elected until the "regular" meeting of the Legislature, which takes place in the month of November.  The permanent Constitution requires that elections for Senators shall be held at the first regular session of the Legislature next preceding the meeting of Congress.
           
Much business of importance to the State devolves upon the present Legislature.  The State, though her resources are vast, is in debt, and the expense of protecting our exposed borders, incident to our change of government, has been necessarily great.  This embarrassment will be, however, temporary in its character, and the debt incurred will ere long be doubtless assumed by the Confederate States.  president Davis has already ordered the raising of one regiment for our frontier protection, and the men are now being enlisted for that service.  The Convention has also provided for an additional regiment to be put in the field when the exigency demands it.  To provide for these temporary wants is the duty of the Legislature.  When the permanent Government of the Confederate States shall go into operation, better protection will be afforded us than we received at the hands of the former United States.
           
To relieve the State of present indebtedness, and to meet the demands of the future, will receive the earliest attention of the Legislature.  We think that a system will be adopted which, based upon State securities, with the payment of interest provided for beyond contingency, as well as a "sinking fund," from the annual revenues, will enable the State to effect a loan, (the Convention having removed the constitutional restriction,) on most favorable terms; and that, too, without incurring the necessity of heavily increased taxation.  I cannot, as yet, give you the details of the Bill.  Our warrants will then be at par, and the State possess all the means requisite to carry on the government either in peace or war.  In a revolution, however, like this, where liberty and self-preservation are the great impelling incentives to action, a patriotic people will not murmur at the burdens of government, if their imposition is necessary to triumph.  The Legislature will do all in its power to organize the militia, and to secure arms for our volunteer companies.  I think our session will end about the 15th April.  In the meantime I will write you.  Our delegation is well.  Yours truly,
                                               
                        R. B. Hubbard. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 2, c, 5
           
We have now in hand an excellent romance, from the pen of our esteemed friend and correspondent, Mollie E. Moore, which will soon appear. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

O. Kolstad & Co.,
Watchmakers
and
Jewelers,
Tyler, Texas.

Are prepared to make and repair all article of Gold and Silver Jewelry, with or without sets, such as

Spoons
Knives, Forks,
Goblets, Breastpins,
Lockets, Ear-rings, Finger-rings,
Sleeve-Buttons, &c.

Every article will be warranted to contain the genuine metal, and made at New Orleans prices.  Particular attention paid to the Repairing of Watches and Clocks, and the work warranted.

Engraving

of all kinds, done at reasonable prices.
                                               
                                                O. Kolstad & Co. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

Dissolution.

            The partnership heretofore existing between Jo. W. Davenport and A. E. Larkin has been this day dissolved by mutual consent.  The notes and accounts of the firm remain in the hands of Jo. W. Davenport, and he alone is authorized to collect the same.  Debtors will please call and settle by note if cash cannot be paid, as the business must be closed up.
                                               
                                                Jo. W. Davenport,
                                               
                                                A. E. Larkin.
Tyler, Texas, April 2d, 1861.                                                                         [6-29-3w 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

Tyler Dragoons.

            Owing to the state of the weather on last regular drill day, the Dragoons failed to perform their usual duty.  The Company will drill on Saturday, 20th inst., at the usual hour.
6-29-2w.                                                                     J. R. Erwin, O. C. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

The Best Thing Yet.
Furniture!

            My Cabinet Shop (at Josephus Taylor's) is situated seven and a half miles North of Tyler, [illegible] I make all kinds of

Furniture.

and sell it cheaper than anybody.  Don't throw away your money, but come and buy cheap Furniture from

                                                                                                R. Denson.
April 5, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

New Spring & Summer
Goods.
Fleishl & Smith,
They are Now Receiving Their
New Stock of
Spring and Summer
Goods, 

[illegible] at exceeding low Figures for CASH, or to punctual paying Customers on time.
Call around at the NEW BRICK STORE, South side Public Square, and examine for yourself.
           
Tyler, March 27th, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

F. M. Hays,
Attorney & Counsellor at Law.
Tyler, Smith Co. Texas.

            Business entrusted to him will be promptly attended to. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by E. W. Stephens, and estrayed before Ben Brandon, J. P., in Precinct No. 2, Smith county, Texas, one iron gray mare, three years old, medium size, a knot on the left hand hock.  No brand perceivable and appraised at Forty dollars.
           
March 26th, 27t3                                                                     R. W. Chapman Clk. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

300,000.
Fall and Winter
Goods.

            I am now in receipt of my FALL AND WINTER stock; the stock complete, and containing in part as follows:

A General Stock Dry Goods;
N. C. Jeans, and Casimeres;
Gents and Boys Clothing;
Ladies' Cloaks; Hardware;
Sausage Grinders, Cutlery;
Guns, Axes, &c.
Boots and Shoes, Russets, Kip
Brogans, Ladies'
Goat Boots, &c.
School Books,
Stationery, Pens, Pencils, &c.
Yankee Notions, Jewelry, Clocks,
Mouse-Traps, &c.
Drugs, Medicines, a good stock
constantly on hand.
Crockery and Glass Ware, a com-
plete stock.
&c.     &c.     &c.

All of which were selected in person, and bought on the most favorable terms to which I invite the special attention of all persons through the surrounding country, who wish to purchase.  Give me a call, as superior inducements are offered, both in price and quality.
Oct. 5th, 1860.     [6-7]                                                                Geo. Yarbrough. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 2

To Arms!  To Arms!!
J. C. Short.

Would respectfully return his thanks to the public for their liberal patronage heretofore extended to him, and inform the Southern people that he is still manufacturing some of those fine Kentucky Rifles, warranted to kill an

Abolitionist 400 Yards!

He also manufactures Superior Double Barrel Rifles and Shot Guns, and has just opened a fine lot of Colt's Repeating Pistols, English Repeaters, Derringer Pistols, and a variety of single Pistols, Bowie Knives, Shot Bags, Powder Flasks, Game Bags, Patent Wadding, Dram Bottles, &c.  Also keeps on hand a good lot of double and single Shot Guns.
           
A fine lot of Caps, Powder and Lead, and every thing usually kept in the Gun Maker's line, all of which will be sold to suit the hard times.

Repairing,

of all kinds in the Gun line, attended to with neatness and dispatch, and all work warranted.  Shop on the East side of the Square in Tyler, Texas. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Rogers & Sheppard,
Furniture Merchants
and
Cabinet Makers.
North Broadway next door to
Reporter Office, Tyler, Texas.

            The Subscribers continue to keep on hand a full assortment of Furniture, consisting of Bureaus, Wardrobes, Lounges, Book cases, Cupboards, Sofas, Bedsteads, Washstands, Dining Tables, Toilet tables, and every description of Furniture usually found in the country.
           
Connected with their establishment they have in operation an extensive Cabinet Shop.
           
Orders from a distance will receive prompt attention.
                                               
                                                            Rogers & Sheppard.
Mar. 20, 1861, n26. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Guardians Notice.

            That H. H. Curl, Guardian of Jas. R. Curl, has filed his exhibit for final settlement at the Probate court, to be held at Tyler the last Monday in March this inst., this is therefore to notify all persons interested therein to appear at that time and show cause if any they have why final settlement shall not be had.  Given under my hand and seal of office at Tyler, March 13th, 1861.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman, Clk.
m25ivt. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

New Carriage Manufactory,
In Tyler,
W. L. Johnson & B. Y. Guyer.

            Respectfully informs the citizens of Tyler and Smith county, that he has purchased the Carriage Shop formerly owned by

Booth & Hebierson,

adjoining the Williams' Livery Stable, and is now prepared to fill all orders, from the

Finest Carriage

down to a common Wheel-Barrow.  In a few months I will have connected with my shop a splendid

Blacksmith's Establishment,

and will then be able to do all kinds of work in that line.  My work will be warranted, and no pains will be spared to please all who patronize me.  My terms will be cheap for CASH, and no mistake.  Bring in your orders, and I pledge myself that you will be fully satisfied with my work.  A living share of patronage is respectfully solicited.
           
Oct. 24, 1860 [6-7]                                                             Johnson & Guyer. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Improved Cotton Gins
And Patent Threshing Machine
Manufactory.

            The attention of the public is directed to the superiority of all work done at the above establishment.  The undersigned is now prepared to fill all orders for Cotton Gins, Cotton Cleaners, Threshing Machines and Mills.  Especial attention is paid to the manufacture of and improvements in Cotton Gins.  All Gins warranted to perform well, and to be of the best material and workmanship.  These Gins have a universal celebrity for fast ginning and lint [?] draught.
           
Repairing of all kinds of machinery done at short notice; and repairing of Cotton Gins especially solicited.  All repairing will be done in the best manner for Cash.  All orders will meet with prompt attention.  For any information relating to Cotton Gins, or other agricultural machinery, address
                                               
                                                J. Winship.
Tyler, Texas, May 1st, 1860.  1y 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Home Manufactory.

            The undersigned informs the public that he is prepared to put up

Wool Carding Machines,

according to the most modern style.  He also proposes to repair and set in order these Machines.  Having followed his business for many years, he hopes to give general satisfaction.  Address
                                               
                                                A. M. Elkins,
6-17 6m.                                                                      Troupe, Smith county, Texas. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Blacksmithing,
The Subscriber
has established a new
Blacksmith Shop

in Tyler, on North Broadway, where the public can be accommodated on the shortest order, and most [illegible] terms.  All work guaranteed.
[6-18-1y]            Jan. 22, 1861.                                                   J. M. Douglas. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

"Tyler House."
Tyler, Smith Co., Texas.
J. M. Williams, Proprietor.

            Having taken the above named house which has just been vacated by the former well known lessee, (Rev. A. G. Irvine,), I respectfully solicit a call from its old patrons and friends and the public generally.  Extensive repairs and additions will be immediately made to the Hotel buildings, and comfortable quarters insured to all who may stop with me.  Attached to the Hotel is a large Livery Stable where horses will be well attended to, and at all times travellers can be forwarded to any point, on the shortest notice.
           
Tyler, Dec'r 12, 1860.  1y 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

The Smile.
Lovelady & Davis.
Would respectfully announce to
the citizens of Tyler and visitors
generally, that they have opened
A New Saloon,

on the East side of the Public Square, near the "Holman House," where they have now, and will keep constantly on hand, a large supply of the best

Wines and Liquors,

in the country.  Attentive bar-keepers will always be on hand, to attend to the calls of the thirsty.

Drop in at the "Smile." 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Carolina House.

            The undersigned would respectfully inform the public that they have completed their new

Saloon,

bearing the above title, and have on hand the finest assortment of Liquors and Wines ever brought to this market.  Polite and attentive bar keepers on hand to attend to the wants of the thirsty.  All those disposed to indulge in a "smile" are invited to give us a call.
Tyler, April 25th.                                                                 J. W. Murphy. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Groceries!!!
T. Albertsen & Bro.

Have just received, direct from New Orleans, a large and splendid assortment of

Family Groceries,

Wines, Brandies, Tobacco, Cigars, Sugar, Coffee, etc., etc., which they will sell cheaper for Cash, than any other house in Tyler.
           
All that we ask, is a call, being convinced that we can demonstrate to purchasers that they can obtain

Bargains

at our house.  We shall continue the BAKERY establishment as heretofore. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

Louis Tondeur,
Watch Maker
and Jeweler,
Tyler, Smith County, Texas,

Is fully prepared to execute all work in his line in the best style, and upon the shortest notice.  Particular attention paid to repairing

Clocks, Watches, & Jewelry

and all work full guaranteed.  Extraordinary care given to work from a distance.
Feb. 12 [6-21 6m. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 3

E. Jones, M. D.
Physician & Surgeon.

                                                                                    Tyler, Texas.
           
Office on the East side of the Public Square. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 4-5

A. E. Larkin.                                                    Nath. C. Harris
Larkin & Harris,
(Sign of the Golden Mortar,)
Large Brick building,
North-West Corner Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Drugs,

Medicines, Pure Chemicals, Paints, Oils, Dye Stuffs, Brushes, Stationery, Fancy Articles, &c., &c., all fresh, and selected with the greatest care in the Cities of New York and Philadelphia.                                                                                         v5n23 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 4-5

Felton & Wiggins,
Tyler, Texa. [sic]
Wholesale & Retail Dealers in
Drugs, Oils, Stationery, &c.

We take pleasure in announcing to the public that we are now receiving the largest and finest assortment of Drugs, Paints, Oils, Chemicals, Stationery, Fancy Articles, &c., ever offered in this Market.  We buy of New York Importers, and are thereby enabled to sell (to prompt and reliable purchasers) on good terms.  Every article warranted Fresh and Pure.  We occupy a new brick building on the North side of the Square, adjoining Mr. Woldert.                                                                                                           v5n23 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 4-5

Geo. Yarbrough,
North-East Corner Public Square,
Tyler, Texas,
Wholesale and Retail
Dealer in
Dry Goods,

Of every variety and description.  Saddlery, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, Castings, Hardware, Powder, Shot, &c.                  An examination of my stock is respectfully solicited. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

Administrator's Notice.

            On the 26th day of February, 1861, letters of administration were granted to the undersigned, by the County Court of Smith county, pertaining to the estates of deceased persons, on the estate of Frank M. Rhea, dec'd; this is, therefore, to notify all persons having claims against said estate, to present them for payment within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted to make immediate payment.
                                               
                                    Jo. W. Davenport, Adm'r.
           
v6-23-6w.                                                                  Tyler, Feb. 28, 1861 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

The State of Texas,
Smith County.

            The State of Texas to the Sheriff of Smith County—Greeting:
           
Whereas, Martin Horn and Julius Pabst, have this day filed in the office of the Clerk of the District Clerk of the district court of said county their petition, setting forth, that in the year 1860 they associated themselves together to buy and sell hides and peltrie on speculation, that sometime in December 1860, or Jany, 1861, they shipped to A. M. Hull, H. E. Hull and D. B. Hull, receiving and forwarding merchants in the city of Shreveport, and State of Louisiana, doing business under the name and style of A. M. Hull & Co., eleven bales of hides and peltry to be forwarded to A. D. Donovan, a commission merchant in the city of New Orleans and State of Louisiana, that instead of forwarding the said eleven bales, they disregarded their duty and obligations as such merchants, and appropriated six hundred dollars, a part of the value of said hides to their own use and benefit, and refuse to pay petitioners for the same, wherefore they sue to recover the amount thus appropriated, all cost of suit, and they pray for general relief, and as said A. M. Hull & Co., are non-residents of the State of Texas, they pray for process of service by publication in the Tyler Reporter.
           
You are therefore hereby commanded to summon the said A. M. Hull, H. E. Hull and D. B. Hull, by publication in the Tyler Reporter, a newspaper published in said county of Smith, four consecutive weeks before the return day hereof, to be and personally appear at the court house in the town of Tyler and said county of Smith, on the 17th Monday after the 3d Monday in February A. D. 1861, before the district court, then and there to be held, to answer the complaint of Martin Horn and Julius Pabst as per their petition filed an abstract of which is set forth, and have you then and there, this writ, with your return thereon how you have executed the same.
[Seal] Test. R. B. Long, Clerk of said Court, Given under my hand and seal of office at Tyler this 20th day of March, A.D. 1861.
                                               
                                                R. B. Long, Clk. P. C. S. C.
Received in office the 20th day March 1861.
                                               
                                                Benj. Scott, Shff, S. C. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

H. R. Bethe,
House & Sign Painter,
Tyler, Texas.

            Will do all kinds of work customary in his business, to wit:  House & sign Painting, insured not to crack, Graining, marbling, paper hanging, glazing, &c.  And particularly would he call attention to his new style of his China or French glass finish for parlors, and a new and improved plan of glazing wall paper, which permits it to be washed without injury.  He proposes to do work within Smith county or within 30 miles of Tyler. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 5

Ran Away!

            From the subscriber's lot, in Tyler, last Saturday week, a dark bay Horse, about 18 hands high, has some white saddle marks on his back, both hind feet white, has a scar rather under his breast, shod before, white blaze in his face, about 8 or 9 years old.  When last heard from he was at Mr. Hudnell's, near Epperson's saw-mill.  Any person returning him to me will be paid for the trouble.                          T. Albertsen.
v6n16-tf. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 5

Blacksmithing!
Blacksmithing!

The subscribers have established a new Blacksmith Shop, on the South-east corner of the Public Square, in the building formerly occupied by J. O. Ramsour, (adjourning W. L. Johnson's Carriage Shop,) where it is proposed to do all kinds of work in this line, in the best style and on the shortest notice.  Particularly do the subscribers propose to do

Carriage and Wagon Work.

in a manner unsurpassed for durability, and neatness, by any one in this section.
           
Tyler, Feb. 14 '61 [6-21-                                           Jones & Jack. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 5

Attention!  The World!

            I have bought the entire interest of the "Company" of the firm of J. W. Murphy & Co.  All business hereafter, is to be conducted and transacted under my name.
v6n22 tf                                                                                    J. W. Murphy.
                                               
                                    Tyler, Feb. 12th, 1861 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 5

For Sale—Cheap!

            The property in Tyler, known as the "Federal Court-House," with the two Lots fronting the Baptist Church.  Also the Store-House and Lot now occupied by Messrs. Fleishl & Smith, on the west side of the public square.  Also the place formerly occupied by Col. Wm. Davenport, north of the Court-House, in Tyler, about 30 acres inclosed [sic] by a good plank fence, and 50 acres of timbered land near Mr. Boren's mill will be sold with the place.  Also several tracts of land lying in Smith county, will be sold cheap.  For the prices of the Tyler town property, apply to Geo. W. Bates or F. N. Gary, and for the land apply to Col. J. C. Robertson.  Terms, part cash, and the balance in good paper.  None of this property is encumbered.
v6n16tf                                                                         Peter MacGreal. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 5

House and Ornamental
Painting!
T. L. Dunn,

Having returned to Tyler and located himself, informs the public that his entire attention will be given to his business.  No pains will be spared to execute every piece of work in the very best and latest style, and the employer shall pronounce "satisfied," before the brush leaves any job.  Paper Hanging, Glazing, Imitation of other Wood, and, in fact, any and everything in this line, will be [illegible.] 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 6

S. M. Warner,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Texas.

Will attend to any legal business which may be entrusted to his care in any portion of Eastern Texas.
March 20, 1861 n261y. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 6

Texas Seceded
On the First Day of February,
And the undersigned shortly afterwards enlarged
his business to meet the demand of
the manufactury of every
article made in a
Tin Shop!
In connection with his shop, he has erected a
Hardware Repository,
In which every article of Castings needed in
Southern Confederacy,
Can be found and bought at prices to suit purchasers.
Repairing and Job-Work

Of all kinds in this line, done on the shortest notice and in the best style.  Establishment on the South side Public Square, Tyler.

v6n22-1y                                                                                 M. Horn. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 6
The State of Texas,  }  To any lawful officer of said
County of Smith.       }  County—Greeting:--
You are hereby commanded to summon Joseph Gee, by publication in the Tyler Reporter for three successive weeks, to be and appear before me at my office in Canton, on the last Saturday in March, 1861, to answer the complaint of Jacob H. Brown, in a plea of debt due by note, for four dollars, with legal interest from 1st January, 1860, payable to A. Chevalier; also, in a plea of debt due by account, for eleven 50-100 dollars, payable to J. H. Brown, dated 1860.  Herein fail not to execute and return as the law directs.  Given under my hand, this 9th Feb'ry A. D. 1861.                           R. R. Collier, J. P. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 6
The State of Texas,  }  To any lawful officer of said
County of Smith.      }  county, Greeting:
           
You are hereby commanded to summon J. S. Gee by publication for three successive weeks in the Tyler Reporter, to be and appear before me at Canton, Beat No. 6, on the first Saturday in March 1861 to answer the complaint of Daniel Gillis, in a plea of debt, due as follows:  one note for the sum of Twenty-two 32-100 dollars, due one day after date dated Jan. 26th 1860, and Nine 38-100 dollars as per affidavit, setting forth a lost note, due April 1st, 1859.  Herein fail not to execute and due return make as the law directs.
           
Given under my hand this Feb. 4th 1860.
                                               
                                                J. J. Flinn, J. P.
           
Come to hand 5th Feb. 1861, and a copy handed to the Editors of the Tyler Reporter, with a request to publish the same.                           G. W. Cates, Const. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 6

Saw-Mill.

            The undersigned has removed his Steam Saw-Mill to his new pinery, 8 miles South of Tyler, on the Larrissa road, where, in a few days he will be ready to fill all orders on shortest notice, at the following rates, which are CASH, only.

Prices of Lumber.

Square Lumber per 100                                                                          $1.25
"           "            "            over 20 feet                                                       1.50
Ripped "            "                                                                                      1.50
v5n27 1y                                                                                  J. N. McKinley. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 6

Administrators Notice.

            That on the 21st day of January 1861, M. L. & John Dewberry was appointed Administrator and Administratrix, on the estate of W. F. Smith decd and Letters granted to them.  This is therefore to notify all persons indebted to said estate to come forward and make payment and all those holding claims against said estate to present them in the time prescribed by law, or they will be barred, this March 11th '61.
                                               
                                    Mariah L. Dewberry
                                               
                                    John Dewberry. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

W. H. Cousins,
Wholesale
and Retail
Grocer.
(North west Cor. Public Square,)
Tyler Texas,

Keeps constantly on hand a large and fresh supply of Provisions, in fact every article usually kept in that line, all of which he offers to the public cheaper than has ever before been sold in this market.  His stock consists in part of the following articles.
Coffee,                         Sugar,
                       
Molasses,                    Teas,
                       
            Tobacco,                     Segars,
                                               
                                    Snuff,
           
Wines and Liquors,
                       
            Candies Fruits &c., &c.
Tyler, March 7, 1861.  v6n241y. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

John H. Warren.  M. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler Texas.

Offers his professional services to the public.
Office East side of the public. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

For Sale,
500,000 Feet of
Dry Pine Lumber.

Flooring and Fencing                        per            H            Ft.            $1 00
Ceiling and Weatherboarding              "              "              "                1 00
Sash Lumber and Pailings                   "              "              "                1 25
Framing                                             "               "              "                   75
Sheeting                                             "              "              "                   50
           
The above Lumber was sawed by W. J. Moore, one of the first class sawers and Engineers in Texas, who still stands at the head of affairs.  It was taken from a fresh Pinery, and sawed by new machinery.  Those who may favor me with a call, will find my Lumber carefully stored, and I flatter myself to fill a bill as quick and of as good a quality of Lumber as can be fitted up at any Mill in Eastern Texas.
Give me one call and see for yourselves.  Four miles North-east of Starrville, Smith county.  The above is my Cash Prices, 10 per cent will be added on time.
                                               
                                                R. T. McFarland.
Feb. 7, n201vt. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

J. G. Woldert,
Tyler, Texas,
Importer
And Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Dry Goods, Hosiery, Fancy Goods, Toys, Musical
Instruments, all kinds of Strings, Embroid-
eries, Trimmings, Artificial Flowers,
Jewelry, Cutlery, China
and Bohoemein [sic]
Glass-Ware.

Guns, Pistols, Pictures, Linens, Perfumeries, Combs, Brushes, Willow-Ware, Wines, Cigars, and fine

Smoking Tobacco.

            Having the facilities, and being in connection with some of the first class Factories in Europe enables me to sell as low as in New York.                   v6n21-1y 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Livery Stable.

            The undersigned would respectfully inform the public that they have recently made extensive additions of stable room at their old stand and are now prepared to give the best of attention to Horses entrusted to their care.  Their patrons may rest assured that their stock will be well fed, well curried and well stabled, so long as they are left under our charge.  Careful and attentive Hostlers will always be on hand for this purpose.  WE have lately purchased some fine Livery stock, such as

Horses, Buggies, &c.,

which are for hire, upon the most reasonable terms.  Hacks, with careful drivers, furnished on the shortest notice.  Stable near the South-East corner of the Public Square, adjoining the "Tyler House."
v5n16-1y.                                                                    J. M. & A. C. Williams. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

S. A. Goodman Jr.,
Attorney at Law.

Will practice in the District Courts of the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts:--also in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler.  All business entrusted to his care will receive immediate attention.
           
Jamestown, Smith Co., Texas, Jan. 1, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

D. W. Crow,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Smith County, Texas. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

M. A. Long.                                                     R. B. Hubbard.
Long & Hubbard,
Attorneys at Law,
Tyler, Texas
           
Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial District, and in the U. S. and Federal Courts at Tyler.                                                                        [v5n11-1y] 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

D. D. Capshaw,
Goldsmith & Dentist,
Late of Livingston, Tenn.

is prepared to repair Watches and Jewelry with dispatch.  His skill in the use of instruments in silversmithing, enables him to mount, on gold plate, every complete sets of Artificial teeth, with clasps or by Atmospheric Pressure, and to fill teeth with gold foil, or sponge gold.  His instruments for extracting teeth are of the most approved style now in use.—All work entrusted to his care will be promptly and well executed.
           
Ladies waited on at their residence when de-ed [sic]  Office, Tyler, Texas.  May 1st 1860 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

H. B. Slaughter,
Resident Dentist,

Having located permanently at Tyler, offers his professional services to the citizens of Smith county.  I will visit any section of the adjoining country, whenever those wishing my services will make it to my interest to do so.  My services may be had by addressing me by letter or otherwise I may be found at my office at all times, when not called off professionally.
           
All operations warranted—not only to stand, but to give satisfaction.
           
Refer to any one for whom I have ever performed. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Dr. Warren & Jones,

Having associated themselves together in the practice of the various branches of their profession, tender their professional services to the citizens of Smith county.  They hope by prompt attention to business, to merit the continued patronage of their friends.  Special attention will be given to Surgery, and the diseases of Females and Children.  Where the attention of both is necessary, in consultation extra charges will not be made.
           
Office on the East side of the Public Square, at Dr. Warren's old stand, where one or both may always be found, unless professionally absent.
                                               
                                    John H. Warren, M. D.
                                               
                                    E. Jones, M. D.
           
January 11, 1860                                                                                  v5n19—tf 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Davenport & Goodman,
Physicians & Surgeons,
Tyler, Texas,

Will promptly answer to all calls in the line of their profession.  They have formed a partnership for the practice of Medicine and Surgery, and will be found at all time, (unless professionally absent,) at the Drug Store of Davenport & Co., in the brick building on the North-West corner of the Public Square.  The attention of both will be given in all cases when necessary, without additional charge.
                                               
                                    Jo. W. Davenport, M. D.
                                               
                                    Wm. J. Goodman, M. D. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Dr. R. A. Felton,

Respectfully offers his services in the practice of the several branches of his profession, to the citizens of Tyler and the surrounding vicinity.  Office at the Drug Store. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Geo. W. Chilton.                                                J. F. Warren.
Chilton & Warren.

Will practice as Attorneys at Law, in the counties composing the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts, in the State of Texas, and also in the Supreme and Federal Courts, at Tyler, or any other courts of the State where the importance of the case justify them in leaving their immediate Districts.
           
Address the firm at Tyler, Texas.
           
March 17, 1858—v3n27 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
Tyler, Smith county, Texas, June 17, 1856.
v1n16-tf 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Stephen Reaves,
Attorney at Law,

Will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Courts, of the Western District of Texas.
           
Office, at Tyler.
sept 7, 1854/                                                                            v1m1 tf 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

W. S. Herndon.
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Texas,

Will practice in the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts; and also in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler.                                                                        [6-8] 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Dr. U. G. M. Walker,
Physician,
Surgeon & Obstetrician,
Office first door east of the Holman House.
Tyler, Smith Co., Texas.

v5n52-1y 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

W. J. Lawrence, M. D.                                R. A. Felton, M. D.
Drs. Lawrence & Felton.
Physicians, Surgeons and Accouchers.

            Office—At the Drug Store of Felton & Wiggins.  At night Dr. Lawrence may be found at his residence—the house formerly occupied by Mr. G. W. Bates.  North-west corner of the Public Square.                                                            v6-7 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Sky-Light
Photographic & Ambrotype
Rooms,
[Over O. Kolstad's Jewelry Store.]
Tyler, Texas.
J. M. Hill, Artist.

            Takes great pleasure in announcing to the citizens of Tyler, and the public generally that he has permanently located at this place, and having furnished his rooms with every appliance of the Art, and believing himself complete master of his business, he asks a liberal patronage from all.  His rooms are furnished with all the [illegible] and conveniences of a parlor, and all the ladies especially are invited to call and examine specimens &c.  No department of this beautiful art is [illegible] 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 5

C. S. Mail Line
Between Tyler and Nacogdoches.

            The undersigned would inform the traveling public that he continues to run a line of two horse hacks between Tyler and Nacogdoches, and will make regular Tri-Weekly Trips between these two points.  Comfortable Hacks, good horses and safe drivers will be kept constantly on the line.
           
This line connects regularly with the route from Nacogdoches to Alexandria and also to Austin.
           
Leaves Tyler every Sunday, Wednesday, and Friday.  Leaves Nacogdoches every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.

Rates of Fare.

From Tyler to Nacogdoches                                                   $8.00
"           "            Canton                                                            1.50
"           "            Knoxville                                                         2.50
"           "            Griffin                                                              3.00
"           "            Salem.                                                             4.00
"           "            Linn Flat.                                                         6.50
                                               
            E. Huston, Proprietor. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 6

Texas Baptist
College.

The exercises of this Institution will commence in the town of Tyler, on the 1st Monday in February, 1861.  As many are aware, this College was located at the last Session of the Eastern Baptist Convention, and the undersigned were elected to take charge of it.  We would say, that we will not disappoint the confidence our brethren have put in us, backed by the experience of years in the School-room, and is sanguine in the hope of giving general satisfaction to those who may patronize us.  We have secured the large brick building erected by the Masonic fraternity in which to commence.  Board can be had in the town, in good families, at $10.00 per month, including washing and fuel.  As soon as a reaction takes place in monetary affairs, the brethren design building a commodious Boarding House upon the College premises.  The exercises will be divided into two Sessions, each five months:--First Session commencing 1st Monday in February, and ending the last June; Second commencing the 1st Monday in September, and ending the last of January.

Rates of Tuition.

Primary Class—per annum                                                  $20.00
Preparatory,        "            "                                                   40.00
Collegiate,           "            "                                                   50.00
College Matriculation Fee,                                                       5.00
Incidental Expenses,                                                                 2.00
           
Pupils will be charged from the time of entrance to the end of the Session.  No deduction will be made except in cases of protracted sickness.
                                               
                                    Wm. B. Featherston,
v6-n18-1y.                                                                   J. R. Clark. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 11, 1861, p. 4, c. 6

English & Classical
Seminary,
For Boys and Girls.

            The next term of the Institution, in charge of the undersigned, will be opened for the reception of pupils on the First Monday in February, 1861.  Competent Assistants will be employed when the interests of the school demand it.

Terms of Tuition per Month.

Orthography, Reading, Penmanship                                                     $2.00
Arithmetic, Eng. Grammar, Geography, &c.                                          3.00
Higher English Branches, Mathematics, Latin and Greek                        4.00
           
Each pupil will be required top ay an Incidental Fee of One Dollar upon entering.
           
The Principal having devoted eleven years to teaching, hopes to receive a liberal share of patronage.  Every reasonable effort will be made to give ample satisfaction both to pupils and patrons.
                                               
                                    B. Frank Humphreys.
v6-n15.                                                                                    Tyler, Jan. 1st, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter
Is published every Thursday,
by W. F. Hamilton & Co.,
At $2,50 per Annum;

And gives more and later news than any other paper in Eastern Texas.
           
Having reached a circulation far superior to that ever before enjoyed by any paper in Tyler, the Reporter offers the best advantages to advertisers.
           
Extras are promptly issued whenever the news is important. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 1

Professional Cards. 

D. W. Crow,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Smith County, Texas. 

M. A. Long.                                                     R. B. Hubbard,
Attorneys at Law,
Tyler, Texas

Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial District, and in the U. S. and Federal Courts at Tyler.                                                                                                [v5n41-1y]   

Geo. W. Chilton.                                                J. F. Warren.
Chilton & Warren,

Will practice as Attorneys at Law, in the counties composing the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts, in the State of Texas, and also in the Supreme and Federal Courts, at Tyler, or any other Courts of the State where the importance of the case justify them in leaving their immediate Districts.
           
Address the firm at Tyler, Texas.
March 17, 1858—v3n27 

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
           
Tyler, Smith county, Texas, June 17, 1856.
v1n46-tf 

Stephen Reaves,
Attorney at Law,

Will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Courts, of the Western District of Texas.
           
Office at Tyler.
sept. 6, 1854                                                                                                    v1n1-tf 

Donley & Anderson.
Attorneys at Law,

Will practice in the District Courts of the Counties of Nacogdoches, Houston, Anderson, Henderson, Kaufman, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur, Panola, Rusk, Cherokee and Smith; and in the Federal and Supreme Courts at Tyler.  Address S. P. Donley, Tyler, Smith county, Texas; James M. Anderson, Rusk, Cherokee county, Texas.
                                               
                                                                        [6-33-1y. 

W. S. Herndon,
Attorney at Law,
Tyler, Texas,

Will practice in the 6th and 9th Judicial Districts; and also in the Supreme and Federal Courts at Tyler.                                                -6-8] 

S. M. Warner,
Attorney at Law.
Tyler, Texas.

            Will attend to any legal business which may be entrusted to his care in any portion of Eastern Texas.
           
mar. 20, 1861 n261y

 

Davenport & Goodman,
Physicians & Surgeons,
Tyler, Texas,

Will promptly answer to all calls in the line of their profession.  They have formed a partnership for the practice of Medicine and Surgery, and will be found at all time, (unless professionally absent,) at the Drug Store of Davenport & Co., in the brick building on the North-west corner of the Public Square.  The attention of both will be given in all cases when necessary, without additional charge.
                                               
                                                Jo. W. Davenport, M. D.
                                               
                                                Wm. J. Goodman, M. D. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 2

M. J. Lawrence, M. D.                                R. A. Felton, M. D.
Drs. Lawrence & Felton,
Physicians, Surgeons and
Accouchers.

            Office—At the Drug Store of Felton & Wiggins.  At night Dr. Lawrence may be found at his residence—the house formerly occupied by Mr. G. W. Bates—North-West corner of the Public Square. 

D. D. Capshaw,
Goldsmith & Dentist,

                                                                                    Late of Livingston, Tenn.
Is prepared to repair Watches and Jewelry with dispatch.  His skill in the use of instruments in silversmithing, enables him to mount, on gold plate, very complete sets of Artificial teeth, with clasps or by Atmospheric Pressure and to fill teeth with told foil, or sponge gold.  His instruments for extracting teeth are of the most approved style now in use.—All work entrusted to his care will be promptly and well executed.
           
Ladies waited on at their residence when desired.  Office, Tyler, Texas.  May 1st, 1860. 

H. B. Slaughter,
Resident Dentist,

Having located permanently at Tyler, offers his professional services to the citizens of Smith county.  I will visit any section of the adjoining country, whenever those wishing my services will make it to my interest to do so.  My services may be had by addressing me by letter or otherwise.  I may be found at my office at all times, when not called off professionally.
           
All operations warranted—not only to stand, but to give satisfaction.
           
Refer to any one for whom I have ever performed. 

Dr. U. G. M. Walker,
Physician,
Surgeon & Obstetrician,
Office first floor east of the Holman House.
Tyler, Smith Co., Texas.

v5n52-1y 

E. Jones, M. D.
Physician & Surgeon,

                                                                                                                        Tyler, Texas.
Will continue to devote his entire attention to the practice of the various branches of his profession.  Office on the South side of the public square, No. 2 east of Broadway, where may always be found unless professionally absent. 

J. H. Warren, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler, Texas,

            Offers his professional services to the public.
           
Office East side of the public. 

F. M. Hays,
Attorney & Counsellor at Law.
Tyler Smith Co., Texas.

            Business entrusted to him will be promptly attended to.                  v6n231y. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 3

TEXAS BAPTIST
COLLEGE.

The exercises of this Institution will commence in the town of Tyler, on the 1st Monday in February, 1861.  As many are aware, this College was located at the last Session of the Eastern Baptist Convention, and the undersigned were elected to take charge of it.  We would say, that we will not disappoint the confidence our brethren have put in us, to make it a first class College.  Each of us is backed by the experience of years in the  School-room, and is sanguine in the hope of giving general satisfaction to those who may patronize us.  We have secured the large brick building erected by the Masonic fraternity in which to commence.  Board can be had in the town, in good families, at $10.00 per month, including washing and fuel.  As soon as a reaction takes place in monetary affairs, the brethren design building a commodious Boarding House upon the College premises.  The exercises will be divided into two Sessions, each five months:--First Session commencing 1st Monday in February, and ending the last June; Second commencing the 1st Monday in September, and ending the last of January.

Rates of Tuition.

Primary Class—per annum                                                  $20.00
Preparatory            "            "                                                 40.00
Collegiate                                                                               50.00
College Matriculation Fee                                                         5.00
Incidental expenses                                                                   2.00
           
Pupils will be charged from the time of entrance to the end of the Session.  No deduction will be made except in cases of protracted sickness.
                                               
                                                Wm. B. Featherston,
                                               
                                                J. R. Clark
v6-n18-1y 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 3

Better Than Ever.
Sky Light Ambrotype
Gallery.
R. E. Curlee, Artist

Has fitted up his well known Gallery with a Sky Light, and will take pictures, either Ambrotypes or Melainotypes and likenesses on patent leather or paper as cheap, if not a little cheaper, and equal to anybody's pictures.  He has resided here for several years, and now that Texas has seceded, he expects to remain right here.
Feby.27th 1861-n231y. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 3

Attention, Soldiery!

We beg leave to inform the public that we are just in receipt of a new lot of fine and pure

Drugs & Chemicals,

and are prepared to fill all orders with promptness.  Those wishing to purchase Drugs will do well to give us a call before buying elsewhere.
                                               
                                                Larkin & Harris.
                                               
                                                            Tyler, May 24, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 4

Heavy Loss to Capt. Good's Artillery.

            We regret to learn that Capt. Good, of Greer's regiment, while on the way from Dallas to Fort Smith, lost 2500 pounds of powder in crossing Red River.
           
The dispatch says that the powder wagon, in attempting to cross the river, stalled, and was abandoned for the night; and that during the night a sudden and tremendous rise came down and swept off the wagon with its entire contents.  We suppose it was the artillery powder. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 1, c. 5
           
See the cutting advertisement of John A. Smith.  If anybody complains hereafter about arms, knives especially, send them to him, at the shop of Messrs. Adams.  Any sort of size that may be wanted can be had, and they are cheap and well made.  Mr. Smith is entitled to much credit for his efforts in this matter. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

A Suggestion—Our Arms.

            On Monday next a general collection of the people of the county will take place at the different polls.  Would it not be a very suitable time for ascertaining the condition of the county as regards arms?  Are we sufficiently armed?  If not, how many do we lack?  If an attempt is made to invade our State, will we be ready and prepared to meet it?  These facts should be investigated and known.  In order to do so, we suggest that the Captains or other officers of the military companies organized in the different Precincts in the county, and where no company is organized, by the Justice of the Peace or Constable, make, or cause to be made, an inventory of every gun in the county.  This can be done with a little effort, and would certainly afford information which we very much need.  Let them take a report of the number, kind and condition of the arms, make out their report and forward to the Chief Justice or some other public officer of the county, any of whom will, no doubt, take great pleasure in receiving and collating a full report of the same. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 2, c. 5

The Planters' Loan.

            We understand that Col. Hubbard, agent to procure the "Planter's Loan," in this and some of the surrounding counties, has been actively engaged, as far as sickness in his family would permit, in presenting this subject to the planters.  But the farmers being so busily engaged in securing their small grain and fodder crops, we suppose they have not generally attended the public gatherings where this subject has been introduced. . . . 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 2, c. 5

A Camp of Instruction in Smith County.

            We learn from Maj. Earle, just in from Camp Locke, that Capts. Brown and Smith, of the Rusk and Smith county companies, have determined to establish a Camp in this county, for the purpose of regimental drill.  All organized companies in the sixth Military District are not only requested, but solicited to attend, on or before the 15th inst.  The following named gentlemen have been chosen to select a suitable place for the Camp, viz:  W. W. Ross, Dr. M. J. Lawrence, Frank Ross, and A. A. Holt.  We understand that Capt. Brown is authorized by Col. Locke to form a regiment or Battalion as soon as a sufficient number of Companies attend. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
(Communicated.)
           
Messrs. Editors:
                       
Thinking that probably a short account of the two days occupied in the Examination of Prof. Wilcoxon's School at Starville [sic], and also of the concerts at night, under the supervision of Prof. J. B. Norman, might be of some interest to your numerous readers, I submit the following to your command.
           
All that can be said for the school, or for the manner in which the scholars acquitted themselves on the examination occasion, may be "quickly said."  The school is a first-class one, and under the management of Prof. Wilcoxon, is eminently qualified for the thorough advancement of pupils, and for giving them a finished education, in the shortest possible time; then, the locality of the institution is unexceptionable—healthy, retired and pleasant; situated as it is, among people whose refinement and liberality is proverbial.
           
On the occasion to which I particularly allude (the 24th and 25th) the scholars displayed the greatest proficiency, answering all questions propounded with a promptness truly astonishing.  The examination continued two days, and I have never witnessed a more thorough success.
           
Each night, the vast multitudes which assembled at the Concert rooms were regaled with the most soul-stirring melody from the different instruments, as they were touched by the beautiful fingers of Prof. Norman's pupils—sending forth on the soft southern air strains of the most ravishing sweetness.  It is unnecessary for me to say anything commendatory of Prof. Norman as a music teacher; for he is so well known, and his merits so fully appreciated, that it is entirely useless.  Suffice it to say, that he is the prince of musicians, and knows how to impart that knowledge to others.
           
On the last day, (Thursday) there was a most magnificent dinner prepared for all who were present.  It was truly a sumptuous affair, and when with hundreds of others I was partaking, I was struck with the belief that no place in the State could go ahead of Starrville.                                                          A Visitor. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
           
Thanks to Mr. J. M. Hill for files of late papers in advance of the mails.
           
Also, to Mrs. Stephen Reaves for some fine English Grapes. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

Not So Bad.

            The Dallas Herald, of the 24th inst., contains a letter from Capt. J. J. Good, in which he gives a detailed account of the march of Col. Greer's Regiment from Dallas to a few miles North of Red River, where the letter was written.  He gives a full description of the difficulties they experienced in crossing Red River, which shows that the result was not so bad as we heard a few days ago.  It appears that Good's Company lost nothing there being nothing lost except Capt. Harris' baggage wagon.
           
We give the following extract from the letter:
           
"One gun and caisson passed over [the river], when I received orders to halt the ballance [sic] of the battery on this side, and let the train pass us.  As it was impossible for us to cross until late at night, we were further ordered to camp on the bar, some of the boys bathing, others cooking, and all amusing themselves generally; when to the astonishment of all, and without any apparent cause whatever, old Red commenced rising.  Our sand bar was at least four feet above the level of the river.  The assembly was sounded, the order was given to pack up and hitch in horses.  In ten minutes after the order was given, Lieut. Douglas' section wheeled out of Park and made for the high bank.  The others moved up beautifully, but an unexpected accident for a while stopped everything.  There were several baggage wagons on the bar waiting for the boat; the order was given them to vamoose to the high ground but there was but one narrow wagon way up the hill—the bar around this was choked up with baggage wagons, and we had to wait on them.  The last one stalled right at the foot of the bank.  After several efforts about fifty men put their shoulders to the wheels and rolled it up.            *            *            *            *
           
Everything was saved, except Capt. Harris' baggage wagon.  It and all his papers were a total loss.     *            *  Among other things, the wagon contained several thousands of fixed ammunition for small arms. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

Editorial Correspondence.

                                                                                    Boggy Depot, C. N.            }
                                               
                                    July 19, 1861.                     }
Dear Reporter:
           
Since writing you last, we have moved up to this point, without encountering difficulties.  We are constantly in receipt of exciting news from Missouri, accounts of which you will have received before this reaches you.  We are to have a spirited time in the South Kansas Division.  On last evening a man claiming to be a messenger from McCulloch arrived in camps.  He said he was sent with dispatches to Gen. Childs, who was authorized to raise a regiment.  His story and the circumstances contributed to throw suspicion on him, and he has been taken prisoner.  It will be remembered that a man named Childs has tendered a regiment to Lyon, the Federal General.  It is possible that this regiment was to have been taken from some of the Indian tribes above this.  This prisoner may be honest; if so he can demonstrate it at Fort Smith.  If he fails to do so, he will be shot as a spy.  The Chocktaws [sic] and  Chickasaws are full of the war spirit.  A war-dance is on hand at this place to-night.  The soldiers are anxious to see it, but it is though imprudent for them to attend.  A regiment of 700 Chocktaws [sic], under Col. Cooper, left this place for Fort Smith on the 10th inst.  All the tribes of the Nation have concluded a treaty with the Confederate State, except the Cherokees.  It is doubtful what they will do.  There is a disposition on the part of the Indians to enter the  Confederacy as States.  They think they can sustain their rights under our States Rights Constitution.
           
I send papers containing all the news from the seat of war I am permitted to publish.
           
In haste,                                                   J. P. Douglas. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
           
Terry and Lubbock are on their way home to raise a regiment of mounted rangers for service in Virginia.  Here is a chance for the Texas boys.—Houston Telegraph. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 1

More Men.

            The Richmond correspondent of the Picayune writes to that paper as follows:
           
"Major Hal. Sibley, late of the United States Dragoons, has received the appointment of a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army, and is ordered to the State of Texas with instructions to form a brigade of cavalry.  He leaves to-morrow."
           
From the Houston Telegraph we learn that this brigade is intended for the defence of our Northern frontier. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4-5

Geo. Yarbrough,
North-East Corner Public Square.
Tyler, Texas.
Wholesale and Retail
Dealer in
Dry Goods.

Of every variety and description.  Saddlery, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, Castings, Hardware, Powder, Shot, &c.  An examination of my stock is respectfully solicited. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4-5

Felton & Wiggins,
Tyler, Texas.
Wholesale & Retail Dealers in
Drugs, Oils, Stationery, &c.

We take pleasure in announcing to the public that we are now receiving the largest and finest assortment of DRUGS, PAINTS, OILS, CHEMICAL, STATIONERY, FANCY ARTICLES, &c., ever offered in this Market.  We buy of New York importers, and are thereby able to sell (to prompt and reliable purchasers) on good terms.  Every article warranted FRESH and PURE.  We occupy a new brick building on the North side of the Square, and adjoining Mr. Woldert.                                                                       v5n23 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4-5

A. E. Larkin.                                        Nath. C. Harris.
Larkin & Harris,
(Sign of the Golden Mortar,)
Large Brick Building,
North-West Corner, Public Square,
Tyler, Texas.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Drugs.

Medicines, Pure Chemicals, Paints, Oils, Dye Stuffs, Brushes, Stationery, Fancy Articles, &c., &c.—all fresh and selected with the greatest care in the Cities of New York and Philadelphia. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

Confederate Bonds
Wanted!

We will take Confederate Bonds in payment of debts due us, or falling due the 1st of January next.

                                                                                                Boren & Douglas,
6-12-6t.                                                                                               Tyler, Aug. 1, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

War!  War!  War!
Knives!  Knives!

            The cry is "Where can we get Arms?" and to answer this question I have manufactured a fine lot of KNIVES, and can satisfy the taste of any Southern man, and disgust and Yankee now alive.
           
Call round at J. C. Short's Gun Shop, and see for yourselves.
                                               
                                                John A. Smith. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

Administrators Notice.

            That letters of administration were granted to J. C. Benson and Geo. C. Cancellor, on the Estate of Daniel Cancellor, dec'd at the Probate Court, held at Tyler on the 29th of July, 1861; this is therefore to notify all persons indebted to said estate to come forward and make payment, and all those having claims against said estate will present them as the Statute requires, and in the time proscribed by law.
                                               
                                                John C. Benson
                                               
                                                Geo. C. Cancellor, Adm'r. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

Administrators Notice.

            That on the 29th day of April, A.D. 1861, at the Probate Court of Smith County, held at Tyler, letters of administration were granted to S. D. Waits on the Estate of John B. Waits, dec'd, this is therefore to notify all persons interested therein to present their claims as the law directs, and all those indebted to said estate will please come forward and make payment immediately if not sooner.
           
July 29, 61 [6-42-4t]                                                     S. D. Waites, Admr. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 4

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by Thos. J. Adams, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. in Precinct No. 1, one work OX, a white ox, with yellow and white neck and head, about five years old, marked with a crop and split in the right, and an under slope and under bit in the left ear, and branded on the left hip with the letter O, and appraised at twenty dollars.
           
July 30 '61                                                                   R. W. Chapman, Clk. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 5

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by Thos. H. Weatherly, and estrayed before Jas. Q. Flinn, J. P. in Precinct No. 6, one large flea-bitten gray Horse, about 12 or 14 years old, and appraised at fifty dollars.
           
June 24, 1861                                                                      R. W. Chapman, Clk. 

The State of Texas               }To any lawful officer of said
           
County of Smith       }County, Greeting:
           
You are hereby commanded to summon J. H. Morgan by publication in the Tyler Reporter, for three successive weeks to appear before R. R. Collier J.P. in Beat No. 6, on the last Saturday in July 1861 to answer complaint of Robert Engledow, plaintiff in attachment in a plea of debt by account for the sum of Forty-eight dollars and ninety-seven cents, payable to Robert Engledow and dated 1860 and 1861.  Herein fail not and due return make as the law directs.  Given under my hand this 22d day of June 1861.
                                               
                                    J. C. Q. Flinn, J. P.
           
Came to hand the day issued, handed to editor of Tyler Reporter for publication, July 4th 1861.
                                               
                                    G. W. Cates, Cons't. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by P. H. Steifer, and estrayed before Ben Brandon, J. P. in Precinct No. 2, one Ox, medium size, white body with some blue spots on his sides, neck and head, and black legs up to his knees.  Marked with a split and under hack in the left ear crop and underhack in the right ear and about nine years old, no brands.  Appraised at $18.00.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman, Clk.
July 4th 't1. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Administrators Notice.

            That Daniel Gillis, Administrator on the estate of Wm. H. Griffin, deceased, has filed his account and vouchers for final settlement of said estate at the Probate Court to be held at Tyler on the last Monday in July next 1861, this is therefore to notify all persons interested therein to appear at that time and show cause if any they have why the same shall not be granted, and a final discharge granted.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman, Clk.
June 27th 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Notice!

            All persons are hereby forewarned not to extend credit to the late firm of Horn & Pabst, entered into sometime last year, for the purpose of buying and selling Hides on speculation.  I shall treat all such contracts as null and void as to myself.
                                               
                                    Julius Pabst.
                                               
                        Tyler, Texas June 26th 1861 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by Polly Harpole, and estrayed before Louis Sparkman, J. P. in Precinct No. 10, Smith County, one Work OX, a light Brindle, marked with a crop off of each ear, an under bit in the right, and about 6 years old, and appraised at twenty dollars.
                                               
                                                R. W. Chapman. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

Notice—Look Out!

            I hereby warn all persons against trading for a certain promissory note, made to J. W. Ellis, for the sum of $85 85/100, dated June 17th, 1861, and made payable Jan'y 1, 1862, signed D. Y. Gaines, by Isabella Gaines.  For sufficient reasons, I do not intend to pay it.                          D. Y. Gaines.
                                               
                                                June 29th, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 3, c. 7

The Very Latest!
In 16 Miles of Tyler!

            On Saturday, the 10th of August, 1861, at my residence, 16 miles North of Tyler, I will sell, for cash in hand, 280 acres of LAND, including my farm and residence—40 acres in cultivation—60 acres of bottom land, in the trace; the very best land, timber and water; on a public road, and title as good as the State can make.
           
Come and look, and you are sure to like.  Also the present growing crop; a splendid lot of milch cows and stock cattle; sheep, hogs, household and kitchen furniture, farming utensils, &c, &c.  A note shaver [sic?] can do well to attend on that day.
July 2d, 1861.                                                                                       T. J. Taylor. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

To Arms!  To Arms!!
J. C. Short.

Would respectfully return his thanks to the public for their liberal patronage heretofore extended to him, and inform the Southern people that he is still manufacturing some of those fine Kentucky Rifles warranted to kill an

Abolitionist 400 Yards!

He also manufactures superior Double Barrel Rifles and Shot Guns, and has just opened a fine lot of Colt's Repeating Pistols, English Repeaters, Derrenger [sic] Pistols, and a variety of single Pistols, Bowie Knives, Shot Bags, Powder Flasks, Game Bags, Patent Wadding, Dram Bottles &c.  Also keeps on hand a good lot of double and single Shot Guns.
           
A fine lot of Caps, Powder and Lead, and everything usually kept in the gun Maker's line—all of which will be sold to suit the hard times,

Repairing,

of all kinds in the Gun line, attended to with neatness and dispatch, and all work warranted.  Shop on the East side of the Square.  Tyler, Texas. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

Sky-Light
Photographic & Ambrotype
Rooms,
[Over O. Kolstad's Jewelry Store.]
Tyler, Texas.
J. M. Hill, Artist.

Takes great pleasure in announcing to the citizens of Tyler, and the public generally, that he has permanently located at this place, and having furnished his rooms with every appliance of the Art, and believing himself complete master of his business, he asks a liberal patronage from all.  His rooms are furnished with all the business and conveniences of a parlor, and all the ladies especially, are invited to call and examine specimens &c.  No department of this beautiful art is misunderstood, but entire satisfaction guaranteed in every case.
           
January 30th, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

"Tyler House."
Tyler, Smith Co. Texas
J. M. Williams, Proprietor

            Having taken the above named house which has just been vacated by its former well known lessee, (Rev. A. G. Irvine,) I respectfully solicit a call from its old patrons and friends, and the public generally,  Extensive repairs and additions will be immediately made to the Hotel buildings, and comfortable quarters insures to all who may stop with me.  Attached to the Hotel is a large Livery Stable, where horses will be well attended to and at all times travellers can be forwarded to any point, on the shortest notice.
           
Tyler, Dec'r 12, 1860. 1y 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

H. R. Bethe,
House & Sign Painter,
Tyler Texas.

            Will do all kinds of work customary in his business, to-wit:  House & Sign Painting, insured not to crack, Graining, marbling, paper hanging, glazing, &c.  And particularly would he call attention to his new style of his China or French glass finish for parlors, and a new and improved plan of glazing wall paper, which permits it to be washed without injury.  He proposes to do work within Smith county or within 30 miles of Tyler.
           
Mar. 7, 1861. n241y. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 1

300,000
Fall and Winter
Goods.

            I am now in receipt of my Fall and Winter stock; the stock complete, and consisting in part as follows:
A General Stock Dry Goods;
N. C. Jeans, and Casimeres;
Gents and Boys Clothing;
Ladies' Cloaks; Hardware;
Sausage Grinders; Cutlery;
Guns, Axes, &c.
Boots and Shoes, Russets, Kip
Brogans, Ladies'
Goat Boots, &c.
School Books,
Stationery, Pens, Pencils, &c.
Yankee Notions, Jewelry, Clocks,
Mouse-Traps, &c.
Drugs, & Medicines, a good stock
constantly on hand.
Crockery and Glass Ware, a complete stock.
&c., &c., &c.
All of which were selected in person, and bought on the most favorable terms, to which I invite the special attention of all persons through the surrounding country who wish to purchase.  Give me a call, as superior inducements are offered, both in price and quality.
Oct. 5th, 1860 [6-7]                                                                Geo. Yarbrough. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 2

House and Ornamental
Painting!
T. L. Dunn,

Having returned to Tyler, and located himself, informs the public that his entire attention will be given to his business.  No pains will be spared to execute every piece of work in the very best and latest style, and the employer shall pronounce "satisfied," before his brush leaves any job.  Paper-Hanging, Glazing, Imitations of other Wood, and, in fact, any and everything in this line, will be promptly attended to. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 2

Saw-Mill.

            The undersigned has removed his Steam Saw-Mill to his new pinery, 8 miles South of Tyler, on the Larissa road, where, in a few days he will be ready to fill all orders on shortest notice, at the following rates, which are CASH, only.

Prices of Lumber.

Square Lumber per 100                                                            $1.25
"           "            "            over 20 feet                                          1.50
Ripped "            "                                                                         1.50
v5n2617                                                                                   J. N. McKinley. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 2

New Spring & Summer Goods.
If you Want Good Bargains, Go To
Fleishl & Smith,
They Are Now Receiving Their
New Stock of
Spring and Summer
Goods,

Which they offer at exceeding low Figures for CASH, or to punctual paying Customers on time.
           
Call around at the NEW BRICK STORE, South side Public Square, and examine for yourself.
           
Tyler, March 27th 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 2

For Sale—Cheap!

            The property in Tyler, known as the "Federal Court-House," with the two Lots fronting the Baptist Church.  Also the Store-House and Lot now occupied by Messrs. Fleishl & Smith, on the west side of the public square.  Also the place formerly occupied by Col. Wm. Davenport, north of the Court House in Tyler, about 30 acres inclosed [sic] by a good plank fence, and 50 acres of timbered land near Mr. Boren's will be sold with the place.  Also several tracts of land lying in Smith county, will be sold cheap.  For the prices of the Tyler town property, apply to Geo. W. Bates or F. N. Gary, and for the land apply to Col. J. C. Robertson.  Terms, part cash, and the balance in good paper.  None of this property is encumbered.
           
v6n16tf                                                                         Peter MacGreal. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

Rogers & Sheppard,
Furniture Merchants
and
Cabinet Makers.
North Broadway next door to
Reporter Office, Tyler Texas.

            The Subscribers continue to keep on hand a full assortment of Furniture consisting of Bureaus, Wardrobes, Lounges, Book cases, Cupboards, Sofas, Bedsteads, Washstands, Dining Tables, Toilet tables, and every description of Furniture usually found in the country.
           
Connected with their establishment, they have in operation an extensive Cabinet Shop.
           
Orders from a distance will receive prompt attention.
                                               
                                                Rogers & Sheppard.
           
Mar. 20, 1861, n26 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

New Carriage Manufactory,
In Tyler.
W. L. Johnson & B. Y. Guyer.

Respectfully informs the citizens of Tyler and Smith county, that he has purchased the Carriage Shop formerly owned by

Booth and Hebierson,

adjoining the Williams' Livery Stable, and is now prepared to fill all orders, from the

Finest Carriage

down to a common Wheel-Barrow.  In a few months I will have connected with my shop a splendid

Blacksmith's Establishment.

and will then be able to do all kinds of work in that line.  My work will be warranted, and no pains will be spared to please all who patronize me.  My terms will be cheap for Cost, and no mistake.  Bring in your orders, and I pledge myself that you will be fully satisfied with my work.  A living share of patronage is respectfully solicited.
           
Oct. 24, 1860 [6-7]                                                             Johnson & Guyer. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

Improved Cotton Gins
And Patent Threshing Machine
Manufactory.

            The attention of the public is directed to the superiority of all work done at the above establishment.  The undersigned is now prepared to fill all orders for Cotton Gins, Cotton Cleaners, Threshing Machines, and Mills.  Especial attention is paid to the manufacture of an improvements in cotton Gins.  All Gins warranted to perform well, and to be of the best material and workmanship.  These gins have a universal celebrity for fast ginning and light draught.
           
Repairing of all kinds of machinery done at short notice; and repairing of Cotton Gins especially solicited.  All repairing will be done in the best manner for Cash.  All orders will meet with prompt attention.  For any information relating to Cotton Gins, or other agricultural machinery, address
                                               
                                                J. Winship.
Tyler, Texas, May 1st, 1860-1y 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

Home Manufactor.

            The undersigned informs the public that he is prepared to put up

Wool Carding Machines,

according to the most modern style.  He also proposes to repair and set in order these Machines.  Having followed his business for many years, he hopes to give general satisfaction.  Address
                                               
                                                A. M. Elkins,
6-17-6m                                                                                  Troupe, Smith county, Texas. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

Black-Smithing.
The Subscriber
has established a new
Blacksmith Shop

in Tyler, on North Broadway, where the public can be accommodated on the shortest notice, and most reasonable terms.  All work guaranteed.
Jan. 22, 1861.                                                                                      J. M. Douglas. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

W. H. Cousins
Wholesale
and Retail
Grocer.
(North west Cor. Public Square.)
Tyler Texas,

Keeps constantly on hand a large and fresh supply of Provisions, in fact every article usually kept in that line, all of which he offers to the public cheaper than has ever before been sold in this market.  His stock consists in part of the following articles:
Coffee,             Sugar,
           
Molasses,        Teas,
                       
Tobacco,         Segars,
                       
            Snuff,
           
Wines and Liquors,
                       
Candies, Fruits &c. &c.
Tyler, March 7, 1861.  v6n241y 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 3

War a Certainty.

            Know all men by these presents, that undoubtedly I have declared, and do declare that I neither go SECURITY nor lend my horse.  Persons by reading this can save a needless expenditure of wind.
           
no31tf                                                                                      J. W. Murphy. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 4

Texas Seceded
On the First Day of February,
And the undersigned shortly afterwards enlarged
his business to meet the demand for
the manufactory of every
article made in a
Tin Shop!
In connection with his shop, he has erected a
Hardware Repository,
In which every article of Castings needed in
Southern Confederacy,
Can be found and bought at prices to suit purchasers.
Repairing and Job-Work
Of all kinds in this line, done on the shortest notice
and in the best style.  Establishment on the South
side Public Square, Tyler.
v6n22-17                                                                                             M. Horn. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 4

Livery Stable.

            The undersigned would respectfully inform the public that they have recently made extensive additions of stable room at their old stand, and are now prepared to give the best of attention to Horses entrusted to their care.  Their patrons may rest assured that their stock will be well fed, well curried and well stabled, so long as they are left under our charge.  Careful and attentive Hostlers will always be on hand for this purpose.  We have lately purchased some fine Livery Stock, such as

Horses, Buggies, &c.,

which are for hire, upon the most reasonable terms.  Hacks, with careful drivers, furnished on the shortest notice.  Stable near the South-East corner of the Public Square, adjoining the "Tyler House."
v5n16 1y                                                                                  J. M. & A. C. Williams. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 4

J. G. Woldert,
Tyler, Texas,
Importer
And Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Dry Goods, Hosiery, Fancy Goods, Toys, Musical
Instruments, all kinds of Strings, Embroid-
eries, Trimmings, Artificial Flowers,
Jewelry, Cutlery, China
and Bohemian
Glass Ware.

Guns, Pistols, Pictures, Linens, Perfumeries, Combs, Brushes, Willow Ware, Wines, Cigars, and fine

Smoking Tobacco.

            Having the facilities, and being in connection with some of the first class Factories in Europe enables me to sell as low as in New York.                   v6n21-1y 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 4

Blacksmithing!
Blacksmithing!

            The subscribers have established a new Blacksmith Shop on the South-east corner of the Public Square, in the building formerly occupied by J. O. Ramsour, (adjoining W. L. Johnson's Carriage Shop,) where it is proposed to do all kinds of work in this line, in the best style and on the shortest notice.  Particularly do the subscribers propose to do

Carriage and Wagon Work,

in a manner unsurpassed for durability, and neatness, by any one in this section.
           
Tyler, Feb. 14 '61 [6-21-v                                                     Jones & Jack. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 4

The Best Thing Yet.
Furniture!

My Cabinet Shop (at Josephus Taylor's,) is situated seven and a half miles North of Tyler, where I make all kinds of

Furniture,

and sell it cheaper than anybody.  Don't throw away your money, but come and buy cheap Furniture from                                                                 M. Denson.
           
April 3, 1861.  v6n28.6m.

 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 4

Carolina House,

            The undersigned would respectfully inform the public that they have completed their new

Saloon,

bearing the above title, and have on hand the finest assortment of Liquors and Wines ever brought to this market.  Polite and attentive bar keepers on hand to attend to the wants of the thirsty.  All those disposed to indulge in a "smile" are invited to give us a call.
Tyler, April 25th.                                                                             J. W. Murphy 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 4

Attention!  The World!

            I have bought the entire interest of the "Company" of the firm of J. W. Murphy & Co.  All business hereafter, is to be conducted and transacted under my name.           
                                               
                                                            J. W. Murphy.
v6n22-tf                                                                                   Tyler, Feb. 12th, 1861 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 5

Louis Tondeur,
Watch Maker
And Jeweler,
Tyler, Smith County, Texas.

Is fully prepared to execute all work in his line in the best style, and upon the shortest notice.—Particular attention paid to repairing

Clocks, Watches, & Jewelry,

and all work fully guaranteed.  Extraordinary care given to work from a distance.
                                               
                                                Feb. 12. [6-21-6m. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 5

Saddle & Harness
Manufactory!

The undersigned having formed a partnership for the purpose of making to order, anything in the way of

Saddles, Bridles, Harness, &c., &c.,

take this method of informing their friends, and all who may give them a call, that they have recently purchased, in the city of New Orleans, a large and splendid assortment of material for carrying on their business.  All work will be done with neatness and dispatch, and as their motto is "good work and cheap prices," they flatter themselves that they will be able to give general satisfaction in everything, from the making of a fine Saddle to the mending of a Buggy Trace.

Mr. Hastings

has been employed in Kentucky, New Orleans and Texas, in some of the largest manufactories for a number of years, and all we ask is that you call and see for yourselves.  Terms Cash; or time to responsible customers, with interest to the end of the year.
                                               
                                                Kelly & Hastings.
           
6-33-3m.                                                                  Starrville, May 2nd, 1861. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 1, 1861, p. 4, c. 5

Groceries!!!
T. Albertsen & Bro.

Have just received, direct from New Orleans, a large and splendid assortment of

Family Groceries,

Wines, Brandies, Tobacco, Cigars, Sugar, Coffee, etc. etc., which they will sell cheaper for Cash, than any other house in Tyler.
           
All that we ask, is a call, being convinced that we can demonstrate to purchasers that they can obtain

Bargains

at our house.  We shall continue the Bakery establishment as heretofore. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter,
Is published every Thursday,
By W. F. Hamilton & Co.,
At $2,50 per Annum;
Six months                                            $1,50
Single Copy                                          10 cts. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Headquarters,

                                                                        Tyler, Texas, June 12, 1862.
General Order No. 5
           
I.  By virtue of a commission as Brigadier General in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States, the undersigned assumes command of all the troops within the State East of the Brazos River and North of the old San Antonio road.
           
II.  The Commanders of Regiments, Battalions and Companies within these limits, will report by express to these headquarters as early as possible, giving arm of service, strength of command, character, quantity and condition of arms, ammunition, camp and garrison equipage, hospital and medical stores, and transportation.
           
III.  I announce as a portion of my Staff, Major John Henry Brown, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l; Captain Ben. E. Benton, Aid de Camp; and Capts. A. W. Terrill, E. S. C. Robertson, C. L. Robards and W. A. Pitts, Volunteer Aids de Camp; who will be respected and obeyed as such.
           
IV.  All twelve months volunteers who have not re-organized under the furlough and bounty law, or the conscript act, will re-organize as early as practicable; and all officers not re-elected will be relieved from duty and their names reported to these headquarters.
           
V.  All enlisted men under 18 and over 35 years of age, who desire it, will be discharged from the service; and no person who is to be discharged under this order will take part in the re-organization.
           
VI.  All Regiments, Battalions and Companies North and East of this place (Tyler) including those of Col. Edward Clark, Col. W. B. Ochiltree, Col. Richard Waterhouse, and Col. Horace Randal, will take up the line of march, with as little delay as possible, for Little Rock, Arkansas, proceeding by the most practicable route from Marshall and Jefferson, and will report to the Commander of the Army West of the Mississippi River.
           
VII.  All official communication for these headquarters must be endorsed "Official Business" and directed to Major John Henry Brown, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l, C. S. P. A.
                                               
                        H. E. McCulloch,
                                               
                                    Brig. Gen'l C.S.P.A. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 1, c. 1-2

Headquarters,

                                                                                    Tyler, Texas, June 14, 1862.
General Order No. 6.
           
I.  It must be remembered that it is for liberty, freedom and individual rights that our country is involved in war, and that it is in defence of these that the citizens of the Confederate States are called to arms and have been, by law, constituted soldiers of the Government; and while every necessary step must be taken to secure the rights and interests of the troops, and the efficiency of the army, the rights and privileges of the citizens of the country, collectively and individually, must be respected and protected as far as possible.
           
II.  The person and private property of the citizen must be respected and protected by the officers of the army and the troops under them; and in no instance will private property be interfered with, unless the necessities of the public service require it.  If the emergency of the case requires any such interference, it must be done by order of the senior officer present.
           
III.  Private property used for public service must be paid for at the time if possible; and if there be no money to pay with, certified accounts must be given, to be paid as soon as funds can be obtained for that purpose.
           
IV.  Officers commanding troops in camps or on the march, will take the necessary steps to prevent the sale of intoxicating liquors to the troops under their commands, for any other than medicinal purposes; and when any citizen or person shall persist in selling to them, after being notified not to do so, his or their liquors will be destroyed.
           
V.  Officers commanding Regiments, Battalions, and Companies are responsible for the conduct of their troops, and will be held strictly accountable for the rigid enforcement of this order.  Any officer failing or refusing to comply with the provisions of the same will be suspended from his command.
           
VI.  Commanders of Regiments, Battalions and other corps, will furnish each Captain in their respective commands with a copy of this order, with instructions to have the same read to his Company.
           
VII.  Under instructions from the Commissary General of Subsistence, in future not exceeding one pound of fresh beef or half pound of bacon or pork, nor more than one and a half pounds of lour or corn meal will be issued to the ration.  commissaries are required to issue fresh beef five days out of seven, and bacon or pork for the remaining two days.
                                               
                        By order of
                                               
                                    Brig.  Gen. H. E. McCulloch. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Rev. Sam'l A. King preaches at the Methodist church in Tyler on the 4th Sabbath in every month, at 11 o'clock A.M., and 3 o'clock P.M. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
           
. . . In Texas, we are still whole—unharmed and confident—yea, even defiant!  All in all, we believe the skies are brightening; that the dawning morn bespeaks a glorious mid-day.  The people have only to hope on, struggle on, sacrifice on, and not many moons will wax and wane until peace, honorable peace, will break upon our land, filling every heart with joy and gladness, and tuning every voice to anthems of thankfulness. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 2, c. 3; p. 3, c. 1

                                                                                    Headquarters, Tyler, Texas,

                                                                                                June 9th, 1862.
General Order No. 7.
           
The following proclamation is published for the information of all persons, alien residents, citizens and soldiers, within that portion of Texas East of the Brazos and North of the old San Antonio and Nacogdoches Road.
           
Gen'l P O. Hebert, commanding the Department of Texas, having declared Martial Law over the entire State:
           
I, Henry E. McCulloch, Brig. Gen'l Confederate States Provisional Army, commanding the section of the State above referred to, do proclaim and define the operation of Martial Law therein as follows:
           
"Every white male person above the age of sixteen years, being temporarily or otherwise, within the aforesaid limits, shall, upon a summons issued by the Provost Marshal, promptly present himself before said Provost Marshal to have his name, residence and occupation registered, and to furnish such information as may be required of him; And such as claim to be aliens shall be sworn to the effect that they will abide by and maintain the laws of this State and the Confederate States, so long as they are permitted to reside therein, and that they will not convey to our enemies any information whatever, or do any act injurious to the Confederate States, or beneficial to the United States.
           
All orders issued by the Provost Marshals in the execution of their duties, shall be promptly obeyed.  Any disobedience of summons emanating from them shall be dealt with summarily.  All officers commanding troops will promptly comply with any requisitions made upon them by Provost Marshals for aid or assistance.
           
Any attempt to depreciate the currency of the Confederate States is an act of hostility; will be treated as such and visited with summary punishment.
           
Provost Marshals shall arrest and imprison disloyal persons, and persons whose conduct and presence is regarded injurious to the interest of the Government and people of the Confederate States, found within their respective districts, examine the case, and report the facts to the Commanding General, who will, upon such report, decide what the punishment shall be.
           
No person shall be permitted to sell intoxicating liquors to officers or soldiers in the Confederate States Army, except for medicinal purposes, upon the recommendation of a Surgeon or Assistant Surgeon of the army, or upon the written order from the officer commanding the nearest military post or camp.
           
The Collectors of the Confederate States War Tax, in the Counties of Robertson, Madison, Houston, Angelina, Nacogdoches, San Augustine, Sabine, Limestone, Navarro, Hill, Johnson, Tarrant, Denton, Cook and all the Counties within the limits of the State North and East of those Counties, are required to come forward at once, and pay over, at this place, (Tyler) the money that they have in their hands to the Quarter Master of my Brigade, or such other officer as I may designate to receive the same, for the use of the army.  Tax Collectors failing or refusing to comply promptly with this demand, will be regarded as unfriendly to the interest of the army, and will be summarily dealt with.—Military officers within this limit will see that this provision is carried into effect.
           
No interference with the rights of loyal citizens, or the usual routine of business, or the usual administration of the civil law, will be permitted, except when it may be necessary to secure the funds in the hands of public officers to be used for the support of the army or to enforce the provisions of this proclamation.
                                               
                                    Henry E. McCulloch.
                                               
                                                Brig. Gen'l, C.S.P.A.
Jno. Henry Brown, A. Adj't General. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 3, c. 2
                                               
                                                [Communicated]
Mr. Editor:--Permit me through your valuable paper to inform the ladies of this town and county, that since our troops have been ordered to this place, the old hotel opposite the "Tyler House" has been selected and appropriated for the Hospital.  I called around yesterday, and was pleased to find that out of some fifteen or twenty sick, only two or three were seriously ill.  Others were convalescent, while others had been brought in from camps that day.  On making inquiry concerning their wants, I was told by the physician that they needed everything, as the hospital had only been opened a few days.  Old clothes, waste paper, &c., would all be acceptable, and that he would, as well as the sick, be pleased to see the ladies often.  He hoped they would call as they did at Houston.  he eulogised the Houston ladies greatly for their kind and faithful attendance upon the hospital while they were there.  I remarked that it was only necessary for the ladies of Tyler to know where the hospital was located.
           
Ladies, we have our part to perform in this our country's struggle—let us be up and at work.
           
I would further remark that all the vegetables beyond home consumption, would be thankfully received and duly appreciated by the soldiers in camps.  Let us watch over our gardens and suffer nothing to be lost, and let it be little or much, send it down to Geo. Yarbrough's old store for further disposition.                                   M. C. K.
           
Tyler, June 18th

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 3, c. 3, also June 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

I Need
For Immediate Use
for the troops stationed at

this place (Tyler, Smith county) Soap, in bars; Salt, Candles and Vinegar.  Also Rye, Peas, and large quantities of Bacon, Meal, Sugar, Flour and Beef.  I will make large contracts for the above articles, and will also buy in small quantities, as they are much needed.
                                               
                                                J. B. Sydnor,
                                               
                        Captain & A. C. S. of C. S. A.
Tyler, June 16th, 1862.  [7-29] 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 3, c. 3; also June 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Notice!

            Estrayed from the subscriber, 7˝  miles North-west of Tyler, the following described stock, to-wit:  One bay Filly, two years old, has a small white spot in her face, one or both hind feet white.  One bay Horse Colt, two years old.  One dark bay or black Horse Colt, one year old.
           
These horses left my place about the 1st of April last.  Any information concerning any or all of them will be thankfully received.
                                               
                                    June 9th, 1862.
7-28-3w                                                                                  Sam'l A. Smith. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 2, also June 26, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

Smith County Estrays.

            Taken up by Wm. Capps, and estrayed before Louis Sparkman, J. P. in Precinct No. 10, one sorrel mule, about 14 hands high, about 10 years old, and appraised at $60.  March 29th, 1862.
           
Taken up by Jas. M. Glenn, and estrayed before Louis Sparkman, J. P. in Precinct No. 10, one bay mare, 4 years old, about 14 hands high, and appraised at $65.  May 28, 1862.
           
Taken up by J. C. Allen, and estrayed before Louis Sparkman, J. P. in Precinct No. 10, one light bay Indian pony, left hind foot white, branded J. S. on the left shoulder, 13 hands high, 4 years old, and appraised at $40.  April 18, 1862.
           
Taken up by Henry Wilfong, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. in Precinct No. 1, one dark chestnut sorrel mare, with a white spot in her face, 8 or 9 years old, about 15 hands high; no marks or brands, and appraised at $100.  Also, a mule colt, horse, dark brown color, about 8 months old; no marks or brands, and appraised at $25.  April 12th, 1862.  [7-27.0                 R. W. Chapman, Clk. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

J. H. Warren, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler Texas.

Offers his professional services to the public.
Office East side of the public. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Davenport & Goodman,
Physicians & Surgeons,
Tyler, Texas.

Will promptly answer to all calls in the line of their profession.  They have formed a partnership for the practice of Medicine and Surgery, and will be found at all time, (unless professionally absent,) at the Drug Store of Davenport & Co., in the brick building on the North-West corner of the Public Square.  The attention of both will be given in all cases when necessary, without additional charge.
                                               
                                                Jo. W. Davenport, M. D.
                                               
                                                Wm. J. Goodman, M. D. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

M. A. Long                                          R. B. Hubbard
Long & Hubbard,
Attorneys at Law,
Tyler, Texas

Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial District, and in the U. S. and Federal Courts at Tyler.                                                                                    [v5n41-1y] 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business intrusted [sic] to his care.
           
Tyler, Smith county, Texas, June 17, 1856.
           
v1n46-tf. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Stephen Reaves,
Attorney at Law.

Will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Courts, of the Western District of Texas.
           
Office, at Tyler.
sept 6, 1854.                                                                                                    v1n1-tf 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

"Tyler House."
Tyler, Smith Co. Texas.
J. M. Williams, Proprietor

Having taken the above named house which has just been vacated by its former well known lessee, (Rev. A. G. Irvine,) I respectfully solicit a call from its old patrons and friends, and the public generally.  Extensive repairs and additions will be immediately made to the Hotel buildings, and comfortable quarters insured to all who may stop with me.  Attached to the Hotel is a large Livery Stable, where horses will be well attended top and at all times travellers can be forwarded to any point, on the shortest notice.
           
Tyler, Dec'r 12, 1860.  1y. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Carolina House.

            The undersigned would respectfully inform the public that they have completed their new

Saloon,

bearing the above title, and have on hand the finest assortment of Liquors and Wines ever brought to this market.  Polite and attentive bar keepers on hand to attend to the wants of the thirsty.  All those disposed to indulge in a "smile" are invited to give us a call.
Tyler, April 25th.                                                                             J. W. Murphy. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 19, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Saw-Mill.

            The undersigned has removed his Steam Saw-Mill to his new pinery, 8 miles South of Tyler, on the Larrissa road, where, in a few days he will be ready to fill all orders on shortest notice, at the following rates, which are CASH, only.

Prices of Lumber.

Square Lumber per 100                                                                        $1.25
"           "            "            over 20 feet                                                      1.50
Ripped "            "                                                                                    1.50
v5n26 1y                                                                                  J. N. McKinley. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

                                                                        Headquarters, Tyler, Texas,  }
                                               
                        June 19th, 1862.                   }
General Order No. 8.
           
1.  To correct misconstructions of General Order No. 5, from these headquarters and the provisions of the Conscript Act, the following order is published for the information of officers and men under my command:
           
II.  All persons who voluntarily entered the army of the Confederate States for three years or during the war, whether under 18 or over 35 years of age, will be held to their contract for that length of time, unless they are discharged under some special order to be given hereafter.
           
III.  All enlisted men, who volunteered for less than three years or the war, that were in the army of the Confederate States on the 16th day of April, 1862, over 18 and under 35 years of age, are held for the service, under the provisions of the Conscript Act for three years or during the war, and will be so held until otherwise directed by the Secretary of War.
                                               
                        By order of
                                               
                        Brig. Gen. Henry E. McCulloch.
Jno. Henry Brown, A. Ad'jt. General. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

                                                                        Headquarters, Tyler, Texas,  }
                                               
                        June 21, 1862.                     }
General Order No. 9.
           
I.  The reputation, strength and efficacy of an army depends greatly upon the discipline of its troops.  consequently the Articles of War and the rules and regulations of the army must be enforced.  In order to accomplish this the more easily, it is made the special duty of Commanders of Companies to cause the Articles of War to be read to their Companies at least once in each month.
           
II.  Commanders of Regiments, Battalions and Independent Companies will cause their respective commands to be mustered on the last day of this month (June, 1862,) and hereafter on the last day of every succeeding two months, in accordance with the regulations of the army.
           
III.  Commanders as above will make Monthly Reports, Post and Field Returns promptly at the time they are due.
           
IV.  The troops are needed in camp, and they will not be permitted to ramble through the country, or visit towns or villages without permission from their Commanding Officers, who are directed to restrict this privilege to cases of necessity or business.
           
V.  The condition of the country demands the suspension of all leaves of absence and furloughs under the "furlough, bounty and conscript laws" for the present.  Hence no leave of absence or furlough will be granted by Commanders of Brigades, Legions, Regiments, Battalions or Independent Companies for a longer time than five days.  All leaves of absence and furloughs for more than five days must be submitted to the Commanding General for his approval, and none will be approved except in cases of great emergency.
                                               
                        By order of
                                               
                        Brig. Gen'l. Henry E. McCulloch.
Jno. Henry Brown, A. Adj't. General. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
           
We had a light rain here last week and understand that heavier rains fell in the surrounding country.  Corn generally is doing very well, and some farmers tell us they will make good crops without more rain. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
           
At the re-organization of Col. Hubbard's Regiment, on the 17th inst., the following officers were elected:
           
Richard B. Hubbard, Colonel, without opposition.
           
E. E. Lott, Lt. Colonel.
           
J. J. Cannon, Major.
           
Staff—F. N. Gary, Quartermaster; Wm. Masterson, Adj't; A. L. Patton, Surgeon; Wm. M. Hamilton, 1st Ass't Surgeon; J. W. Waites, Serg't Major.
           
The company and other staff appointments will be made in a few days.  The Regiment will be a full one, and is a fine body of soldiery.  They are at "Camp Hubbard," four miles North-east of Tyler, at the sulphur springs. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
                                               
                        Headquarters, Tyler, Texas.  }
                                               
                        June 24th, 1862.                   }
Special Order No. 41.
           
I.  Col. J. J. Diamond has been sent to Texas by Maj. Gen. Hindman to assemble and organize the troops that have been sent home from the different dismounted Regiments with horses, wagons, &c., and for that purpose Col. Diamond calls upon them to repair immediately to Clarksville, Texas.  No time should be lost in responding to this call; and the troops are directed to march singly, by squads, detachments, or otherwise, to that place and report to Col. Diamond, with as little delay as possible.
           
II.  Those who have wagons in charge will take as many with them as may be necessary to transport their supplies, and turn the remainder over to a Quartermaster for the transportation of other troops to Little Rock.
           
By order of
                                               
                        Brig. Gen. Henry E. McCuloch [sic]
           
Jno. Henry Brown, A. Adjutant General. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
           
We understand that Gen. McCulloch has appointed, or is appointing, Provost marshals in the counties composing this Military District.  As yet we know nothing of the appointments, except that Capt. John C. Robertson, of this place, has been appointed Provost Marshal in Chief of the District. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 3
                                               
                                    Headquarters, Tyler, Texas,  }
                                               
                                    June 24th, 1862.                   }
Editor Tyler Reporter—
           
Sir:--I desire to say to the people through your paper, that guns are needed by the troops now in the service.
           
There is a regular Government Agent (Col. John D. Stell) at this place, who will buy double barrel shot guns, muskets and rifles of all kinds, if with reasonably large bores.
           
The guns must be in good shooting order.
           
Col. Stell has the cash to pay for these guns at a fair price, and I earnestly hope the citizens of the country will send in every gun they can possibly spare that may be fit for immediate service.
           
Maj. Gen. Hindman urges me to bring all the arms I can get with the troops that go to Arkansas.—They will be needed, and no man ought to withhold a gun that he can spare.
                                               
                                    Most Respectfully, &c.,
                                               
                                    Henry E. McCulloch,
                                               
                                                Brig. Gen. C.S.P.S. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
           
We are informed by the mayor that the people of the interior have nobly responded to the appeal for aid to the fugative [sic] citizens of Galveston, and that he can now send quite a number of families to comfortable homes during the war, if they will apply to him.  A good many have been sent out already, and yet there is room for more.—Houston Telegraph. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
           
Weather clear, hot and dry—health good, both among soldiers and citizens. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
           
Disastrous Fire.—About 2 o'clock last Wednesday night the extensive Foundry of Alexander McCowan, Esq., was discovered to be on fire.  The alarm was first given by the watchman at the depot near by.  In few moments the whole building was enveloped in flames.  The fire companies were soon on the ground but their exertions were of no avail except in protecting surrounding property.  The safe and its contents were saved, but all else was destroyed.  Even the books were lost they being in a desk.  We question whether the destruction of any other building in this city would prove so disastrous to the community at large as the loss of this one.  It was fill[ed] with costly machinery such as planers lathes and valuable tools.  The patterns lost had been accumulating for the last fifteen years and cost no less than 25,000.  Their loss will be seriously felt, for they belonged to the machinery which is scattered all over the country.  The entire loss is not less than $40,000.  No insurance.  The fire originated in the second story, in the pattern room, and was no doubt the work of an incendiary.  The enterprising proprietor is already cleaning away the rubbish preparatory to the erection of another building.  No obstacle will be thrown in his way, for his is universally esteemed, and he has the sympathies of the entire community in his great loss, and its best wishes for his future success.—Houston Telegraph. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
           
The re-organization of Col. O. M. Robert's regiment took place last Monday, but we have no announcement of the result.  We learn, however, Col. Roberts was re-elected without opposition.—James Jones, Lt. Colonel, and ______Carroway, Major. 

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Obituary.

            Wm. Baker, of Van Zandt county, died near Fayetteville, Ark., of Pneumonia fever, on the 7th of march, 1862, in his 23d year.
           
Thus has been given up on the altar of liberty the precious life of a noble youth and brave soldier while marching to the battle field of Elkhorn to defend the liberties and rights of his beloved country.
           
Willie was the favorite of the family, and for his amiable disposition and virtues was esteemed and well beloved by friends as well as relatives.  In society for his morals, he was a moddle [sic], and never fell victim to those follies and vices so common to the soldier.  The deceased was not a member of the visible church, yet in his strictly moral course through life, and in his death, which was as calm and sweet as an infant, we find hope, and confidently believe his sweet spirit is numbered with the redeemed of Christ in a blissful eternity.                                                             Charlie.            

TYLER REPORTER, June 26, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

                                                            Camp Hubbard, Smith County, Texas,            }
                                               
                                    June 17, 1862.                       }
           
Whereas, at a meeting of the officers and members of Capt. A. Fitzgerald's Company, of Hubbard's Regiment Texas Volunteers, this day held at the above named place, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted, to-wit:
           
Whereas, our gallant and esteemed Captain has tendered his resignation as such, and declined becoming a candidate at the re-organization, in consequence of the illness of his family, therefore be it
           
Resolved, That we accept his resignation, and regret deeply the circumstances that require his retirement from the service, and under other circumstances would unanimously insist upon his remaining with us and retaining his position as Captain.
           
Resolved, That we hereby tender to Capt. Fitzgerald, our undivided thanks for the faithful, impartial and efficient manner in which, at all times, he has discharged his duties as commander of the company, and that we sincerely sympathise with him and his afflicted family.
           
Resolved, That our commissioned and non-commissioned officers sign these resolutions on behalf of the company.
                                               
                                                B. S. Watts, Presd't.
           
A. P. Shuford, Sect'y.
           
A. S. Watts, 1st Lieut; A. D. Renshaw, 2d. Lieut.; D. D. Shuford, 2d Jun. Lieut.; George J. Ball, Orderly Seg't.' J. J. Knight, 2d Serg't; B. P. Stout, 3d Serg't; R. P. Reed, 4th Serg't; F. M. Rush, 5th Serg't. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter,
Is published every Thursday,
By W. F. Hamilton & co.,
At $2,50 per Annum;

Six Months                                           $1,50.
Single Copy                                          10 cts. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Headquarters,
Trans-Miss. Dist.

                                                                                    Little Rock, Ark., July 10th, 1862.
Special Order No. 26.
           
The extreme scarcity of forage renders it an impossibility to maintain a large mounted force, without causing distress, if not actual starvation, among the troops and poorer people of the country; therefore all commanders of companies and regiments of mounted men, now en route to these Headquarters from Southern Arkansas and Texas, upon seeing this order, are required to dismount their men before proceeding farther, and send the horses with suitable details home, and move forward as infantry.
           
This order applies to those commands which have been heretofore formally accepted, as well as to others.
           
The imperative necessity of the case admits of no exception whatever, and it is hoped that a proper degree of patriotism will ensure a ready obedience.
                                               
                        By order of Maj.-Gen. Hindman,
                                               
                                    R. C. Newton, Chief of Staff.
Official,
           
J. P. Wilson, A. Adjutant General. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

Headquarters,

                                                                                                Tyler, Texas, July 19, 1862.
Special Order No. [blank]
           
The above special order No. 26, issued by Major Gen. T. C. Hindman, commanding the Trans-Mississippi District, has been received at these Headquarters, and is re-published by order of Brig.-Gen. Henry E. McCulloch, for the information and government of all mounted troops in Texas en route or destined for service in Arkansas.
           
Gen. McCulloch, realising the imperious necessity which compels the dismounting of our troops, calls upon them, as Texians, to yield cheerful obedience to the necessities of our struggling country, as ordered by Maj.-Gen. Hindman.  Cavalry cannot be supported in Arkansas.  Upon infantry, the chief reliance of all armies, the country mostly depends.  Mounted commands may retain their horses till they reach Red River, and then send them home as ordered by Gen. Hindman.
                                               
            By order of
                                               
            Brig. Gen'l Henry E. McCulloch.
Jno. Henry Brown,
           
Major and A. Adj't. General. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 1, c. 1
           
Three companies of Col. W. P. Lane's Partisan Rangers, under the command of Major Burns, left on Tuesday for Little Rock.—Tex. Rep. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
J. P. Douglas                }
H. V. Hamilton             } Editors. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Rev. Sam'l A. King preaches at the Methodist church in Tyler on the 4th Sabbath in every month, at 11 o'clock A.M., and 3 o'clock P.M. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
           
Over the signature of "C," we publish a communication relating to the recent action of the Chief Provost Marshal in restricting the price of leather.  C.'s remarks are correct and true, and in the proper spirit, and we endorse them fully.  But the Provost Marshal knows, and the people should so consider, that it is not at all times an easy matter to determine precisely at what point extortion commences as to any given article, and that sometimes merchants and traders may seem to extort, when if the circumstances were known, the appearances would be changed.  We are no apologist for extortioners or any other class of enemies to this Confederacy, but on the contrary, despise them with bitterness; but let justice be done to all.  Now if we take an instance the cotton cards which are being sold here at $15,00 a pair, and enquire as to whether a case of extortion is here, we must first ascertain the circumstances—find out what the cards cost the merchant who has them for sale, what was his trouble, expense, &c.—for it is not reasonable to expect a man to sell a thing for less than it cost him, and the rules of trade allow a reasonable profit.  This is true of all classes of trade and sales.  The duty of Provost Marshals is to look into these matters and regulate them.  As to the cards, the main question is and has been, where did they come from? 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

An Appeal to the Ladies of Tyler and Vicinity.

            So far, in the progress of the present war, the ladies in and around Tyler have performed their part nobly, with unremitting and self-sacrificing devotion to our beloved country.  By a glance at the complementary notices of the patriotic industry of the ladies in adjoining counties, it will be seen that the handiwork (and the hands work as the heart prompts,) of the women of Smith county exceeds by quadruple the amount accomplished by those of perhaps any other county in the State.  We shall soon have finished hundreds of tents, and thousands of knapsacks, haversacks, &c., besides large quantities of clothing and hospital stores.
           
Circumstances have placed it in our power, and made it our duty and pleasure to do thus much.  But, ladies, we have now before us a more fearful responsibility, an imperative duty, a duty which must not be neglected, if we love our country, if we have a hope of heaven!  Are we, as wives, mothers, daughters and sisters, doing our whole duty to the sick now lying in our hospitals?  Do we when we pray to Almighty God for mercy on our bleeding country—do we ever forget to ask, if the hard hand of disease is laid on our husbands, fathers, sons and brothers in a land of strangers, that His hand will raise up friends for them there?—that He will send around the couch of languishing disease true-hearted WOMEN, to render such service as is only in the knowledge of the hand of woman?  Ladies, those of you who have not visited the hospital, go for a few moments.  See yon fair-haired boy, all pale and emaciated as he is—approach him—place your hand tenderly on his brow—ask him if he feels better, and if he will take some nourishment?  See his sunken eye fill with tears as he replies quickly, "If you please, madam, if you have anything which is not prepared here in the hospital."  Listen now to the poor soldier on the next bed.  He is dying.  He sees you, and thinks of his mother, and asks you in piteous accents to pray that he may see his mother once again.
           
Ladies, this is no fancy sketch; it is a true picture of the constantly recuring [sic] scenes of a sad reality.  Let us pray that the great God of our country will enable us to do our duty to those dear soldiers stricken with disease in our town.  Then with His assistance, we shall succeed, and He will provide, too, for those of our own kindred who are suffering in a distant land.
           
For the more effectual accomplishment of our duties in a strict and constant attention to the hospitals, it is necessary that we should have some organized plan of proceeding.  It is, therefore, suggested that those ladies who wish to assist in this good work, will meet at the Christian Church on Saturday, 26th inst., 3 o'clock P.M.
                                               
                                                            S. G. R. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

Notice to Detached Soldiers!!
Headquarters,

                                                                                    Tyler, Texas, July 20, 1862.
           
The detached men belonging to the dismounted regiments formerly commanded by Cols. Greer, Stone, Locke, Young, Sims, Whitfield, Camp (late Col. M. T. Johnson's) and Crump's battalion, who were sent home with the horses of their commands, are notified and required forthwith to assemble at Paris, Lamar County, Texas.  At Paris they will report to Major Wm. E. Estes, of Col. Andrews, (late Crumps) regiment, who has been assigned to the temporary command of said detached men in lieu of Col. J. J. Diamond.  Most of these men have already reported at Paris.  All others, who have not been discharged by competent authority, must do so without delay, or they will be treated as deserters.  On reporting to Major Estes, he will discharge those who desire it, who were over 35 or under 18 years of age on the 16th day of April, 1862.
                                               
                                    By order of
                                               
                                    Gen. Henry E. McCulloch.
Jno. Henry Brown, Major and A. Adj't Gen. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 3, c. 1

Headquarters,
Trans-Miss. Dist.

                                                                                    Little Rock, Ark., July 17th, 1862.
General Order No. 26.
           
I.  The organization of Partisan Rangers in this District under any authority whatever, is prohibited and those now organized are hereby declared to be mounted infantry—and subject to be dismounted whenever it is deemed expedient.  This order does not relate to independent companies formed under General Order No. 17.
           
II.  Persons heretofore authorized to raise Battalions, and Regiments in the State of Missouri, must complete the organization of the same and report within thirty (30) days from this date or their authority will be considered as annulled.
                                               
                        By order of Maj.-Gen. Hindman.
                                               
                                    R. C. Newton, Chief of Staff.
Official.           
           
J. P. Wilson, A. Adjutant General. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 2, c. 1-2

Headquarters,

                                                                                    Tyler, Texas, July 23, 1862.
General Order No. 164
           
I.  The foregoing order No. 20, from Major Gen. T. C. Hindman, is published for the information of all concerned.
           
II.  Having been directed to assemble and organize the Texas troops who are to serve in the District which Gen. Hindman commands, it is necessary that I adapt my course to his views, which is the more agreeable to me, as I fully endorse them.
           
III.  There are many persons, I learn, engaged in raising mounted men in Texas.  This is a great interference with the proper enforcement of the Conscript law; and, under the circumstances, detrimental to the interest of the service.  Hence I shall not recognise or accept the service of any troops, unless, they have been raised by order of the Secretary of War, Gen. Van Dorn, Gen. Hindman, Gen Hebert, or myself; and, as the troops that go to Arkansas must be accepted by Gen. Hindman or myself, I respectfully advise Texians not to enlist under any one whose authority does not emenate [sic] as above indicated.  I might add further, that property bought on credit by persons who do not hold authority as above, may not be paid for by the Confederate States.
           
IV.  It is advisable to suspend the raising of mounted men in Texas for service in Arkansas.  Hence no more mounted men will be accepted by me, no matter by what authority raised, after the first day of next month; and all who are now in service and who enter it by that time, may expect to be dismounted at Red River.
           
V.  Gen. Hindman informs me that some of the Rangers have deserted our cause in Arkansas.—These must be men from other states North of us, who have straggled into Texas and entered the service for plunder or pay.  It cannot be that our people would be guilty of an act so base and so totally incompitable [sic] with their history and honor.—But it is immaterial where they are from, and what the pretended cause of their course, the must and will be arrested and punished.  All military officers and Provost Marshals, are directed to arrest any and all deserters that may come within their reach, and send them to Little Rock by any military force going to that place or to these Head-Quarters.
                       
                        By order of
                       
                        Brig. Gen'l. Henry E. McCulloch,
Jno. Henry Brown,
                       
Major and A. Adj't. Gen. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 3, c. 2

[Communicated.]

Editor Reporter:
           
In your last issue I notice an order from the District Provost Marshal, in which he restricts the price of leather to forty cents.  This is as it should be; but why make this distinction alone as to leather?  There are other articles equally important to the people.  Extortionate prices are being made by the merchants.  For instance, cotton cards are being sold by a merchant at this place at fifteen dollars per pair!  Shoes and other articles that families are compelled to have, are equally high priced.  It is to be hoped that the Provost Marshal will look into this matter, and amend his order by adding other articles of prime necessity, and restricting the prices of the same.  I hope you will give this a place in your valuable journal.  Let us have quality and justice in all things.
                                               
                                    Yours, &c.                  C. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
                                               
                                    Tyler, July 23d 1862.
           
Capt. Ben. E. Benton, will attend to the business of the Ordnance office during my absence.
                                               
            John D. Still [?], As't Ord. Ag't C.S.A. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Hospital Stores.

            The following communication explains itself.  We trust it will be read with care by every one, and that a hearty response will be made.  We call especially upon the "Aid Societies" of the county to come up manfully to the work they are called upon to do.  In this way a brave people must and can purchase liberty—and liberty is cheap at any price, no matter what the sacrifice of money, of goods, of personal ease and comfort:
                                               
                                    Henderson, Texas, July 17th, 1862.
Editor Tyler Reporter—
           
Sir:--You will see through the Jefferson and Marshall papers that I have been detailed by the War Department of the Trans-Mississippi District as Special Agent to Eastern Texas, for the purpose of getting up Hospital Supplies for the army.  It being impossible for me to visit Tyler sufficiently early to put the thing on foot in time, I wish you would arouse the people to a proper appreciation of this call in your county, and through your paper the adjacent counties.
           
There will be a large army soon at Little Rock.  Sickness is rife among them, and from the fact of being cut off from all resources of getting such things as hospital clothing, &c., it has been thought necessary that an agent be sent to Texas as the most suitable place to procure them.  Have the Aid Societies to meet; have them to appoint committees for the purpose of inciting each neighborhood to a proper appreciation of the necessities of the army; have them to send their goods to the County Site, and from thence to Jefferson.  We want old sheets, bed sacks or ticks, pillow cases, shirts, if to be had; bandages 1 1-2 to 2 1-2 inches wide; old linen, &c.  I have been highly flattered wherever I have been, that this call will be responded to with alacrity, and from the interest manifested at Jefferson, Marshal and Henderson, by the gentlemen as well as ladies, I feel confident that the Department will not be disappointed in its expectations.  I shall go from here to Nacogdoches, San Augustine, Rusk, and Cherokee counties, and to your section as soon as I can get there.
           
With implicit confidence in the press and the patriotism of the Southern people,
           
I am, sir, most respectfully &c.,
                                               
                                                            R. L. Smith. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 1
           
Capt. A. U. Wright, Quartermaster in Taylor's (formerly Moore's Regiment,[)], requests us to state that he will be compelled to leave Texas for the army on the 1st of August.  He is in Gilmer with funds to pay off the indebtedness of the regiment, and he earnestly urges all persons interested to call on him, or send their claims, without delay for payment.—Texas Republican.
           
Capt. Wright could have greatly accommodated many creditors if, instead of stopping at Gilmer, and inviting hundreds of men to ride there, he had gone where the principal debts were contracted. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

Robbery!—Fire!

            The residence of Mrs. Martha Rooks, about eight miles South of Tyler, on the waters of Mud Creek, was burned on the 4th day of this month.  At that time the undersigned lost the following notes, which he believes were stolen from the house previous to the fire:  Four notes drawn by Henry R. Cockrel, and made payable to me—one for $200,00; one for $161,00; one for $75,00, and one for $6,00.  Also one note on Henry Kent, for $100,00, with a credit of $40,00.  The public will watch for these notes, and inform on any one in whose possession they may be found, and thereby detect a very dangerous thief.                                                            Thos. Driver.
           
July 7th, '62.                  7-32-3t. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by Richard Yarbrough, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. in Precinct No. 1, Smith county, one bay horse, black mane and tail, somewhat disfigured, has a scar on his left thigh, near the hip bone, about three years old past, branded S. T. N. on his left shoulder; appraised at seventy-five dollars. July 8th, 1862.
                                               
                                                R. W. Chapman, Clerk. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration having been granted to the undersigned on the estate of John Rasbury, dec'd, on the 30th day of June, 1862, by the County Court of Smith county, this is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted to said estate will please make payment.                                                          Tyler, June 30th, 1862.
           
7-31-6t.                                                                    Mc. D. Lorance, Adm'r. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

Executors Notice.

            Letters Testamentary, with the will annexed, having been granted to the undersigned on the estate of W. T. Thornton, dec'd, by the Probate Court of Smith county, on the 30th day of June, 1862—this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted to said estate will please make payment.
                                               
                                    Robert Lyon, Executor.
7-31-6t.                                                                                   June 30th, 1862. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

I Need
For Immediate Use
for the troops stationed at

this place (Tyler, Smith county) Soap, in bars; Salt, Candles and Vinegar.  Also Rye, Peas, and large quantities of Bacon, Meal, Sugar, Flour and Beef.  I will make large contracts for the above articles, and will also buy in small quantities, as they are much needed.
                                               
                                                J. B. Sydnor,
                                               
                                    Captain & A. C. S. of C. S. A.
           
Tyler, June 16th, 1862.               [7-29] 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

J. H. Warren, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler Texas.

Offers his professional services to the public.
Office East side of the public. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Davenport & Goodman,
Physicians & Surgeons,
Tyler, Texas,

Will promptly answer to all calls in the line of their profession.  They have formed a partnership for the practice of Medicine and Surgery, and will be found at all time, (unless professionally absent,) at the  Drug Store of Davenport & Co., in the brick building on the North-West corner of the Public Square.  The attention of both will be given in all cases when necessary, without additional charge.
                       
                                                                        Jo. W. Davenport, M. D.
                                               
                                                Wm. J. Goodman, M. D. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

M. A. Long.                                         R. B. Hubbard.
Long & Hubbard,
Attorneys at Law,
Tyler, Texas.

Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial District, and in the U. S. and Federal Courts at Tyler.                                                                                    [v5n41-1y] 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
Tyler, Smith county, Texas, June 17, 1856.
v1n45-tf 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Stephen Reaves,
Attorney at Law.

Will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Courts, of the Western District of Texas.
           
Office, at Tyler.
           
sept. 6, 1854.                                                                           v1n1-tf 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

"Tyler House."
Tyler, Smith Co. Texas.
J. M. Williams, Proprietor.

            Having taken the above named house which has just been vacated by its former well known lessee. (Rev. A. G. Irvine,) I respectfully solicit6 a call from its old patrons and friends, and the public generally.  Extensive repairs and additions will be immediately made to the Hotel buildings, and comfortable quarters insured to all who may stop with me.  Attached to the Hotel is a large Livery Stable, where horses will be well attended to; and at all times travellers can be forwarded to any point, on the shortest notice.
           
Tyler, Dec'r 12, 1860. 1y 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Carolina House.

            The undersigned would respectfully inform the public that they have completed their new

Saloon,

bearing the above title, and have on hand the finest assortment of Liquors and Wines ever brought to this market.  Polite and attentive bar keepers on hand to attend to the wants of the thirsty.  All those disposed to indulge in a "smile" are invited to give us a call.
Tyler, April 25th.                                                                             J. W. Murphy. 

TYLER REPORTER, July 24, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Saw-Mill.

            The undersigned has removed his Steam Saw-Mill to his new pinery, 8 miles South of Tyler, on the Larrissa road, where, in a few days he will be ready to fill all orders on shortest notice, at the following rates, which are CASH, only.

Prices of Lumber.

Square Lumber per 100                                                $1.25
"           "            "            over 20 feet                             1.50
Ripped "            "                                                           1.50
v5n26 1y                                                                                              J. N. McKinley. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter,
Is published every Thursday,
By W. F. Hamilton & Co.,


At $2,50 per Annum;
Six months                                                        $1,50
Single copy                                                       10 cts. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
J. P. Douglas,               }Editors
H. V. Hamilton,           

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Any person having a hack and pair of horses to hire, can get a good price for them for several days, by calling at this office.  We guarantee that good care will be taken of them if hired. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Our fellow-citizen, John Winship, has lost a splendid horse, and offers a reward for his recovery.  Any one lending assistance in this matter will accomplish three very laudable objects, viz:  get the reward, accommodate a clever gentleman, and aid a good soldier. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Messrs. Short, Biscoe, & Co., advertise for Gunsmiths.  They want 30 or 40 good workmen.—See advertisement.  We will mention here that these gentlemen are preparing to manufacture firearms extensively, and will soon have in operation at this place a large establishment for that purpose.  We understand that they have just closed a contract for 5,000 guns for this State. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
We give up much of our available space today to the publication of, perhaps, the blackest list ever published in this State—the names of those persons, claiming to be Texians, who have recently deserted from the 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th Texas regiments, now in Arkansas.  When the report of these desertions first reached us, we earnestly hoped there was some mistake; we can now only hope that these men are not real Texians, but those who have come among us for evil motives or to shun responsibilities in their own States.  This is, we believe, the first stain upon the reputation of Texas;--God grant that it may be the last! 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Yesterday a week ago, we attended, by special invitation, a barbecue given to Col. Speight's Regiment by the citizens in the vicinity of their encampment, twelve or fourteen miles North-west of this place.  We arrived on the ground about 9 o'clock in the morning, and found the troops already on parade.  The regiment was reviewed by Gen. McCulloch, who pronounced the troops well drilled.  Gen. McCulloch addressed the regiment in a stirring appeal, the good effects of which were visible.  Dinner time arrived, and with it a bountiful supply of such substantials as are customary on such occasions.  A dinner at a private house could not have passed off more agreeably.  After dinner, the troops and citizens were again assembled, and Col. Speight in a chaste and neat address, returned the thanks of his command to the citizens for the honor done them.  Major John Henry Brown, of Gen. McCulloch's Staff, being then loudly called, indulged in a short, pointed address—full of humor, good sense and excellent advice.  Lt. Col. Harrison, being called, also indulged in a few pertinent remarks.  The whole affair passed off well, and we believe all present enjoyed themselves, notwithstanding the intense heat of the day.  Speight's regiment enjoys an excellent reputation for good behavior and the exhibition of all those characteristics which to go make the good soldier. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 3, c. 2-3

Reward for Deserters!

                                                                                    Headquarters, Tyler, Texas,  }
                                               
                                                August 19, 1862.      }
           
Major Gen. T. C. Hindman, commanding the Trans-Mississippi District, having transmitted to Brig. Gen. Henry E. McCulloch, at these Headquarters, a full list of the deserters from the 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th Texas Regiments, now in Arkansas, the same is herewith published for information, and that the names of the recreants and cowardly apostates may become known and receive the scorn and execration of the people they have betrayed.  The official list is as follows:
[note:  none from Smith County—following are selected for particular reasons]
15th Texas Reg't—Col. Sweet Commanding.
Comp. B.  George Mills, Decatur, Wise County, Tex.
"           "  Henry McKinney, "            "        "          "
"           "  Moses B. Hopkins,        Hunt      "          "
"           "  Wm. J. Carver,              Wise     "          "
"           E.  John W. Davis, Tarrant            "          "
"           H.  Thos. J. Williams,       Hunt       "          "
17th Texas Reg't—Lt.  Col. Hendricks, Com'dg.
Comp. A.  B Candiff, Nacogdoches, Nac. Co. Tex
           
      J B Hardeman, "                 "            "
           
A reward of thirty ($30) dollars will be paid for the arrest and delivery of any one of these deserters to the commanding officer at Little Rock, Ark., or to the commander of any force on the march for that place.  Any Quarter Master of such force, having the funds, will pay said reward.
           
Brig. Gen. McCulloch is satisfied that this first disgrace brought upon the name of  Texas, is almost exclusively perpetrated by renegades from other States who entered Texas last fall and winter to avoid the struggle in Missouri and Arkansas, and joined these regiments in Texas only to escape an indignant public opinion.  They should never be allowed to pollute our soil again.  A few of the names of these miscreants are recognised as those suspected of abolition and toryism anterior to the secession of the State.
           
By Order of Brig. Gen. Henry E. McCulloch.
                                               
                                                Jno. Henry Brown,
                                               
                                                            Major & A. Adj't Gen.
           
[Papers in Texas friendly to our cause, will please copy the above.] 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
           
Died—On Monday, the 11th of August, inst., Thomas Green, only son of Jas. F. and Sallie J. Warren—aged one year and eight months.
           
While unrelenting death has been busy in the ranks of the young and middle aged, striking down man in the pride of his manhood, Azrial has flapped his dusky wing above the couch of infancy, and carried the spirit of an innocent child to be placed in the arms of its eternal Father.  As the immortal parted from its clay, and sped its flight to that bright world where angels dwell, hosannahs pealed forth from the heavenly choir, that another bright spirit in its infant purity had swelled the numbers of the blest.
                                               
                                                            S. M. W. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
           
Wanted to Hire!—A good, faithful negro woman, to do house work for a small family—a good washer and ironer.  Apply at Reporter Office for information. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Committed

            To the jail of Smith county, Texas, on the 5th day of August, 1862, a certain negro man, of the following description to-wit:  About 26 years old, of dark complexion, about 5 feet 10 inches high, weighs about 175 pounds, has a small moustache, full eyes, tolerably quick spoken, and says his name is Jackson, sometimes called Jack, and that he belongs to Robert Gaston, who lives two and a half miles from Rake Pocket, in Rusk county, Texas.  The owner of said slave is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be dealt with according to law.
[7-39]                                                              Benj. Scott, Sh'ff S. C. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

$50,00 Reward!

            Strayed or stolen, from the stable of the undersigned, near the town of Tyler, Smith county, on Sunday night, the 17th inst., a fine young sorrel horse, four years old last spring, about fifteen hands high, both hind feet white half way up to the knees; one fore foot white, and a long and very narrow blaze in his face; no brands perceptible that I have noticed.  The above reward will be paid for the apprehension of the thief, and delivery of the horse to me at this place, or a reward of twenty-five dollars for the horse.
7-39-tf                                                                         John Winship.
                                               
                                    Tyler, Texas, Aug. 19th, 1862. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Gunsmiths Wanted!

            We want 30 or 40 Gunsmiths immediately, to fill a  Government contract for the State of Texas, for 5,000 guns—to work in the

New Gun Factory

of Short, Biscoe & Co., Tyler, Texas.  The most liberal wages will be paid for good workmen.
7-39-2m.                                                                     Short, Biscoe & Co.
           
Shreveport News copy two months, and send bill to Reporter office. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Administrator's Notice.

            That on the 30th day of June 1862, at the Probate Court of Smith county, letters of Administration were granted to the undersigned on the estate of Louis Todd, dec'd, this is therefore to notify all persons indebted to said estate, to come forward and settle up, and all those holding claims against said estate will present them as the statute requires, this July 29th 1862.
                                               
                                    Zimri Tate.  Administrator. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Executors Notice.

            That on the 30th day of June 1862 at the Probate Court thereof, letters testamentary, were granted to R. W. Chapman and Martin Casey, on the estate of Sarah Jane Taylor deceased, this is therefore to notify all persons indebted to said estate, to come forward and make payment, and all those holding claims against said estate will present them as the law requires, this July 30th 1862.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman.
                                               
                                    Martin Casey.
                                               
                                                Executors.

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 1
           
Lost.—A small sack, containing some clothing and some corn.  The sack was lost on the 3d of August, between Dr. Warren's residence and Mr. Boren's wool factory.  Any person finding it, will confer a favor on a soldier by leaving it at the Reporter office. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration was granted to the undersigned on the estate of Mary Massey dec'd, on the 28th day of July 1862, by the Probate Court of Smith county.  This is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted will please settle.
           
Starrville, August 2nd 1862.
                                               
                                    F. L. Lowery.  Adm'r. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by Richard Yarbrough, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. in Precinct No. 1, Smith county, one bay horse, black mane and tail, somewhat disfigured, has a scar on his left thigh, near the hip bone, about three years old past, branded S. T. N. on his left shoulder; appraised at seventy-five dollars. July 8th, 1862.
                                               
                                                R. W. Chapman, Clerk. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

J. H. Warren, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler, Texas.

Offers his professional services to the public.
Office East side of the public 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Davenport & Goodman,
Physicians & Surgeons,
Tyler, Texas,

Will promptly answer to all calls in the line of their profession.  They have formed a partnership for the practice of Medicine and Surgery, and will be found at all time, (unless professionally absent,) at the Drug Store of Davenport & Co., in the brick building on the North-West corner of the Public Square.  The attention of both will be given in all cases when necessary, without additional charge.
                                               
                                    Jo. W. Davenport, M. D. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

M. A. Long                              R. B. Hubbard.
Long & Hubbard,
Attorneys at Law,
Tyler, Texas,

            Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial District, and in the U. S. and Federal Courts at Tyler.                                                                        [v5n41-1y] 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
           
Tyler, Smith county, Texas, June 17, 1856.
           
v1n46-tf 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Stephen Reaves,
Attorney at Law,

Will practice in the Supreme and District Court of the State, and in the United States District Courts, of the Western District of Texas.
           
Office, at Tyler.
           
sept. 6, 1854.                                                                           v1n1-tf 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

"Tyler House."
Tyler, Smith Co. Texas.
J. M. Williams, Proprietor

            Having taken the above named house which has just been vacated by its former well known lessee. (Rev. A. G. Irvine,) I respectfully solicit a call from its old patrons and friends, and the public generally.  Extensive repairs and additions will be immediately made to the Hotel buildings, and comfortable quarters insured to all who may stop with me.  Attached to the Hotel is a large Livery Stable, where horses will be well attended to; and at all times travellers can be forwarded to any point, on the shortest notice.
           
Tyler, Dec'r 12, 1860.  1y 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Saw-Mill.

            The undersigned has removed his Steam Saw-Mill to his new pinery, 8 miles South of Tyler, on the Larrissa road, where, in a few days he will be ready to fill all orders on shortest notice, at the following rates, which are CASH, only.

Prices of Lumber.

Square Lumber per 100                                                            $1,25
"           "            "            over 20 feet                                          1,50
Ripped "            "                                                                        1,50
v5n26  1y                                                                     J. N. McKinley. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 21, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Notice!

            The undersigned offers for sale his valuable Residence, containing three hundred and seventy-three (373) acres, together with cotton gin, mill, & thresher.  There are about one hundred and seventy-five (175) acres in a state of good cultivation, lying about one mile N. W. from Tyler, and about 1-2 mile West from the Male Academy.  Said farm is situated on the Tyler and Dallas road.  Terms of sale will be made known to those who wish to purchase.                      [7.38-1m.]                 J. C. Moore. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Any person having a hack and pair of horses to hire, can get a good price for them for several days, by calling at this office.  We guarantee that good care will be taken of them if hired. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Rev. J. W. Fields requests us to say that he will preach at the Methodist Church next Sunday.  The church being no longer needed for a hospital, has been prepared again for worship. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
The question of procuring clothing for our troops this winter is becoming one of startling interest.  It is well understood that all the efforts of the Government in this direction will not succeed in meeting the demand, and that much must depend upon private contributions.  Appeal after appeal is being circulated through the country from the various regiments [fold in paper] assistance.  A people who have never yet failed to meet emergencies, will not now be slow to respond.  Let every wheel and loom throughout the whole country be kept busy, with the single purpose of clothing our soldiers.  Let those who have relatives and friends in the army, go to preparing clothing expressly for them.  Let the clothing be ready as soon as possible, and we guarantee that means will be found to convey it to those who need it.—Remember that if a failure is made at home in this respect, much suffering among our troops must be the result. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
If there is one thing more than all else, calculated to inspire in the mind of a stranger a small appreciation and opinion of Tyler and its citizens, that thing surely is the neglected, the wretched, the disgraceful condition in which our graveyard now is, and in which it has been permitted to remain for a long series of years.  A few years ago, we remember, a feeble effort was made to put it in better fix, which resulted in shrubbing off some of the larger brush.  This amounted to about the same as setting out five bushes to one—for we are sure they are thicker now than at first.  If the yard had then been thoroughly grubbed, and the brush, large and small, been taken out and burned, future trouble would have been avoided.  It is not too late yet to attend to this matter, and now that crops are out of the way, and business generally in a state of semi-suspension, let us, as citizens of a civilized country, attend to it.  We have not a relative buried in the graveyard here, but we feel an interest in this matter, and are willing to pay our part.  Who now will take the affair in hand, raise the money, employ hands, and see the work properly executed? 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
           
By a card from Brig. Gen. McCulloch, and a general order by Col. J. W. Speight, to-day published, it will be seen that the former has gone for a field of more active service, and that the latter has assumed command of the Post of Tyler.  General McCulloch and his entire staff started for their field of operations on Monday morning last.  In the card above referred to, written on the march and returned to us for publication, Gen. McCulloch pays the citizens of Tyler and vicinity, as well as of the surrounding country, a compliment which, whether fully merited or not, will be appreciated and most gratefully received.  There are few men, occupying high positions, like Henry E. McCulloch,--who, while exhibiting all the high qualifications of an able General and gallant soldier, still feels and exercises all those nobler properties of the devoted christian and polished gentleman.  Without ostentation or bigotry, he claims to be but the equal of every honest man and true patriot; and his ear is ever open to the claims of the low as well as the high—ready alike to deal justice to the humblest soldier in the ranks and the highest officer under his control.  It was natural that such a man should gather upon his staff men whose characteristics were congenial to his own; and we venture nothing when we say that the officers of the staff are as complete gentlemen and gallant soldiers as Texas can boast.
           
In returning the thanks of the people of Tyler and vicinity for the compliment paid them through the card referred to above, we beg leave to say in behalf of the people, that however high an estimation Gen. McCulloch and staff may have formed of them, it cannot overreach that entertained by the people of this community for them.
           
But however much we may regret the necessity which has caused Gen. McCulloch to retire, we still find a pleasure in announcing Col. J. W. Speight in [fold in paper] tation of being an accomplished military officer and thorough gentleman.  May he by his course here, win the esteem of the troops and people, and when he shall retire carry with him the blessings and good wishes of all. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
           
We are now suffering from a long drought.  Signs of rain for several days; none has yet fallen. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 1

A Card.

                                                                        Headquarters,                                         }
                                               
                        Camp on Sabine, Aug. 25, 1862.            }
           
On leaving Tyler for active duties in the field, Brig. Gen. McCulloch feels it a grateful duty, for himself and the Government, to acknowledge with sincere thankfulness, the generous support he has received and the patriotic efforts that have been made to aid the cause of our country, during his official sojourn among them, by the people of Tyler and the surrounding country.  The citizens have manifested a noble spirit generally, in sustaining him in the discharge of the arduous and delicate duties devolved upon him.  Order had to be established, where great confusion and military destitution existed.  Munitions of war and supplies had to be gathered in a country already heavily drained.  Aided and encouraged by the citizens of the country, he has succeeded beyond the hopes of the most sanguine.  Heavy responsibilities stood in the way, and he assumed them, looking to the Government and the country to sustain him.
           
The ladies ever foremost in good works, have earned new claims to the high position they occupy.  Through the burning heat of June, July and August, they have toiled in making tents and other needful articles for the army; and when disease had filled the hospitals, they appeared as angels of mercy attending upon the sick soldiers—the defenders of their altars and their honor, against the ruthless enemy of our country.
           
The citizens of the neighboring towns and counties have nobly responded to the solicitations sent them for contributions of hospital stores.  The sick soldier, when suffering from disease or wounds on the tented field, will bless such citizens and such ladies.  The soldier in health will be stimulated to fight with more unconquerable spirit for them.
           
To the immediate citizens of Tyler and vicinity, Gen. McCulloch desires to express for himself and his staff feelings of heartfelt esteem.  Their social virtues and kindness can never be forgotten, but will remain as a green spot in memory through life.  To bid adieu to them is more akin to severing family ties, than parting with friends of but recent acquaintance.  May the be the recipients of every needed blessing, and long live in peace and happiness in the society they adorn.
           
By [fold in paper]
                                               
                        Jno. Henry Brown,
                                               
                                    Major & A. A. Gen'l. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 1
                                               
                        Headquarters, Tyler, Texas,  }
                                               
                        August 21, 1862.                  }
General Order             }
           
No. 19            }
           
I.  All officers arriving at this Post, or in this vicinity, in command of troops, whether under orders to rendezvous at this place or march to other points, will report at once to the Commanding Officer of this Post; and will furnish him with any number of men he may require of them during their stay in this vicinity.
           
By order of Brig. Gen. Henry E. McCulloch.
                                               
                        John Henry Brown,
                                               
                                    Major & A. A. General. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 2
                                               
                        Headquarters,                                     }
                                               
                        Tyler, Texas, Aug. 25th, 1862.            }
General Order No. 21.
           
I.  By virtue of an order from Brig-Gen. H. E. McCulloch, I have this day assumed the command of this Post.
           
II.  Lieutenant Jno. [fold in paper] Jones, Adjutant of Speight's Reg't, is assigned to duty as acting assistant Adjutant General.
           
III.  All officers of the army visiting this Post on business or otherwise, will report to these Head Quarters.
                                               
                        J. W. Speight.
                                               
            S'r. Col. Commanding Post. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
           
Died—At the residence of his brother, S. S. Gibbs, in Tyler, on the 26th inst., of flux, Charlie R. Gibbs.
           
The deceased during his sickness, had every advantage of the comforts of home and the kindest attentions of physicians, relatives and friends; but death had claimed him, and nothing earthly could wrest him from the grasp of the grim monster.  In social life he had many friends, and as a soldier he performed his duty.  Peace to his ashes. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Administrators Notice.

Letters of Administration having been granted to the undersigned at the August Term, A. D. 1862, of the Probate Court of Smith County Texas, on [fold in paper] Notice is hereby given to all persons having claims against said estate to exhibit the same and have them registered in the manner and within the time prescribed by law, or they will be forever barred, and all persons indebted to said estate are required to make immediate payment.
                                               
                                                August 27th 1862.
                                               
                                                Nathaniel Killough 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration having been granted to the undersigned at the December Term A. D. 1862, of the Probate Court of Cherokee County Texas, on the estate of James H. McCarty dec'd.  Notice is hereby given to all persons having claims against said estate to exhibit the same, and have them registered in the manner and within the time prescribed by law, or they will be forever barred, and all persons indebted to said estate are required to make immediate payment.
                                               
                                                August 28th 1862.
                                               
                                                Nathaniel Killough. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Runaway Negro in Jail.

            Taken up by O. W. Byers and committed to the Jail of Wood County, by E. R. Shuford, Esqr., on the 22nd day of July 1862, a certain negro boy who says his name is George, and that he belongs to James H. Batts of Burleson County, said boy is about 22 or 23 years old, and will weigh about 140 pounds, he had on when taken up, coarse cotton clothing and an old worn out casamier [sic] or cotton hat.  The owner of said slave is hereby required to come forward prove property, pay charges, and take him out, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.
                                               
                                                A. Baird, jailor Wood Co.,
           
August 28th, 1862. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
           
Wanted to Hire!—A good, faithful negro woman, to do house work for a small family—a good washer and ironer.  Apply at Reporter Office for information. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Gunsmiths Wanted!

            We want 30 or 40 GUNSMITHS immediately, to fill a Government contract for the State of Texas, for 5,000 guns—to work in the

New Gun Factory

of Short, Biscoe & Co., Tyler, Texas.  The most liberal wages will be paid for good workmen.
7-39-2m.                                                                     Short, Biscoe & Co.
           
Shreveport News copy two months, and send bill to Reporter office. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Administrator's Notice.

            That on the 30th day of June 1862, at the Probate Court of Smith county, letters of Administration were granted to the undersigned on the estate of Louis Todd, dec'd, this is therefore to notify all persons indebted to said estate, to come forward and settle up, and all those holding claims against said estate will present them as the statute requires, this July 29th 1862.
                                               
                                    Zimri Tate.  Administrator. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Executor's Notice.

            That on the 30th day of June 1862 at the Probate Court thereof, letters testamentary were granted to R. W. Chapman and Martin Casey, on the estate of Sarah Jane Taylor deceased, this is therefore to notify all persons indebted to said estate, to come forward and make payment, and all those holding claims against said estate will present them as the law requires, this July 30th 1862.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman.
                                               
                                    Martin Casey.
                                               
                                                Executors. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 4, c. 1
           
Lost.—A small sack, containing some clothing and some corn.  The sack was lost on the 3d of August, between Dr. Warren's residence and Mr. Boren's wool factory.  Any person finding it, will confer a favor on a soldier by leaving it at the Reporter office. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration were granted to the undersigned on the estate of Mary Massey dec'd, on the 29th day of July 1862, by the Probate Court of Smith county.  This is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted will please settle.
           
Starrville, August 2nd 1862                                        F. L. Lowery, Adm'r. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by Richard Yarbrough and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. in Precinct No. 1, Smith county, one bay horse, black mane and tail, somewhat disfigured, has a scar on his left thigh, near the hip bone, about three years old past, branded S. T. N. on his left shoulder, appraised at seventy-five dollars.
                                               
                                                July 8th, 1862.
                                               
                                                R. W. Chapman, Clerk. 

TYLER REPORTER, August 28, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Notice!

            The undersigned offers for sale his valuable Residence, containing three hundred and seventy-three (373) acres, together with cotton gin, mill & thresher.  There are about one hundred and seventy-five (175) acres in a state of good cultivation, lying about one mile N. W. from Tyler, and about 1-2 mile West from the Male Academy.  Said farm is situated on the Tyler and Dallas road.  Terms of sale will be made known to those who wish to purchase.
[7.38-1m]                                                                    J. C. Moore. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 1, c. 1, c. 3
           
Swift Retribution.—The Washington Telegraph of the 15th inst., says, some weeks ago, a negro man in Saline township, for attempting the chastity of a lady, the wife of a volunteer, who was promptly hung.  Last Monday night a negro man who had been sometime runaway, and who had attempted the life of one of our citizens endeavoring to arrest him was taken in this vicinity and hung before day-light.
           
As a matter of humanity our citizens should inform themselves of particulars of all these facts and make their slaves well acquainted with them.  If any of the poor deluded fools have entertained the idea that the present times give them any impunity to commit acts unbecoming their station, it is a mercy to undeceive them, before their lives become forfeit to their ignorance.  Some of them may be misled by evil influences, to entertain ideas which will bring upon them sure destruction.—Shreveport South Western. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
We will pay the biggest price, in cash, for brown paper that will do to print on.  If you have any let us know by mail. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
We see that Gen. D. B. Martin, has a fine lot of "Army Regulations," printed in a nice book form for sale, every person interested should purchase one, as he wishes to dispose of them as early as possible, they can be seen at his office over Boren's store.  Price $7,50. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Dr. R. T. Lively, Dr. Underwood, C. K. Wood, B. W. Stidham, W. O. Stidham, H. L. Cook, and John Stanley, having been suspected of connection with the band of robbers which was discovered to exist in Cook County, were arrested by order of the Chief Justice of Grason [sic] County and sent to this place for trial or commitment.  On Wednesday morning they were brought before B. L. Goodman Confederate Commissioner and duly arraigned.  The case was set for examinations on the 13th day of Nov. next, and the parties admitted to bail in the sum of two hundred dollars for their appearance at that time, upon the charge of a conspiracy to murder and rob. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 2, c. 1

Confederate Court.

            This court addjourned [sic] last Thursday at 9 oclock, P.M. closing a term of eight weeks.  We learn that the session has been one of great labor and that an immense amount of business was transacted.  Three clerks were employed constantly in writing the minutes of the court and the Receivers and their assistance [sic] kept diligently at work untill [sic] the close of the term.  A large amount of money arising from Sequestration, will be paid immediately, by the order of the court into the Confederate treasury.  The Receivers presented the first annual report of their proceedings, which ought to be published and generelly [sic] read.  It is a clear able and intrusting [sic] document, showing the manner of their proceedings under the sequestration act.  We hope to find room for its publication.  It has seemed to us that the importance and value of the labours [sic] of the Confederate Court in admineristing [sic] the sequestration act are not sufficiently appreciated.  The cruelties and outrages of our base enemies have been employed since the war begun [sic], and are still employed no only in making widows and orphans, but in plundering and destroying their only means of support, burning houses, furniture, food and clothing, stealing negroes, and laying in ruin the homes and the hopes of thousands of our citisens [sic].  To raise a fund to compensate as far as possible these hopes is the object and end of the labor of the Confederate Court.  The fund is raised from property and debts of alien enemies, and the Government itself is the trustee for its disbursment [sic].  It is believed that this distuct [sic] will contribute to this fund more than ten millions of dollars, and that the entire cost of realizing and paying it over to the Treasury may not exceed two and a half per cent, and certainly will not reach five per cent of the gross amount realized.
           
The next term will commence in Thyler the first Monday in April 1863 at which time a Grand Jury will be empanneled [sic].  The Judge proceeds to Houston to open a term there the third monday [sic] in November which is to continue untell [sic] the middle of March. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 3, c. 2

Obituary.
By Mollie E. Moore.

Killed on the plains of Manassas, on 13th August 1862.  James H. Thomas, of Austin, Texas, aged 21 years, a member of Company(B) 4th Texas Regiment.

The "Rebel" Soldier Boy.

The air hung heavy o'er the plain,
And on the earth's proud brest, [sic]
Mid blood, and strife--with friend and foe,
           
The brave were "gone to rest."
The work was done—the harvest field
Was reaped, and thro' the storm,
Red banners hung in reeking folds,
           
O'er many a stiffening form. 

And blood that warmed one youthful breast,
Deaped [Seaped?] out upon the plain,
Nor felt the brow one soothing hand,
           
To ease its dying pain.
No tender breast with pitying care,
Pillowed the noble head,--
The "rebel boy" at set of sun,
           
Alone among the dead

The "rebel boy" whom morn beheld,
In helm and crest arrayed,
Now ere
his battle bed of death,
           
Beneath the shadow's made.
Ere envious Heaven quenched the light,
O'er youthful valor thrown,
Proud glory's halo on his crest,
           
One moment lingering shown. 

And calm amid the storm he stood,
His cry the voice of War,
His gleaming blade the victor's guide,
           
His eye the battle star!
Foremost he reached the captured guns,
Proudest of all his cry,
When with the watchword on his lips,
           
Prouder than all—to die! 

The "rebel boy" his lifeblood ebbed,
(Stern battles crimson foam,)
And whitening lips breathed out a wail,
           
"My sunny Texas home!"
And his last cry spent its agony,
As the red tide laved the sod,
"My home! my country's bleeding breast!
           
"My mother,"
and my God!" 

He died, no hand smoothed down the limbs,
So still in beauty there,
No gentle voice with cadence low,
           
Breathed forth a farewell prayer.
But calm upon the shadowed plain,
His young brow moist with blood,
Mid din, and strife—with friend and foe,
           
His spirit sought its God. 

But Texas clasps her martyred son,
Close to her mail clad breast,
And lo!  the halo of his fame,
           
Enwreaths her glorious creast!
And tender hearts will yearning flee,
Where pitying breezes toy,
O'er him, alone among the dead,
           
The "rebel" soldier boy! 

Sylvan Dell, Oct. 23d 1862. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 3, c. 2

Administrators Notice.

            That on the 29th of September 1862, letters of administration were granted to B. H. White on the estate of James L. Smith dec'd, this is therefore to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them as the law directs, and those indebted to said estate will please pay up as early as possible.              B. H. White.  Adm'r.
7-49 6t 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 3, c. 3
To the People of the Trans Mississippi Department, composed of the States of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas
.
           
At no period since the commencement of the contest in which we are now engaged, has there existed a more pressing necessity for active and zealous co-operation on the part of the people of these States with the military authorities, than at the present moment.  The partial occupation of the Mississippi River Line by our enemies has so far impeded communication with the other States of the Confederacy, as to compel those charged with the duty of providing for the wants of our army, to seek for and develope [sic] new sources of supply.  Our army is in urgent need of blankets and clothing of every description, to enable them to withstand the rigor of the approaching winter, as well as to successfully oppose the invaders of our soil, and they can be furnished with but little from the other side of the Mississippi, or by the few manufactories now established in these States.
           
In this emergency, Maj. Gen'l T. H. Holmes commanding in this Department, relying confidently on the patriotism of the people, directs me to make an appeal to them for that assistance which all can afford to give without much individual inconvenience, and which, if promptly furnished, will greatly promote the success of our army.  Every family throughout this Department, possessed of a spinning wheel and loom, is requested to manufacture as large a quantity of cloth (both woolen and cotton) as the raw material at its command will permit.  Those who have no facilities for spinning or weaving, may assist in the good work by making up shirts, drawers, pantaloons, coats and overcoats, and by knitting stockings, making hats or caps, and shoes; while those who have looms adapted to the purpose, can furnish blankets or some other article answering the same object.
           
The clerk of each county in the States named is requested, either to take charge of or appoint some suitable person to receive and forward all goods manufactured for army purposes in the county in which he resides, to the nearest Post Quartermaster of the Confederate States Army, who will be furnished with funds to pay the same on delivery, with cost of transportation added.  For his services, the agent who may attend to the collection and forwarding of these goods, will be allowed a reasonable compensation by the Post Quartermaster to whom he delivers them.  No limit will be placed on the prices of the articles thus furnished—the General commanding having confidence that a patriotic people will not extort upon their government in its hour of need.  The Post Quartermasters who receive supplies in the way indicated, are requested to forward them to these headquarters without delay, and, as far as possible, to keep this office advised of the amount of clothing being made in their vicinity for the army.
           
Merchants in these States who have for sale clothing suitable for army purposes are requested to furnish immediately to the nearest Post Quartermaster, a memorandum invoice of the articles, with prices annexed, to assist him in making purchases for the Quartermaster's Department.  Authorized purchasing agents are also abroad in various localities and it is expected that the people will aid them in their efforts to procure supplies, by advising them as to the places where stored.
           
The Major General commanding does not deem it necessary to do more than inform the people of this Department regarding the necessities of the troops under his command, and suggest a plan by which they can be promptly and comfortably clad.  He feels assured that this appeal will suffice to put in operation every spinning wheel and loom throughout the limits of the Department, and that neighbor will vie with neighbor, and community with community, in praiseworthy efforts to furnish clothing for the army.
                                               
                                                Jno. D. Adams,
                                               
                        Capt. and Acting Chief Quartermaster,
                                               
                                    Trans Mississippi District.
           
Little Rock, Ark., Aug. 22, 1862.
           
Capt. J. P. McKinney, A. Q. M., will appoint Agents from Austin to Palestine, and Capt. J. C. Kerbey, A. Q. M. will appoint Agents from Tyler, Smith county, to the line of Arkansas, to receive clothing to be forwarded to the soldiers of the army.
           
Names of the Agents will be published as soon as they have been appointed.
           
v7-n47-5t 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 4, c. 1
                                               
                                    Little Rock, Arkansas.
                                               
                                                Sept. 11th 1862.
           
Editor Reporter:  In your issue the 19th of August I observe quite a number of names published as deserters from the Army of the South-West, and among them I am surprised to see one evidently intended for my own.  That it is an infamous lie I upon my character, intentions, or desire, the following document will show.  I take great pleasure in referring to it, merely remarking that the publication must have been made through ignorance or maliciously, and is a lasting dishonor and disgrace upon those who are responsible for it; while it can never injure me.

Army of the Confederate States
Soldier's Discharge.

            I certify that S. H. B. Cundiff, a private in Captain Noble's company (A) of the 17th Regiment, Texas Cavalry Volunteers C. S. A., was enlisted by Captain Thos. J. Johnson, on the 1st day of February 1862, to serve one year.  He was born in Hamshire county, in the State of Virginia, is 26 years old 5 feet 10 inches high, fair complexion, blue eyes and dark hair, and when enlisted, was by occupation a practical Printer.
           
Said soldier is entitled to his discharge under the "Conscript Act," by reason of his being a Printer and actually engaged in the publication of a Newspaper at the time of his enrollment.
                                               
                                                S. M. Noble,
                                               
                                                Commanding Company.
           
Discharged this 16th day of July 1862, at Brownsville Ark.
                                               
                                                Jas. R. Taylor,
                                               
                                                Commanding 17th Reg't
                                               
                                                            Texas Cavalry.
           
This is all that is necessary for me to do at the present, it shoes that I was legally discharged on the 16th of July.  In this unpleasant matter, at some future time, when all men are free and equal, I shall take the matter in hand again, and will fix the responsibility on some one, and then brand it if necessary, as a lie, in his face with steel, or his back with lead.
           
Other men who are there published as deserters, had their discharge authenticated at least fifteen days before the publication was made.  Who is responsible for this?  I refer to Mr. [illegible] and Geo. W. Bartin of Nacogdoches.
                                               
                                                Very Respectfully &c.
v7n48 3t                                                                                   S. H. B. Cundiff.
           
Marshall Republican publish one week and send bill to this office. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Sale of Stock.

            On Thursday Nov. 13th, I will offer for sale to the highest bidder at my residence in Garden Valley, Six or seven brood MARES.  One fine STALLION.  1 good buggy HORSE.  About 50 head of pork HOGS.  And a lot of COWS and CALVES and BEEF CATTLE.  Probably a variety of other articles may be offered at the same time.  Sale to commence at 10 oclock A.M.  Terms Cash.  Oct. 13th 1862.
v6n47-3t                                                                                  J. L. Davidson. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

Estray Notices.

            Taken up by Wm. R. Singleton, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. in precinct No. 1, Smith county, one sorrel Mare, 14 hands high, about 12 or 14 years old, branded on the right hip with the letter O.  Appraised at fifty dollars.  Aug. 7t6h 1862.
           
Also, taken up by A. Estess, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. one dark bay mare, with a star in her face, some saddle marks, about 16 or 17 hands high, about ten years old, and branded with the little p on the left shoulder.  Appraised at $75.  Oct. 7th, 1862.                                                               R. W. Chapman, Clk.
7-46-3t 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

No Ice.

            The through [sic] bred Canadian Stallion, Secession, will stand the Fall season at my stable, 10 miles east of Tyler.  Terms, $10 for insurance.
           
Sept. 15th 1862.                                                                    W. W. Ross. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 4, c. 2

Administrators Notice.

            That H. S. Cobb and Moses Watters Administrators of the estate of C. M. Watters dec'd have filed their exhibits for final settlement of said estate at the Probate Court of Smith county, to be held at Tyler on the last Monday in September, this inst; this is therefore to notify all persons interested therein, to appear at that time and show cause if any they have, why said settlement shall not be made and them finally discharged.
Sept. 1st 1862.                                                                         R. W. Chapman,
                                               
                                                Cl's, C. C. S. Co. 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Strayed or Stolen.

            From the undersigned about the 20th of Sept. last, a bay Horse, 10 years old, star in his forehead, a little roan on his back, roach mane, some saddle marks, 3 white feet, branded 13 on the left shoulder, heavy [illegible], on the pony order.  Any information in regard to said horse will be thankfully received and suitably rewarded.
                                               
                                                C. D. Perry.
Tyler, Oct. 1st.                                      7-43-3t 

TYLER REPORTER, October 30, 1862, p. 4, c. 3

Executors Notice.

            On the 29th day of Sept. 1862, letters testamentary, with the will annexed, were granted to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Smith county, on the estate of Elizabeth Singleton, dec'd—any person holding claims against said estate will present them duly authenticated, and those indebted please pay.
                                               
                                                Wm. R. Singleton.
Sept. 29th, 1862.   7-45-6t 

TYLER REPORTER, November 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 1-3

Receivers' Report.

To the Hon. Wm. P. Hill, Judge, &c.
           
The undersigned Receivers of the Confederate States for the Tyler section of the Eastern District of Texas, in compliance with a suggestion of the Court, unite in making the following summary statement of their progress in the discharge of their duties during the past year, viz:  from the 12th day of October, 1861 (the date of their appointment) to the present time.
           
Our official duties were commenced by the publication of a circular, giving notice to the people of the District of the passage and contents of the Sequestration Act of the Confederate States Congress, and of the contemplated mode of its execution.—Being aware that many persons entertained very erroneous views on the subject, and labored under prejudices against the law, which were likely to retard its prompt and accurate execution, and as a consequence produce interminable and expensive citation, we felt it a duty by all means in our power to remove those unfounded prejudices, and so fairly to explain the real objects and operations of the law, as to reconcile the public mind to it, and to induce all concerned therein to co-operate in good faith with us, in accomplishing all its wise and benificent [sic] provisions with the least possible expense and delay.  We are happy to be able to say that our exertions in this respect have not been without success.  With comparatively few exceptions, the merchants and others indebted to Alien Enemies, have, upon application, seemed to vie with each other in disclosing fully, fairly and promptly all the information required by the law.  As a general rule we have visited every part of the District, and offered our personal services to each party, to draft his answer to the interrogatories attached to the writ of garnishment.  This offer being thankfully accepted in nearly all cases, we thereby became acquainted with the character and means of most persons with whom we had to do, and this information must be of great value in the subsequent part of our labors.  Our Clerks or Assistants have also held commissions as Deputy Marshals, so that we were at all times ready to serve process and take answers in all parts of the District, whenever and wherever we met with persons proper to be so served.  In this manner we have carefully canvassed the District more than once.  Owing however to the existence of the war, and consequent absence in the army of so large a portion of our citizens, we have not as yet been able to take the answers of all who may probably possess valuable information and owe many debts to Alien Enemies.  But up to this time we have been able by these means to take and file, digest and collate, one thousand three hundred and fifty-eight answers.
           
These answers we have carefully digested in a book, (prepared by order of the Court) showing in tabular form all the debts and property reported by each garnishee.  And the contents of this first Book of Digests have been carefully collated in a second Book under the name of each Alien Enemy to whom the same belonged.  The Alien Enemies whose debts and other property are so collated amount to one thousand one hundred and forty seven (1147) in number.
           
The aggregate amounts of debts of Alien Enemies admitted by the debtors amounts to about, of principal                                                                                $2552000.00
and estimated interest to Oct. 1, 1862,                                     $321000.00
making the aggregate of                                                         $2873000.00
           
From the character of this great mass of debts, embracing the delinquencies of many years of the commercial men of the District, it is not to be expected that the whole of this sum will be realized by collection.  It is also possible that some of the debts reported may turn out to belong to citizens of the Confederacy, and not to Alien Enemies.  Yet we are persuaded that recent debts of existing business men and firms will favorably compare with any other in the Confederacy.
           
Besides these debts there have been duly reported for sequestration about four hundred and twenty-six tracts of land, amounting to about two hundred and forty thousand acres, exclusive of about two hundred town lots.  These lands have been listed for taxation in the various counties where situated, both for the State and Confederate tax, and the latter tax generally paid.  Taxes due the State for previous years have also been paid.
           
In addition to the debts and lands reported for sequestration, there are many small lots of personal property reported to the Receivers and put in their charge, consisting of slaves, horses, cattle, sheep, hogs, and many other articles, including a great variety of patent medicines.  Some of these have been sold, and some yet remain to be sold.  The amended law, requiring all property to be sold at public auction, will occasion a great increase of labor and expense, in selling personal property, and it is believed result in loss to the fund.
           
There have already been decrees of sequestration rendered in this Court in one thousand three hundred and nineteen (1319) cases, and final judgments rendered on the Debt Docket against one hundred and seventy-seven (177) persons.
           
Owing to the great accumulation of office work there is much yet to be done to prepare all the reported and sequestrated cases for final judgment.—And here we may be permitted to remark, that owing to the scarcity of suitable clerk labor and to the increased expense of living at this time, we shall be obliged to increase the rate of compensation heretofore allowed for that kind of service.  But in yielding to the necessity of such increase of clerk labor and rate of compensation, we shall not overlook the duty of due economy in all our expenditures.
           
The total deficiency of books and stationery in this part of the State will make it necessary that we send East of the Mississippi River for supplies.  This extraordinary expense we see not means of obviating.
           
We have not as yet applied for decrees to sell any of the lands sequestrated, (except one tract under special circumstances) and propose to postpone so doing (unless a different policy shall be required by the Court or the Government) until our people shall have returned from the war.  It seems to us unjust towards our brave soldiers to offer for sale these valuable lands in their absence, and thus exclude them from all participation in the purchase;--and equally impolitic in the Government to dispose of so much valuable land in the absence of, perhaps, seven tenths of those most likely to desire to purchase.  Such a course could hardly fail to place most of these valuable lands in the hands of speculators, at nominal prices.  We suggest, however, that in any case where a person living in the neighborhood of any particular tract of land shall agree with the Receivers to open the biddings for such tract, at what may be considered a fair price, that such tract may be offered for sale, either with directions in the decree that the biddings open at that price, or notice in the advertisement to the same effect.  It is important that every thing be avoided calculated to discredit these sales, and hence we think it impolitic in any case to withdraw land from sale on account of inadequate bids, except where a minimum price has been mentioned in the advertisement.
           
It may not be improper here to mention what it really affords us pleasure to mention, that all the officers of the Court, including our Clerks and Deputy Marshals, have uniformly exhibited the greatest possible energy, zeal and skill in the discharge of their respective duties, and we respectfully submit that the year's work of the Court and its officers in this section of the District, the circumstances being considered, ought to be regarded by the Court and the Government as altogether satisfactory.
           
In conclusion, the undersigned cannot refrain giving expression to the lively hope with which they are inspired, that before it becomes their duty to make another annual report to the Court, their beloved country will have achieved its independence by its victorious arms, and that peace and prosperity will have again blessed the land, and that they may be enabled to look forward with rational hope to ages of progress and prosperity unequalled in the annals of nations.
           
Respectfully submitted,
                                               
                                                M. A. Long,
                                               
                                                T. A. Patillo,
                                               
                                                Jas. H. Starr. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
           
Write to the Soldier.—Persons who have friends in the army (and who has not?) should write to them often, remarks the Charleston Courier.  Nothing, aside from the substantial comforts of camp life in the form of good clothing and other similar et ceteras, is so much appreciated by the weary, toil worn soldier, as a hearty, cheerful letter from home.  We should set aside certain days in each week in which to write to our soldier friends.  Any one who has visited our camps and witnessed the eagerness with which the soldier inquires for letters how diligently they are read when received and how carefully he preserves these little missives of love and friendship—cannot fail to realize the amount of good he may do in this respect. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 1, c. 3

Mail Matters Again.

            Two or three weeks ago we indulged in a rather plain and spirited complaint about mail matters, referring directly at the time to the route from Vicksburg by way of Shreveport, Marshall and Cemp's [Camp's?] Ferry, on the Sabine river.  As we intended and hoped, the article then published fell under the attention of the post masters along the route, and we are now in receipt of two letters concerning the matter.  We should have replied before now but for the fact that we have been absent from home since that publication until now.  We have now only to say that we considered the complaint truthful and proper at the time it was published, and none too strong for the circumstances—though then, as now, we had no intention or disposition to become "abusive or scurrilous" except so far as the really guilty were concerned.  We knew not then, nor do we yet know, where the fault lay, but fault there was, and we spoke in a pointed and plain way in order to bring the matter certainly to notice.—We like the bold manner in which the post masters at Shreveport and Marshall have spoken out, and having no reason to question their veracity, we take pleasure in exculpating them from blame.  Let others along the line "clear their skirts" and perform their duties, and we shall have regular and correct mails.
           
Our duty as a journalist we apprehend to be to labor for the public good, and in the article referred to we attempted to discharge that duty, without intending to blame or abuse any one not guilty, but simply by uttering what we believed to be true.  If the Marshall and Shreveport papers published the former article, they are requested to publish this also. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
           
We see by some of our exchanges that the Yankee authorities have ejected from Memphis the wife and family of Captain R. H. Brown, giving them permission to only carry away such wearing apparel as was upon their persons, after they had taken possession of all their household goods and valuables.  The Captain's connection with the partisan service was the probable cause of this unparalleled outrage upon a defenceless lady and her children. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
After an exceedingly dry spell of weather, it has again clouded up, and we have in a day or two had rain enough to lay the dust, and probably benefit the grain crops.  At the present writing it is turning cold, with indications of snow.  Health generally good through the country we believe, and everything quiet. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Fires are getting to be quite common in the towns through the country.  The last number of the Republican announces a fire in Marshall, which resulted in considerable damage.  Dr. Joseph Taylor was the principal sufferer, we believe, his residence being burned.  It is now the season for fires—we are compelled to keep them in all our houses.  Let it be remembered, that a house or town will burn down as easily when set on fire by accident as when the torch is applied by the hand of the incendiary.  We should guard against both alike. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
We have been shown a counterfeit two dollar bill, of Smith County Treasury Warrants, which has been sent to the County Clerk here.  The bill is different in almost every particular from the genuine.  The type is different, and the whole face of the bill shows the counterfeit plainly.  The wording of the counterfeit and genuine is different, the genuine reading thus:  "The Treasurer of Smith County will pay Two Dollars to Bearer," and the counterfeit, "The Treasurer of Smith County will pay to Bearer Two Dollars."  The signature of the counterfeit cannot be exactly mad out, while all the genuine bills are plainly signed by R. W. Chapman, Clerk, &c.  There are two different issues of Smith County Notes, with different dates, and in some the type is different, but the wording is the same in all.  Such is the case with the two dollar issue.  Caution will always detect the counterfeit. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
An Immense Train.—During the last four days the immense train of waggons [sic] brought by our army from Kentucky, has been passing through the city in a continuous stream, making a ceaseless rumble that might be compared to a "protracted meeting of earthquakes.  Allowing that these waggons [sic]—all drawn by good conditional stock—travel twenty miles a day, this monster train already stretches out to eighty miles in length, and the cry is, still they come."  We may well exclaim of it as Macbeth did of the apparitions of Banquo's issue "Will the line stretch out till the crack of doom?"
                                               
                                    Knoxville Register. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 1
           
Female Patriotism—A certain lady of this place, having heard that some of our soldiers in Arkansas have been compelled to stand guard in the snow and rain without blankets and thinly clad, resolved at once to convert her carpets into blankets.  This is true, unalloyed patriotism.  Who will follow her example?  Who can walk with a clear conscience on thick carpets, when they can be made so serviceable to the suffering soldier? 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 2

Wanted!—A Substitute!

            Over 45 years of age—a sound, able-bodied man, capable of performing military duty.  For such a one I will give one thousand dollars in cash.  Apply at Camp Ford, near Tyler, as soon as possible, to                                       F. G. Denman. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 2, c. 3

Arrivals and Departures of Mails,
City of Tyler.

            Marshall Mail Arrives Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 4 o'clock, P.M.  Departs Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 6 A.M.
           
Henderson Mail Arrives Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 10 P.M.  Departs Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 6 A.M.
           
Crockett Mail Arrives Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 10 P.M.  Departs Sunday, Wednesday and Friday, 3 A.M.
           
Kaufman Mail Arrives Sunday and Thursday, 6 P.M.  Departs Monday and Thursday 6 A.M.
           
Quitman Mail Arrives Monday, 6 P.M.  Departs Wednesday, 6 A.M.
           
Corsicana Mail Arrives Tuesday, 6 P.M.  Departs Wednesday, 6 A.M.
           
McKinney Mail Arrives Thursday, 6 P.M.  Departs Friday, 6 A.M.
           
The Mails will close at 5 o'clock P.M.
           
Office hours from 9 to 12 o'clock A.M., and from 2 to 5 o'clock.
                                               
                                    Geo. Yarbrough, P.M. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 3, c. 2

Obituary.

            Died, at Tyler, on the 28th inst., Annie Hutchings, daughter of John and Martha F. Winship, six years three months and nineteen days old.
           
She had a mind quite in advance of her years—remarkably sprightly and handsome—indeed she was attractive.  No admirer of intelligence in childhood could behold her, much less converse with her, without being forcibly struck with combined beauty, wit and amiableness.  But all these endowments, and the lavished love of her devoted parents, could not save her from the jaws of death.  She told her mother that she was going to her home in heaven, where she would see her little brother who died some months since.  A sad stroke is this—while the father is absent in the service of the country, to hear and mourn for his sweet Annie.  The mother is left to mourn alone; only one little lamb left out of a flock of three.
           
"I take these little lambs," said He,
           
"And lay them in my breast;
           
Protection they shall find in Me,
           
In Me be ever blest."
           
May heaven bless the stricken mother, and prepare the absent father for the sad intelligence.
           
Tyler, Texas, Oct. 29, 1862.                                                   J. W. F. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 3, c. 2

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by E. M. Carter, and estrayed before E. W. Stephens Esq., J. P. in Precinct No. 2.  A young sorrel horse colt, 2 years old last spring, star in his forehead, left hind foot white, some white on the end of his nose, about 12˝ hands high, no other marks or brands.  Appraised at $50.                                 R. W. Chapman, cl'k
Nov. 19th 1862.                                                                                       7-5t. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by B. F. Echols, and Estrayed before J. T. White J. P. in Precinct No. 3, one brown horse 10 or 12 years old, about 16 hands high, no marks or brands, and appraised at $125.  Oct. 14th 1862.                                                        n47-3t
           
Also taken up by Samuel W. Mayne, and estrayed before J. T. White, in Precinct No. 3, one small bay mare hip shotten in the right hip, six years old, some saddle marks, a small blaze or snip in the nose, 14 hands high, and appraised at $85.  oct. 14th 1862.
                                               
                                                            R. W. Chapman.
n47-3t.                                                                                                 Cl'k, S. C. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Administrators Notice.

            That on the 29th of September 1862, letters of administration were granted to B. H. White, on the estate of James L. Smith dec'd, this is therefore to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them as the law directs, and those indebted to said estate will please pay up as early as possible.              B. W. White.  Adm'r.
7-49-6t. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 3, c. 3

Administrator's Notice.

            That at the July Term 1862, of the Probate Court of Smith county, letters of Administration were granted to the undersigned on the estate of Elizabeth Jones dec'd.  This is therefore to notify all persons holding claims against said estate, to present these as the law directs, and those indebted to said estate will please settle up as soon as possible.
Nov. 12th, 1862.                                                               W. C. Pierce, Adm'r. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Estray Notice.

            Taken up by D. W. Smith, and estrayed before Stephen Reaves, J. P. in Beat No. 1 Smith Co., one black ox, with some white in his flanks and a white spot in his face resembling a heart, both horns droop, about 9 or 10 years old marked with a crop off of the right, and swallow fork and underbit in the left ear, branded X on the right hip, and appraised at $15.  Also a cow black and white pided about 5 or 6 years old, marked with a cross and split in each ear, branded J C on the right hip, appraised at $12.
                                               
                                    R. W. Chapman, cl'k
Nov. 1st 1862.                                                              pr G. H. Neill, Deputy cl'k.
                                               
                                    v7-n50 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            That at the September term of the Probate Court for Smith Co. letters of Administration were granted to W. J. Prickett on the estate of A. M. Prickett dec'd.  This is therefore to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them according to law, and those indebted to said estate will please pay up as early as possible.
                                               
                                    W. J. Prickett.
v7-n48-6t                                                                     Adm'r. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Notice.

            Stephen Reaves, Esq., is authorized to make settlement for the undersigned.  All interested please take notice.              Oct. 13th 1862.
                                               
                                    T. Smith,
v7-n47-8t                                                                     J. W. Brooks. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 13, 1862, p. 4, c. 1

Clothing Depot.

                                                                                    Jefferson, Texas, Oct. 21, 1862.
           
Having been appointed Chief purchasing agent of all Texas, North of the town of Crockett, for the purchase of Army Cloth, or Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Leather, Hides, and Wool.  I hereby issue notice to all parties having such articles for sale, to bring them in without delay for the use of the army.  The winter is rapidly approaching, and they will be required at the very earliest period.  I will make contracts for any amount of the above named articles the party always giving bond and good security for the contract made.  Any one holding authority from me or Maj. John B. Burton, and making contracts for any of the above named articles, will be carried out by me.
                                               
                                    A. U. Wright,
                                               
                                    Capt. and A. Q. M., C. S. A.
           
P.S.—I have the cash to pay on all contracts made as above stated.
                                               
                                    A. U. W.
                                               
                                    Capt. and A. Q. M., C. S. A.
                                               
                                                no50-3t.   

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter,
Is published every Thursday,
By W. F. Hamilton & Co.,
At $2,50 per Annum;
Six Months                $1,50
Single Copy                  25 cts.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 1

Letter from the West.

                                                                            Brownsville, Texas, March 18th, 1863.
Mr. Hamilton:
            Some seven or eight days ago, the Yankee transport "Honduras" anchored off the mouth of the Rio Grande, and amongst its precious cargo was to be found E. J. Davis, a renegade citizen of Texas, who at one time disgraced the Texas bench, but who now is commissioned a  Colonel in the abolition army; the notorious murderer and renegade, Montgomery, with a commission as Captain, was his confrere and fellow traveller.  They came to Matamoras, and for several days, were engaged in enlisting renegades into their service at that point.  Some few desertions from a certain class of our soldiery occurred, and owing to the assumed neutrality of Mexico we were forced to submit to it.  We met daily in the streets these hated minions of a Government which has been seeking for two years to accomplish our destruction, and were forced to stay the avenging hand; were forced to submit to witness the loathesome sight of those who claimed to be citizens of Texas, parading the grand Plazas of Matamoras in the Federal uniform.  Some 170 of these traitorous wretches had congregated there, and reveled in their supposed security.  A few days ago they left Matamoras, and proceeded to Bagdad, a Mexican town near the mouth of the river, and just opposite a point where a small Confederate force was stationed.  Here again they began a series of indignities which were very provoking.  Being still impressed with the idea of their safety, on account of the declared neutrality of the soil upon which they were camped, and emboldened by being under the guns of the "Honduras," their cowardly natures prompted them to peer at and insult our brave boys.  On the night of the 14th of March, Gen. Bee having gone to "Point Isabel," the boys thought the opportunity too good to be lost, and "made their arrangements according."  About 25 of them left Fort Brown, and by the time we reached the mouth the number was increased to 70.  We secured a sufficient number of boats to cross our entire force at once.  This we did at 4 o'clock a.m.  After reaching the town, our force was so disposed as to cut off the retreat of the renegades.  Learning that the Mexican Commandante had about 160 Mexican soldiers in the town, and not wishing to come, unnecessarily, in conflict with them, the commandante was notified of our purpose and requested to withdraw his soldiers from the danger of a collision.--Surrounding the house in which Col. Davis was said to be, he was ordered to surrender, and, I regret to say, he did so.  Had he made resistance, the world would have been well rid of a treacherous monster, and Texas of one of her most unworthy citizens.  The notorious Capt. Montgomery, who was a participant with "Jim Lane" in his Kansas outrages, was soon afterwards captured, with some five or six others.  Many of them eluded our search by hiding in Mexican houses, in steamboats, schooners, &c., but many of them, in attempting to escape, were unfortunate, and are now filling the capacious maws of Mexican "riotas" and Buzzards.  At 6 o'clock a.m. we had accomplished our work, and were returning to our boats for the purpose of recrossing the river into "Dixie land," when the Mexicans dashed out of their houses and delivered upon us a deafening but harmless volley.  Our commander immediately wheeled the boys into line, and ordering them to hold their fire, returned to the town and assured the Mexican authorities that we had no design to injure the people or insult the nationality of Mexico.  This seemed to quiet them, and we again resumed our march, when some 60 or 80 Mexicans again made a dash and fired upon us.  This time we had one of our boys wounded, and could stand it no longer.  We were ordered to fire, and upon the first fire these "heroic soldiers" fled in confusion.
            Having accomplished our purpose, we crossed the river and started for Fort Brown, where we arrived safely with one prisoner only, (Col. Davis) the others having escaped on the route.  Davis would have escaped also, but for the fact that when taken, his wife was with him, and made such a strong appeal to our commander to spare his life, that he agreed to do so, until delivered to Gen. Bee, and the boys faithfully adhered to this promise.  He was to-day delivered to Gen. Bee by some unknown parties.  The Mexican authorities regarding the crossing into their territory as a violation of her neutrality, demanded the return of Davis, which Gen. Bee, in order that we might not complicate our affairs at this time by a war with Mexico, and for other important commercial reasons, acceded to.  Davis may thank his stars that he had a wife, and that his wife happened to be the daughter of Forbes Britton, and happened to be present when he was captured--else his long, ungainly, foul carcass would now be dangling from a Rio Grande Maguite. [sic?]  Unless he leaves this section of the country immediately, his release will only be temporary.
            I am only reconciled to his being permitted to return to his infamy, by the hope that I shall soon meet him upon the battle-field, when the tears and entreaties of his wife, may not stay the hand of vengeance.  I wish I could mention the names of the brave boys who participated in the arrest and punishment of these vile traitors, but predential considerations restrain me.  They all acted like the genuine Texas soldier, and showed themselves capable of great achievements.  I counted 72 vessels, lying off the mouth.  To-day an English-man-of-war, came to anchorage.  The morning of the fight, a Yankee vessel left for New Orleans, for reinforcements, and we may have lively times here in a few days.  We will probably fight against odds, but I feel confident of the result.
            I have written you a long letter, but hope you and your readers may find something of interest in it.  To them, as to you, if it should prove uninteresting, I promise to do better next time.
                                                                    Yours, with the greatest confidence in your
                                                                    prudence and patriotism.
                                                                                    UNKNOWN.
            N.B.--"Escape" has a technical meaning out here.
                                                                                                    U.K.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 2
               
ARKANSAS POST PRISONERS.—The Little Rock True Democrat has the following concerning the Arkansas Post Prisoners.  We trust their treatment in prison has not been so bad as represented.  It now appears very certain that they have been exchanged, we shall probably hear from them soon:
               
The prison at Camp Douglas, Chicago, is a prefect pest house and slaughter pen.  our brave men immured in these dungeons die rapidly, and the infernal rascals who control the prison refused the patriots blankets, medicines or proper food.  It was a vast receptacle of mud and filth, surrounded or covered by stagnant water, and so unhealthy that the guards stationed there began to sicken and die.  The small pox broke out, and the would-be murderers became alarmed at the danger of disease spreading and grew afraid that in their attempts at the slow murder of patriots, they might spread disease among themselves.  Of late, we are told, they have made some efforts to clean up the prison and build a hospital.  Whenever we have found a list of deaths there, we have published the names of the Missourians, Arkansians and Texians.  The following we find among the names of those who died in the four days, from 24th to 27th February:
               
[We only give those from Texas.]
               
John W Renfrew, of 7th Texas; James Jackson, T C Towell and R C Edmondson, of the 10th Texas.  T Perry, D D Turner, W McMinn, Daniel Ketsell, W H Meigs, T R Tankerley, Allen Brian, W H Milton, Morton V Walker, W H Wilhams, Daniel J Tramel, B F Christopher, W S Coleman, and Robert T Work, of the 15th Texas.  K A McKnight of the 16th  Texas.  Creed Engledon, Joseph Swinney, W O Taylor, Joseph Cobb, A P Lowry, E B Burris, R G Granberry, Thos S Watkins, Martin M Pendegrass, W O Embry and Allen F Barber of the 17th Texas.  W A Stewart, A G Early, Thomas Elliott, T T Winn, W M Reynolds, Jos W Stetes, Joseph W Styles, N J Hyde, James B Ware and W H McDaniel, of the 18th Texas.  John Foster, of the sappers and miners.  Hugh March. 

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
            HORRIBLE DEATH OF CONFEDERATE PRISONERS.--The death by freezing of twelve Confederate prisoners at Camp Douglas, Ohio, has been noticed.  The 22th [sic] Illinois (Scotch) regiment, on guard there held a meeting and protested against the condition of the camp and barracks.  The Chicago Times has the following particulars of the death of the prisoners:
            Word was brought to the city last evening that during the night of Sunday, twelve of the Confederate prisoners confined in the pens at Camp Douglas were frozen to death.  It is asserted that on Monday morning they were found in the miserable handful of hay in their bunks frozen stiff, though to all appearances in the enjoyment of perfect health the day previous.  The barracks of Camp  Douglas are well known to be totally unfitted, during the prevalence of such weather as the present, for the use of anything, scarcely cattle.  Those in which these prisoners are confined are many of them destitute of stoves, the windows in some of them are broken out, and through the holes and the cracks in the apertures in roof the cold wind freely enters.
            It is said that the local officers at the camp, actuated by a humanity their superiors might pattern after with profit, have done all in their power to make the condition of the prisoners comfortable.--But there are those above them who have a terrible sin to answer for.  It were mercy that, after their capitulation, our cannon had been turned upon these prisoners and butchered them where they stood, rather than a far Southern clime, without any preparation being made for their comfort or protection, they should be transported hither, to meet with scarcely anything worthy the name of shelter, the fierce rigors of a Northern wind--to be murdered by neglect--to endure the tortures of a death by cold.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 1, c. 3
            Whenever, says the Rebel, you hear of a regiment, battalion, company, or squad, infantry or cavalry, destroying fences and other property of farmer citizens, you may safely set it down that the Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, Captain or Sergeant of the party is not fit for an officer, and a disgrace to the honorable profession of arms.
            The above contains a great truth and an important lesson, which it will be well to learn.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
J. P.  Douglas,        }    Editors.
H. V. Hamilton       }

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            An election takes place next Saturday for Brig. General in the 12th Brigade Texas State Troops.  Col. Geo. Yarbrough is announced as a candidate for the position.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 1

For the Benefit of the Graveyard.

            We are much gratified to learn that the young ladies of the East Texas Female College, assisted by others of the town and vicinity, have determined to give an entertainment on Friday evening, the 24th inst., consisting of tableaux, farces, plays, &c., for the benefit of our grave yard.  We need not appeal to the citizen for liberal patronage by saying that the necessity exists, because for years past the condition of the Tyler grave yard has been a blot upon the reputation of the town, a burning disgrace to its citizens, and a cause of derision and contempt to the passing stranger.  We have heretofore urged our fellow-citizens to remove this shame, but we have appealed in vain, and are now but too happy to see this move in the right direction.  We are requested to say that this entertainment is not gotten up in opposition to those which have preceded it, but alone for the purpose of accomplishing the good contemplated.  Let all attend--for God and civilization's sake let us make decent the place where sleep the loved and lost!

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            When everybody in the community is present to see for themselves, our opinion is of very little consequence; but we beg to say that the entertainment on last  Friday night eclipsed its predecessor, and was all that heart and eye and ear could wish.  Who could witness the scene of the "Flower Girl" without feeling that, indeed,

"A thing of beauty is a joy forever;"

or who behold the scene of the "Death of John Marshall" without feeling his heart bound with love for the brave, sorrow for his fall, and everlasting hatred for his slayers.  The "murder of a young lady by the abolitionists in Missouri," was well represented, and was an affecting scene.  Many beautiful scenes were presented, but such things must be seen to be appreciated.  Each interval was filled with sweetest music, and the whole entertainment was a perfect feast.  We dislike personality, but cannot refrain from having special reference to the rare musical abilities of Prof. Neel!
            The combined receipts of the two exhibitions are very handsome, and the money has been placed in the hands of a committee, consisting of five of our most worthy citizens, and will be properly disposed of.  Great good is being accomplished in this way; the people are responding nobly, and we sincerely hope that the managers and performers will not grow weary in a work so full of charity.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 3
            The Henderson Times claims to have information from good authority, that so soon as it was known that the Legislature, at the late called session, had determined to permit the distilleries to continue in operation, those interested in the business in the Southwest portion of Rusk county, immediately bought up all the corn for sale in that portion of the county at three dollars per bushel, and in consequence it is almost impossible for some poor families in that section to procure bread.--Of course, neighbor; who expected anything better?  Our legislators must have foreseen such results but what difference does it make who starves, so there is plenty of whiskey!  Let Rome burn--let Nero sing!

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 2, c. 3
            A letter in the Houston Telegraph, from Brownsville, of date the 28th of March, says that the clouds raised by the recent abduction of Davis and others from Mexican territory, and the more recent seizure of a Federal schooner in the anchorage off the mouth of the Rio Grande, which threatened so much to interrupt the friendly relations of the frontier, have gradually subsided, and given way to halcyon signs of peace and kindness.  Matamoras is said to be filled with goods, and causes are operating to give prices a downward tendency.  On the 28th there were nearly a hundred vessels at the anchorage awaiting their discharge.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 3, c. 1
            On Tuesday last we had the pleasure of a flying visit from Capt. W. S. Herndon, of Col. Bates' Battalion.  The Capt. was in excellent health, and says that everything at Velasco and in the coast region generally, is in a very satisfactory condition.  Capt. Herndon speaks in terms of the highest encomium of  Gen. Magruder; says he is every inch a General, and an incessant worker--has got no guns lying in the mud about Houston, or other points, but is preparing to make every edge cut when the time for action comes.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 3, c. 1

Administrator's Notice.

            Letters of Administration on the estate of John Wallis dec'd, having been granted to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Smith county, State of Texas, at the March term, 1863, hereof.  Notice is hereby given to all persons having claims against said estate to present the same within the time prescribed by law, or they will be forever debarred, and all persons indebted to said estate, are required to make immediate payment.
n19-6t                                                                                Jefferson H. Adair.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 3, c. 1

Administrator's Notice.

            Letters of Administration on the estate of D. T. Green dec'd, having been granted to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Smith county, State of Texas, at the march term 1863, thereof.  Notice is hereby given to all persons having claims against the said estate, to present the same within the time prescribed by law, or they will be forever barred, and all persons indebted to said estate are required to make immediate payment.
                                                                                            William Green, Adm'r.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 3, c. 2

Notice.

            That R. B. Long is authorized to redeem all the Change Bills issued by me, as therein specified in the face of the Bills, at any time when called on.                                R. W. Chapman,
            March 31st, 1863.                                                            Clerk C. C.  S. Co.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Circular.

                                                                                Head Quarters Clark's Regiment,                }
                                                                                Camp Near Pine Bluff, Ark., Feb. 23, '63.  }
To the people of Texas:
            You have always been noted for the readiness with which you give aid to your country when she needs assistance.  You have liberally and nobly contributed in the prosecution of the present war.  You are still willing to do so, I know, if further contributions are necessary.  Though the present indications are somewhat propitious, we should depend alone upon ourselves for peace.  Other nations may help us when it suits their interest to do so, and our enemy is not worthy of trust in any case.  There may yet be much hard fighting to do to end the war, and the commands now in the field having been depleted by death and other causes, need replenishing.  It devolves upon you to fill them up, and I therefore invite your attention to the following extract from a circular of the Adjutant and Inspector General, of date the 18th January, 1863:
            "Such persons as are liable to conscription will be allowed to join any particular company and regiment, requiring recruits, in which the officers "(enrolling or recruiting)" may be serving.  In like manner such persons as are within conscript ages, and who may come forward and offer themselves for service, will be allowed to volunteer, and will receive all the benefits which are secured by law to volunteers.  Recruits thus obtained, however, must, in all cases, enter companies already in the service, and cannot be organized into new companies or regiments."
            By the above extract you perceive that you still have the opportunity of volunteering.  Forced service is distasteful to you.  It would be an anomaly in the history of Texas.  I desire to replenish my regiment, and invite you to join me.  I would be pleased to receive you, and think you would find as pleasant service in my command and the Brigade to which it is attached, as any other.  Capt. L. B. Wood, Company "K," of Polk county, and Lt. J. D. G. Adrian, Company "C," of Smith county, are on their way to Texas, and are authorized to recruit for their respective companies.  Other recruiting officers will be dispatched to Texas and notice given.
                                                                                                              Edward Clark.
16-3t)                                                                                                    Col. Clark's Tex. Regt.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Notice.

            That applications will be made at the next regular term of the Probate Court to be held in Tyler, on the last Monday in March 1863, by Josiah D. Turner Adm'r. on the estate of J. C. Turner dec'd, for final settlement.  This is therefore to notify all persons interested to come forward, and show cause if any they have, why the same shall not be made.
            Febr. 28th, 1863.                                                                    R. W. Chapman, cl'k.
            n13-6t                                                                                        by G. H. Neill, d'p'ty.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Valuable Lands for Sale!!

            I offer for sale the well known Garden Valley Farm, situated 20 miles N W from Tyler.  The tract contains between 900 and 1,000 acres, about 100 in cultivation.  A part of the purchase price can be paid in cotton or other good property.  I have also other tracts of land, improved and unimproved--lying in the same neighborhood, which I will sell.  For terms and all other particulars, apply to the undersigned at Garden Valley.
            Dec. 25th 1862.
            n6-tf                                                                                            J. L. Davidson.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Dr. Jo. W. Davenport.                                        Dr. M. J. Lawrence.
Drs. Davenport & Lawrence,

Having formed a copartnership for the practice of their profession, in its various branches, can be found at their office on the North-West corner of the public square, except when professionally absent.  The services of both will be given in all cases when necessary without additional charge.                        8-15.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Notice.

            R. B. Long is authorized to transact business for me during my absence; also for the firm of Fleishl & Smith.
            Tyler, April 5th, 1863.                    n17-3t                                B. K. Smith.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Notice!

            Mail proposals will be received at this office for carrying the mail on route, No. 137, from Tyler to Quitman, the same to be transmitted to the contract bureau for its consideration.  Said contract to end the 30th June 1866.  The bidder must state amount per annum for which he proposes to carry it at, and enter into bond in the usual form if the bid should be accepted.  Tyler Post Office, March 27th, 1863.            
16-4t.                                                                                                    Geo. Yarbrough, P.M.
                                                                                                                    Tyler, Texas.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

The Graham Rangers.

            I want 20 more men, as I shall increase my company to one hundred and twenty.  My company will be attached to no regiment or brigade.  Many of the cavalry regiments have been dismounted, and those who like the cavalry service, and wish to remain as such, would do well to join my company.  Report to me, with good horses, and I will receive you.                                            Courtes B. Sutton,
            Tyler, April 8th, 1863.                                                    Capt of the Graham Rangers.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Strayed!

            From the undersigned near Jamestown, Smith Co., A sorrel Mare, branded M D on the left shoulder, no marks perceivable otherwise.  Any person informing me at Louisville, Denton Co., of her whereabouts, will be rewarded.
            Tyler, April 6th, 1862.                nt-4t                                Elbridge Bellino.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Executor's Notice.

            On the 30th day of march 1863, the Probate Court of Smith Co., Texas, granted letters testamentary with the  Will annexed to the undersigned, on the estate of Benjamin Darsey dec'd.  This is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted, will please make payment to                            John R. Darsey, or
            April 2d, 1863.                n17-6t                                Stephen Reaves, Ex'rs.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Deserted!

            From camp Ford, the Eastern camp of instruction for Conscripts.
            Jefferson Moseley--aged 36 years, 5 feet, 11 inches high, blue eyes, auburn hair, fair complexion, a native of  Alabama, by occupation a farmer, a resident of Upshur county, enrolled by  W. K. Heath, January 29th 1863.
            March 30th 1863.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Executor's Notice.

            I, Silas Alexander, executor on the estate of Mildria Adams dec'd, has filed his exhibit and account in estate for final settlement at the county Court, of Smith county, to be held at the Court house in Tyler, on the last Monday in April next 1863.  This is therefore to notify all persons interested therein, to appear at that time and show cause if any they have, why the same shall not be granted.
            Granted under my hand and seal of the county Court, at Tyler, April 3d 1863.        
            17-6t                                                                                R. W. Chapman, Cl'k
                                                                                                     Sam'l D. Gibbs, Deputy.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Attention!

            All persons who have heretofore been exempted, in the county of Smith, from enrollment for service, under either of the following heads, are ordered to report to me, at my office in Tyler, on or before the 20th [26th?] day of April next, for a fuller and more minute investigation of the grounds upon which exemptions in such cases were granted:
            Salt Makers, Wagon Makers, Shoe Makers, Blacksmiths, Tanners, Millers, Overseers on the plantations of Widows and Soldiers, Persons taking care of indigent families, together with all others, who have not yet reported, between the ages of 18 and 40 years.
            Those who are now standing exempt from either of the causes above mentioned, will be ordered into camps who refuse to obey this order, and treated as deserters.
            April 7th, 1863.                                                                J. M. Taylor, En'g Offi.

TYLER REPORTER,  April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Strayed.

            From the undersigned, about the 17th of March, from my house, known as the  Ratliff place, seven miles from Tyler, a bay Horse, black mane and tail, a white spot in his forehead, branded with the letters E M, hind feet white, the left hind foot has a scar on it.  Any one returning him will be liberally compensated.  Information concerning him thankfully received.                            Isabella Moore.
            8-18-3t.
            Henderson  Times, Texas Republican, Caddo Gazette, copy, and send bill to Isabella Moore, Tyler.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

For Sale!

            A light four horse Coach, nearly new and in good repair.  One sett of harness is wanting.  Apply at the Holman House, Tyler, Texas.            17-4t                                            Geo. W. Bates.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Strayed or Stolen!

            From the subscriber, six miles above Garden Valley, a gray Mare, 8 or 9 years old, branded on the shoulder "A."  One sorrel  Colt, 2 years old, and one iron-gray Colt, 2 years old.  It is possible that the mare has a young colt.  $50 will be given for their recovery.                J. H. Florence.
            Garden Valley, April 7th.                                                        8-18-3t

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 2

Executors Notice.

            Whereas, on the 24th day of  February 1863, letters testamentary were granted to the undersigned on the estate of J. C. Moore, dec'd, by the Probate Court of Smith county, this is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated, within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted to said estate will please make payment.  Tyler, Febr. 24th, 1863.
            n12-6t                                                                    John H. Moore,    }    
                                                                                           Stephen Reaves,  }  Exec't.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

J. H. Warren, M. D,
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler,  Texas.

            Offers his professional services to the public.
            Office East side of the public

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

M. A. Long                                            R. B. Hubbard.
Long & Hubbard,
Attorneys at Law,
Tyler, Texas

            Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial District, and in the U. S. and Federal  Courts at Tyler.
                                                                                                                    [v5n41-1y]

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law,

Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
            Tyler, Smith county, Texas, June 17, 1856.
            v1n46-tf

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

"Tyler House."
Tyler, Smith Co. Texas.
J. M. Williams, Proprietor

            Having taken the above named house which has just been vacated by its former well known lessee, (Rev. A. G. Irvine,) I respectfully solicit a call from its old patrons and friends, and the public generally.  Extensive repairs and additions will be immediately made to the Hotel buildings, and comfortable quarters insured to all who may stop with me.  Attached to the Hotel is a large Livery Stable, where horses will be well attended to; and at all times travellers can be forwarded to any point, on the shortest notice.
            Tyler, Dec'r 12, 1860.  1y

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

1000 Good Hides Wanted!

            We will tan Hides one half for the other, if delivered at our Tan Yard ten miles East of Tyler, on the Shreveport road running by Jamestown, (near Chappel Hill, Smith Co.,) or pay a liberal price in leather by the 15th March next.  Address E. E. Harris, Tyler, Texas.  January 15th 1863.
                                                                                                                    E. E. Harris.
                                                                                                                    M. R. Wood.
            N.B.--We use oak bark exclusively, and have employed an experienced tanner.
            n7-3m                                                                                               H. & W.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Notice.

            Strayed from my premises on the night of the 27th February, a sorrel mare Colt, 2 years old.  Any information of her, addressed to me, at Ogburn, Smith County, will be thankfully received.
            March 14th 1863.                                    n15                                    W. W. Ross.

TYLER REPORTER, April 16, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Tannery,
5 1-2 Miles South East of Tyler.
Thomas Meador & Co.,

            Will pay 20 cts. per. pound for good Hides, and will Tan all Hides entrusted to their care one half for the other.  They have Pleasant Crumplor, employed and will insure good leather.
            v8 n10 1y.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter,
Is published every Thursday,
By W. F. Hamilton & Co.,
At $2,50 per Annum;

Six months                $1,50
Single Copy                   25 cts.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
J. P. Douglas,      } Editors
H. V. Hamilton    }

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            Col. L. P. Butler, just returned from Shreveport, has our thanks for late papers.  Also Thos. Putty [sic?] for an extra sent by mail.  Such favors are appreciated just now.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            There will be a two days meeting at the Methodist Church in this place, embracing next Saturday and Sunday.  Ministerial aid is expected from abroad.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            Hon. F. M. Hays is this week announced as a candidate for re-election as Representative from this county.--Mr. Hays has been tried--has been found faithful, and his record speaks more loudly in his favor than any word of commendation written by us possibly could.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            Col. L. P. Butler is to-day formally announced as a candidate for Representative.  We again take occasion to say that Smith county could not place her interests in the hands of a better man.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            Mrs. B. L. Goodman has again shown her appreciation of the press by placing on our table some excellent Beets--the finest we have yet seen.  While Mrs. Goodman's beautiful flower yard causes her to be much loved by the young, her garden can be equally appreciated by those who have passed the heyday and flower-loving season of life.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            Bonner & Stuart have actually started their coach line from here to Marshall, and regular trips will be made from this time.  They have good coaches, good horses and good drivers, and everything in order.  Let the traveling public make a note of this.  The stage stand here is at the "Tyler House," where passengers will always find excellent accommodations.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            By reference to correspondence in another column, it will be seen that Col. R. K. Gaston has been called upon and has consented to become a candidate for Representative from Smith county at the August election.  Mr. Gaston is well known as one of our best citizens, and as a man well fitted for the position which his fellow-citizens have called upon him to occupy.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 1
            Mr. Benj. B. Beaird request us to say that he will leave here for the army next Monday, and that persons wishing to send letters or small packages to Speight's regiment, will have an opportunity be leaving them at Felton & Wiggins'  Drug Store.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

Minute Men.

            The idea has been suggested to us that, under present circumstances, it would be wise and safe to organize companies of Minute Men in every portion of the State, and especially in Eastern Texas.  Banks' late raid into Louisiana should be an all sufficient warning to us, and an unmistakable evidence of what our enemies will do whenever the opportunity is presented to them.  Gen. Smith suggests to the people of Texas the great necessity of being ready, and that pure patriot, Gen. McCulloch, seeing the danger to which his State has been and is still exposed, makes a most earnest and eloquent appeal to those at home, urging them to organize and hold themselves in readiness to meet the foe at a moment's notice.  some may be disposed to settle down with an idea of quiet security, now that Banks' army has left Red River and retreated from their late scene of action and immediate danger no longer stares us in the face; but should Vicksburg fall (God forbid it!) it will, in our humble judgment, be but a short time until we will find the enemy again at our doors.  We hope Vicksburg will stand; we believe Vicksburg will stand--but it may not; and whether it does or not, no injury can arise from preparation to meet emergencies.  Will some of our influential citizens take the lead in this matter?  In other counties companies are being organized--let us not be behind.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 2, c. 2
                                                                                                    Tyler, May 18th, 1863.
Col. Gaston:
            Dear Sir--Deeming it a matter of much importance that our county should be represented in the next Legislature by men of the right stamp and equal to the emergencies of the times, we, the undersigned citizens of Smith county, your friends and admirers, knowing of no one better qualified and fitted in every respect for the position, most respectfully request that you will consent to become a candidate for Representative in the lower branch of the next Legislature, and allow us to have your name announced as such.
Wm. Green                                            Jo. W. Davenport,                                Geo. Yarbrough
Theo. G. Jones                                       A. W. Ferguson,                                   Henry Wilfong,
Saml. D. Gibbs,                                      Tignal W. Jones,                                   H. H. Curl,
S. H. Boren,                                           Wm. Gimble,                                        B. L. Goodman,
D. H. Cade,                                            Saml Goodman sr.                                R. W. Chapman,
J. L. Neel,                                               L. P. Shackleford,                                C. M. Wiley,
J. W. Fields,                                            J. F. Boswell.
                                                                                                           Mt. Sylvan, Smith County, Texas,  }
                                                                                                                        May 23d, 1863.               }
    Messr. Wm. Green, Jo. W. Davenport, Geo. Yarbrough, B. L. Goodman, and others:
            Gentlemen--Your communication of the 18th inst., requesting me to become a candidate for Representative in the lower branch of the next Legislature, has been received and considered.  Coming from the source it does, it seems to leave but little choice of my own.  Were I to consult my own inclination and individual interest, I would certainly not be a candidate.  In fact, I had at one time come to the conclusion that I would never again enter the field of political strife and excitement.  But a great change has taken place in our country, and we are now in the midst of perilous times, engaged in a most cruel and bloody war with a great and powerful enemy, and all political issues and party feelings being laid aside, every true patriot should rally to the standard of his country, feeling that he is not his own, but that he belongs to his country, and that he should act in whatever capacity his fellow-citizens see proper to place him; and however feeble may be his efforts, yet he should do all in his power to aid in the achievement of the great end for which we are all striving--the independence of our country.  With this view of the subject, I have concluded to consent to your request, fearing at the same time you have overestimated my capacity and ability.  But however that may be, should I be elected, I will strive to do all in my power to promote the best interest of our county and the State at large.
            Accept, gentlemen, my grateful acknowledgement for the kind expression of your confidence.
                                                                                                            Your ob't serv't,
                                                                                                                    R. K. Gaston.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 3

Eastern Texas Baptist Convention.

            The annual meeting of the  E. Texas Baptist Convention, will be held with the Baptist Church in Tyler, commencing Friday before [illegible] in June.  Delegates will report themselves to the Drug Store of Felton and Wiggins.
            Tyler, May 19th, 1863.
                        T. W. Jones              }
                        J. T. Hand                 }
                        Nat. G. Smith            }  Committee
                        W. S. Walker            }
                        W. B. Featherston,    }
        n25-6t

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 3, c. 3

New Steam Mill in Tyler.

            [illegible] Ira Ellis.  [note:  trying to get clearer copy]

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

New Goods.

            The undersigned will receive, about the 5th of May, at Yarbrough's new brick store, an excellent assortment of French and English Calicos, Bleached and Brown Domestics, Ginghams, Swiss Muslins, Paper and Envelopes, Soda, Black Pepper, Powder, Lead and Caps, Cups and Saucers, Plates, Fine Combs, &c.  We have now in store a lot of Gents' Summer Clothing, and a good lot of Tobacco, to which we invite the attention of those in need of such articles.                    Chapman &  Dorough.
            Tyler, April 23d, 1863.                            [8-20-6t]

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Administrator's Notice.

            Letters of Administration on the estate of John Wallis dec'd, having been granted to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Smith county, State of Texas, at the March term, 1863, thereof.  Notice is hereby given to all persons having claims against said estate to present the same within the time prescribed by law, or they will be forever debarred, and all persons indebted to said estate are required to make immediate payment.
            n19-6t                                                                                        Jefferson H. Adair.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 1

Valuable Lands for Sale!!

            I offer for sale the well known Garden Valley Farm, situated 20 miles N. W. from  Tyler.  The tract contains between 900 and 1,000 acres, about 100 in cultivation.  A part of the purchase price can be paid in cotton or other good property.  I have also other tracts of land, improved and unimproved--lying in the same neighborhood, which I will sell.  For terms, and all other particulars, apply to the undersigned at Garden Valley.
            Dec. 25th 1862.
            n6-tf                                                                                            J. L. Davidson.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

J. H. Warren, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
Tyler, Texas.

            Offers his professional services to the public.
            Office East side of the public

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3 

M. A. Long                        R. B. Hubbard.
Long & Hubbard,
Attorneys at Law,
Tyler, Texas.

Will practice in the Courts of the 9th Judicial  District, and in the U. S. and Federal Courts at Tyler.
                                                                                                                            [v5n41-1y]

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Tignal W. Jones,
Attorney at Law

Will attend faithfully and promptly to all business entrusted to his care.
            Tyler, Smith county, Texas, June 17, 1856.
            v1n46-tf

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

"Tyler House."
Tyler, Smith Co. Texas.
J. M. Williams, Proprietor

            Having taken the above named house which has just been vacated by its former well known lessee, (Rev. A. G. Irvine,) I respectfully solicit a call from its old patrons and friends, and the public generally.  Extensive repairs and additions will be immediately made to the Hotel buildings, and comfortable quarters insured to all who may stop with me.  Attached to the Hotel is a large Livery Stable, where horses will be well attended to; and at all times travellers can be forwarded to any point, on the shortest notice.
        Tyler, Dec'r 12, 1860.  1y

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Dr. Jo.  W. Davenport.                        Dr. M. J. Lawrence.
Drs. Davenport & Lawrence,

Having formed a copartnership for the practice of their profession, in its various branches, can be found at their office on the North-West corner of the public square, except when professionally absent.  The services of both will be given in all cases when necessary without additional charge.                        8-15.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Tannery,
5 1-2 Miles South East of Tyler.
Thomas Meador & Co.,

            Will pay 20 cts. per. pound for good Hides, and will Tan all Hides entrusted to their care one half for the other.  They have Pleasant Crumplor, employed and will insure good leather.
            v8 n10 1y.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Notice.

            R. B. Long is authorized to transact business for me during my absence; also for the firm of Fleishl & Smith.
            Tyler, April 5th, 1863.                    n17-3t                                B. K. Smith.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Administrator's Notice.

            At the March term 1863, of the Probate Court of Smith county, letters of Administration was granted to the undersigned on the estate of Wm. Wren and J. C. Wren dec'd.  Any person holding claims against either of said estates will present the same duly authenticated, within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted, will please make payment.  April 17th, 1863.
            n20-6t                                                                                        John G. Coleman, Adm'r.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3

Administrator's Notice.

            Letters of Administration on the estate of D. T. Green dec'd, having been granted to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Smith county, State of Texas, at the march term 1863, thereof.  Notice is hereby given to all persons having claims against the said estate, to present the same within the time prescribed by law, or they will be forever barred, and all persons indebted to said estate are required to make immediate payment.
            n19-6t.                                                                                        William Green, Adm'r.

TYLER REPORTER, May 28, 1863, p. 4, c. 3
            Broke Out of the lot at Tyler, one medium size, iron grey, 3 year old MULE.  Any information concerning the mule will be thankfully received, or I will give a liberal reward for the mule, delivered to the Post-Quartermaster here.
            8-28-3t.                                                                                        John W. Daniel.

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 2, c. 2
           
The "spring fights" have opened.  Two of our young friends (what used to be called boys in ancient times!) had a set-to on Monday night, in which one was smartly pelted with a stick, and the other received a slight pistol shot in the arm.—"Children should not be allowed to handle edged tools." 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
           
This community sympathises deeply with Dr. Jo. W. Davenport and family on account of the loss of their residence in this place by fire, on Monday night last.   The fire broke out, we understand, in one of the back rooms, and was occasioned by a negro dropping a candle into some lint cotton.—Quick as though the flames spread, and, on account of high wind, all efforts to check them were unavailing.  The building was entirely destroyed, together with nearly all the furniture, clothing, &c.  Dr. Davenport lost, also, a large quantity of medicines, and most of his books, papers, &c.  Such a loss cannot be repaired now.   Some other buildings took fire about town during the burning, but were promptly extinguished. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
           
See order in today's paper from Gen. E. Kirby Smith, in accordance with a resolution of Congress, setting apart the 8th day of April prox. as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer.  We are informed by Ministers that there will be services in some one of the churches in town, and a general attendance is desired.  In times of trouble we can not do better than throw ourselves upon that arm in which all power lies. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 2, c. 3
           
We are informed that thirteen out of fifteen Federal prisoners who escaped from Camp Ford a few nights since, have been recaptured, and are safely in confinement again. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Hymeneal.

            "Here Love his golden shafts employes, here lights
           
His constant lamp, andwaves his purple wings,
           
Reigns here and revels."
           
It is ever a pleasure to the weary soldier, after long months of absence and arduous service, to come back to the home of his youth, to receive the plaudits of his countrymen, the smiles of friends, and the embraces of loved ones; but how magnified and complete must be his joy when he returns to realize the fulfillment of a long cherished dream, to find a plighted faith well kept, and to meet the consummation of his great life hope.  So thought we a few days ago, when our friend and old companion Capt. James P. Douglas arrived from east of the Mississippi—so thought we while we witnessed, on Thursday evening last, at the residence of Mr. B. H. White, the ceremonies which paired at Hymen's festive altar, the Captain's fate with that of the beautiful and accomplished Miss Sallie S. White.  We need not consume time here in giving a minute account of the occasion; be it sufficient to say that everything necessary had been done to render all present comfortable; and while no "flying feet marked the passing of the hours," sweet music lent its magic influence to the scene, and many a heart beat high with hope and happiness on that night—but none so full perhaps, as those of the thrice happy pair.  May life to them be ever full of gladness, and each unfolding year show them cause to bless the hour that joined their hearts and hands in this holiest earthly union. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 3, c. 3
                                               
                        Head Quarters, Trans-Miss. Dept.    }
                                               
                        Shreveport, La., March 18th, 1864.   }
General Orders            }
           
No. 8.              }
           
The Congress of the Confederate States having appointed the 8th day of April as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer,
           
Military exercises will be suspended, and a strict observance of the day is enjoined upon all troops serving in the department.
           
One the eve of a campaign in which our resources will be taxed to the utmost, and upon which the destinies of our people depend, we should humble ourselves before the Lord of hosts, who giveth not the battle to the strong, but upholdeth the cause of the just.
           
The Lieutenant-General Commanding, therefore, feels it his duty to invite the people of this Department to join with the troops in invoking the blessings of peace and security upon our beloved country.
                                               
                        By command of
                                               
                        Lieut. Gen. E. Kirby Smith,
                                               
                                    S. S. Anderson,
n-14-2w                                                                                   Assistant Adjutant General. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Fifty Dollars Reward.

            Will be paid for the apprehension of the negro man ELISHA, the property of Maj. John A. Buckner, of La.  The said negro is about forty years old, slender made, of thin visage, complexion black.  My P. Office is Seven Leagues, Smith Co., Texas.
           
March 15th, 1864            13-3t                                        J. S. O. Brooks. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Strayed.

            An old moon blind mare mule, of bay color, belonging to C. S. Laboratory, Tyler, Tex.                                                                                            W. P. Johnston
                                               
                                                            P. A. C. S. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration on the estate of Alexander Copeland, dec'd, having been granted to the undersigned, by the Probate Court of Smith county, at the February term 1864, of said Court.  This is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate, to present them in accordance with law, and those indebted will make immediate payment.
                                               
                                    J. T. Copeland,            } Admr's
                                               
                                    J. R. Copeland             }                                                                                               

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

                                                                                    Office, C. S. Labaratory, [sic]      }
                                               
                                                Tyler, Texas,                    }
           
It is proposed to dry Vegitables [sic] for Hospital use, that the sick, next winter may receive the benefit.  Persons planting their gardens, would do well to put in a larger crop than they require for home use.  A liberal price will be paid for all kinds of Vegitables [sic].  Proposals are invited.
                                               
                                    W. R. Johnston, Surg.
n11                                                      P.  A. C. S. in charge C. S. Laboratory. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration having been granted to me on the Estate of Harrison Ebberhart, dec'd, by the Probate Court of Smith county this day, this is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted will please settle with
                                               
                                    Geo. Yarbrough.
11-6t]  Tyler, March 2d, 64                                                   Admr. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 1

Notice.

            The Travelling community are notified that the Marshall Stage stops at the Holman House, and the office of the same is kept there.
           
March 21st, 1864.                                                       John A. Sanford.
n13-2w                                                                                                Proprietor & Agent. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 2

Good News!

            Having secured the services of a No. 1 Tanner, I desire to purchase 2,000 good Hides, and will pay for dry hides 12 cts. per pound, or 6 cts. for green Hides, in Leather next fall, at 35 cts. per pound for sold Leather, and upper in proportion.  I will also Tan on shares, one half for the other.  No pains will be spared to give satisfaction.  For further information, see J. M. McFarland, at Tyler, Texas, or the undersigned, at his Mill 3 miles North East of Starrville, Smith Co., Texas.
           
March 9th, 1864.
n11-4w                                                                                    R. T. McFarland. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 2

                                                                        Hd.Qrs, Bureau of Conscription,        }
                                               
                                    Department Trans-Miss.         }
                                               
                        Marshall, Texas, March 10th, 1864.   }

$300 Reward.

            The following Soldiers having deserted from their camp near this place last night, a reward of $30 for each of them will be paid for their arrest and delivery at these Head Quarters viz:  . . .
           
J. B. Tunnell, Co. F, 12th Texas Cavl'y, Smith County.
           
All military officers are required and civil officers requested, to aid in the apprehension and delivery of these deserters.
                                               
                                    By command of
                                               
                                    Brig. Genl. Greer,
           
W. Steadman,
           
n12-3t              A. A. General. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 2

Notice.

            A Steam Saw and Grist Mill for sale, 26 horse power, enquire of Ira Ellis at Tyler.
           
March 18th, 1864.                  
           
n13-3t                                                                                      Ira Ellis. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 2

Recruits Wanted.

            Four Cavalry Companies of my Regiment having been transferred to another command, by order of Lt. General E. Kirby Smith, I am authorized by Maj. Gen. Magruder to replace said companies by recruiting four Infantry Companies.  I am also authorized to raise three Companies of Cavalry, to be stationed at the mouth of the Brazos river, for duty under my command.  Recruits received in companies or squads, and the usual bounty paid.
                                               
                                                J. Bates,
n13-4t                                                                                      Col. 13th T. V. Inf't. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 3

Holman House.

            The undersigned having leased the "Holman House"—respectfully solicits patronage of the traveling public.  Every accommodation shall be furnished, to render the guest comfortable.  The Table shall be supplied with every variety the country contains.  Also a large Stable connected with the House, where Horses shall be properly attended to.
           
Tyler, Sept. 9th, 1863.                                                            John A. Sanford.
           
P. S.—Especially do I ask the Citizens of Smith County, to send in all the surplus they have.  Such as Hams, Bacon, Lard, Turkeys, Chickens, Eggs, Butter, Vegetables &c. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 3

Confiscated Lands for Sale
in the Counties of

Dallas, Ellis, Navarro, Limestone, Freestone, Kaufman, Smith, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur and Hunt
           
Schedule of all the tracts of land in the above named counties, which have been confiscated, will be left in the Clerk's Office of each county for inspection by those wishing to purchase, and in all cases in which a satisfactory minimum price is bid for a tract, I will obtain a decree to offer such tract or tracts for sale to the highest bidder, for cash at the Court House door of the County, on the regular sale day in each month, the biddings to open at the minimum price so bid.  Until the war is over and our citizens shall return from the army, said lands will only be sold in this manner, and bids are invited.  This course, it is hoped, may have effect of accommodating such of our citizens at home as need these lands for use, and at the same time allow our brave soldiers to purchase such tracts as they need, and prevent the lands passing into the hand of speculators at nominal price.
                                               
                        M. A. Long, Receiver C. States
Tyler, June 20, 1863.—33. 

TYLER REPORTER, March 31, 1864, p. 4, c. 3

Soap and Vinegar.

            Hard Soap, and good apple or wine Vinegar, wanted at the Commissary; for which a liberal price will be paid.                                                Jno. Q. St. Clair,
                                               
                                                Capt. & A. C. S. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 1

The Tyler Reporter,
is Published Every Thursday
By W. F. Hamilton & Co.

            Terms—In State Warrants or New issue of Confederate Notes, for six months, $25.  Three months $15.  The old currency received at the standard of discount.
           
Persons who prefer paying in specie can have it at the rate of $4 per annum. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            Whereas Wm. Green has filed his account current for final settlement at the next term of the Hon. Probate Court, holden [sic] at the town of Tyler, on the last Monday in October, 1864.  This is therefore to notify all persons interested in the estate of D. T. Green dec'd, to appear at that time and show cause if any they have, why said final account should not be approved and distribution made.
n11-6t                                                                                      F. A. Godley,
                                               
                                                cl'k, c. c't, Smith co. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 1

Notice for Final Settlement.

            Whereas, Silas Alexander Executor to the Last Will and Testament of John D. Alexander Dec'd, having filed in my office his account for final settlement, and partition of the same.  This is to notify all persons interested in said Estate, to appear at the Oct. Term 1864, of the Probate Court of Smith county, at the Courthouse thereof, to show cause, if any, why said account should not be approved and partition granted.
                                               
                                                F. A. Godly,
                                               
                                                Cl'k. C. C. S. co. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration having been granted to the undersigned on the estate of Geo. Price dec'd, on the last Monday in Sept. 1864, by the County Court of Smith county.  This is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted to said estate will please make payment.
                                               
                                    Tyler, Oct. 31st, 1864.
n15-6t                                                                          J. T. White, Adm'r. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 1

Administrators Notice.

            On the 31st day of October, 1864, letters of administration was granted to the undersigned, on the estate of Wm. W. Price, dec'd, by the Probate Court of Smith county.  This is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present them duly authenticated, within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted will make payment to
Tyler, Oct. 31st 1864.                                                               Nancy W. Price,
n45-6t                                                                                      Adm'x. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 1, c. 3
           
How the Starving Plan Has Succeeded.—Those of Stoneman's raiders who got back to Sherman's army, brought the following report:
           
All agree in representing the Confederacy to be agriculturally in a most flourishing condition.  The whole land is fat with corn and plenteous with pork while negroes are huddled in only less abundance than mules and horses.  The region which they penetrated is level and exceedingly fertile; the women are described as no longer the gaunt, sallow, whining creatures which we see in Northern Georgia, but bitterly defiant and hostile towards the Yankees; but the men are absolutely swept out of the country.  The vast tracts, stretching mile after mile, unbroken by the roadside, formerly devoted to cotton, now flourish with corn—the government allows only a quarter of an acre of cotton per hand.  Georgia alone has enough corn in cultivation to subsist the whole rebel army for a year.  They found considerable old corn and plenty of pork stored in cellars in bulk.  At Madison they destroyed 500 sacks of genuine Rio coffee and large quantities of rebel shoes made of stout cotton cloth.
           
In short, the rebels have of imported luxuries but little to spare; but of the substantial the material for sturdy muscle and the basis of hard fighting they have an abundance

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
           
The New Texas Primary Speller.—The second edition of this popular little school book is now out.  It embraces 40 pages of spelling lessons, including the alphabet in large letters, and is designed expressly for beginners and the younger class in the schools.  Price single copies 25c., by the dozen $2.40, by the 100 $18.75.  Sent by mail post paid at these prices.  Address James Burke, Houston, or the publishers.
                                               
                                                E. H. Cushing & co.
           
We have been favored by the publishers with a copy of the above little work, and have no hesitation in pronouncing it the best thing of the kind we have seen, both as regards its compilation and the manner of its mechanical execution. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
           
We are glad to see our friend, Col. R. B. Hubbard, at home again, but regret the sad bereavements, in the loss of his father and child, which occasions his present visit.  The Col. is in good health, and speaks encouragingly of our cause and the condition of our armies. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
           
We would like to be informed what has become of that tremendous patrol appointed by the County Court some time ago, for the purpose of keeping in proper bounds the "free persons of African descent" among us.  We understand that a double, perhaps a triple, patrol had been appointed, but they are certainly doing but little work, or are very silent about it.  One thing we call special attention to:  We believe negroes have as much right to go to heaven as anybody else, provided they go in the right way; but we are emphatically opposed to the policy of allowing them to occupy churches and do their own preaching in their own way.  In fact, we are not greatly in favor of assembling them in congregations under any circumstances. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
           
We are in receipt of the "Confederate News," published at Jefferson, Texas, and edited by J. A. Carpenter, the paper having been recently revived, after a long suspension.
           
The "San Antonio Herald" is also again on our table, after a long absence.  We wish both ample success, to long as they battle manfully and faithfully for proper and truthful doctrines, including as a fundamental principle the separate and distinct nationality and independence of the Southern Confederacy, under any and all circumstances. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 1
           
The Hon. Louis T. Wigfall addressed the people here on Tuesday last.  Many citizens and soldiers were present to hear him, and as he has spoken in many portions of the State within the past few months, and as most of the papers in the State, including the Reporter, have published synopses of his views, we doubt the necessity now of attempting even a short and, as it must necessarily be, imperfect report of his speech.  However, the topics discussed by him are so important, so vitally interesting to the whole people, that we cannot refrain from offering those who have not had the good fortune to hear him at least a glance at them.
           
Almost his entire address was directed to a review of the actions of Congress. . . .
           
In conclusion, Mr. Wigfall appealed to the patriotism of the people, asking the ladies especially to do their high and holy duty. . . . 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 2, c. 2-3

From Austin.

                                                                                    Rep. Hall, Austin, Texas.  }
                                               
                                                Oct. 28th, 1864.  }
           
Dear Van:--In my last, I stated that probably the legislature would appropriate the Fabries [sic—Fabrics] of the Penitentiary for the support of the families of soldiers from Texas, in the army or active service of the Confederate States, or of the State of Texas, as also for those who have died or been killed in the service of the country.  This still seems to be the favorite plan of many members, but the plan has not yet ripened into maturity, though the proper committee is preparing a Bill which will probably be presented to the House for its consideration to-day.
           
The advantages which are claimed by the advocates of this measure are that an appropriation from this institution is from a common fund, and bears equally upon all the property of the State; that it will ensure to them a permanent benefit because the cloth is an article of prime necessity and is not subject to fluctuations on account of depreciation of currency.
           
2ndly.  by reason of the passage of such an act we can greatly curtail the issue of Treasury Warrants, and thereby save an indebtedness against the State, which will ultimately have to be liquidated in specie.
           
3rdly.  It is contended that by an equitable distribution of the Penitentiary Fabries [sic—Fabrics], as above contemplated, a vastly greater quantity of those Fabries [sic-Fabrics] will reach the soldiery than through the present system of sale to and distribution by agents of the Confederate Government.
           
The amount of cloth which can be distributed from the Penitentiary, it is hoped, will be sufficient to furnish adequate means for the purposes herein contemplated, but in the event there should be a deficiency in any county after the distribution of the cloth, it is proposed to extend to the county Courts the authority to levy and have collected an advalorum Tax in specie, or other funds, or in produce at their discretion, to make up the deficiency.  This is subject to some objection on the score of inequality; but it is thought to be the most practicable under the circumstances.  This subject is very much embarrassed by reason of the different conditions in the different localities of the State.  One county calls for a specie tax, another for a produce tax, and another for a tax in Treasury Warrants; hence the difficulties with which we have to contend, and hence the necessity of allowing large discretion to county Courts in order to make our action general.  The Bill above referred to, has just been reported from the committee on Finance, and I am of opinion it will pass the House, retaining its principal features.  It has just been ordered to be printed, and as soon as a printed copy can be procured I will forward you one.  As to the general financial policy, I am not able to determine as yet, there seems to be so much diversity of opinion in relation to the matter.  The most probably plan in my opinion is to continue to receive in payment of the advalorum tax, Confederate money, and endeavor to bolster up the State issue by a tax on occupations, payable in Treasury Warrants.  But as this is mere matter of conjecture I will leave off further comments upon this subject until my next, when I hope to have facts instead of conjecture.
           
The sad intelligence of the death of the Hon. G. M. Brazier, member from Houston co., was announced to the House this morning by his colleague, Hon. Mr. Wooters, whereupon the House adopted suitable resolutions, expressing their deep regret at the loss of this useful member, and extending their condolence to the family of the deceased, and stood adjourned until to-morrow at 6 o'clock.  More Anon.
                                               
                        Very Respectfully,
                                               
                                    F. M. Hays.
[We are in possession of the bill above referred to as printed, but have not room for it this week.—ED.] 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Obituaries.

            Departed this life, on the 11th Oct., Mr. R. B. Hubbard Sr., aged 64 years, and a citizen of Smith county, Texas.
           
This useful citizen and devoted christian, died in the full triumphs of Faith.  His painful illness, was borne with calm resignation to the will of God, and his death was an eloquent tribute to the truth of the Christian Religion.
           
Departed this life, on 24th Sept., Hattie, (infant daughter of Col. R. B. Hubbard Jun., and Eliza R. Hubbard,) aged 3 years.
           
"Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of Heaven.."
                                               
                                                            *   

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Superior Ivory Black
Writing Fluid.
For Sale at
Reporter Office.
Person wishing to purchase, must furnish bottles. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Notice to Confederate Tax Payers.

            You are hereby notified that I will attend at the following places to collect the Confederate Tax for the year 1864, viz:
           
At Garden Valley, Beat No. 10 on the 5th & 6th Dec. next.
           
At Flora, Beat No. 3, on the 7th and 8th Dec. next.
           
At Steenes Saline, Beat No. 3, on the 9th and 10th Dec.
           
At McClungs, Beat No. 8, on the 12th and 13th of Dec.
           
At Starrville, Beat No. 4, on the 14th and 15th Dec.
           
At Jamestown, Beat No. 5, 16th and 17th Dec.
           
At Canton, Beat No. 6, 19th and 20th Dec.
           
At White House, Beat No. 7, on the 21st and 22d Dec.
           
At Mt. Vernon, Beat No. 2, 23d and 24th Dec.
           
At Tyler, Beat No. 1, on the 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th, and 31st Dec.
           
It will be expected that all will attend some one of the above appointments as no Taxes can be received in any thing but the new issue or specie, after the 31st December.
           
All persons failing to meet me, will be liable to double tax on occupation and sales, and 10 per cent. additional to other taxes.
           
Nov. 4th, 1864.                                                                     T. W. Bell,
                                               
                                                Dist. Collector. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Strayed.

            From the undersigned about 16th of Sept., a sorrell horse, 9 years old, a blaze in the face, both hind feet and one four [sic] foot white, a small white spot under his belly just behind the firth, branded on the shoulder W P.  A liberal reward will be paid to any one informing or delivering him to me, at my house three miles below Belzora on the Sabine River.                                        Tyler, Nov. 4th 1864
n46-3t                                                                          David Hill. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Lost.

            Or mislaid Certificate, for $300, for seven per cent. bond, issued by H. J. G. Battle, Depositary at Shreveport, La., on 1st day of June, 1863, No. 24, to E. G. Baxter.  If not found I will apply for a duplicate.
                                               
                        Tyler, Oct. 31st, 1864.
                                               
                                    Julia H. Baxter Exec't.
n46-3t                                                                                      of E. G. Baxter dec'd. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Ladies of Eastern Texas,

            The Clothing Department will exchange Calico, Ginghams, bleached and brown Domestics, nine yards for three garments, shirts, pants and drawers.
           
Four yards for woolen pants, and five and one half yards for woolen round-abouts, lined.  Exchange coat buttons, spool thread and needles for Socks, and garments of colored cloth, except drawers.  I will be in Tyler, about the middle of Dec.  I will inform the people of the time hereafter.
           
Oct. 31st, 1864.                                           A. L. Hay.
n45-3t                                                                          Agent Clothing Department. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 3, c. 3

Sequestrated Property
For Sale.

            Pursuant to the several decrees of the Hon. District Court of the Confederate States for the Western District of Texas, I will offer for sale to the highest bidder

250,000 Acres of Land!!

sequestrated as the property of alien enemies, for Confederate Treasury Notes or Bonds, at the following times and places, to-wit: . . .        
           
Fifty Thousand Acres at Tyler, Smith County, on Monday, the 12th of December, '64. . . .      
           
The lands are situated in Parker, Jack, Young, Throckmorton, Baylor, Knox and Haskell Counties, on the upper Brazos and Trinity Rivers and tributaries.  They are well selected, and are in a good stock and small grain country, with plenty of water and timber, and are in surveys from 320 to 2200 acres.
           
The old issue will be received at the legal value.  The new issue and interest bearing notes will be taken at their face value, as also bonds.  These lands will be specially described by plots and maps on the days of sale.
           
The receiver will give his receipt for the purchase money, containing a description of the land sold.—He will report the sale to the Court at the January term, '65.  Should the sales be confirmed by the Court, he will immediately pass deeds of conveyance to purchasers and take up his receipt.
           
All persons who purchased at his last sales, are notified that their deeds are ready, and are in the hands of Thos. U. Toler & G. W. Brooks, Dis. Dep. Marshal at Weatherford, Parker county, with whom they will leave his receipt upon getting their deeds.
                                               
                                                J. C. Rushing,
n45-4t.                                                                                                 C. S. Receiver. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 4, c. 1-2

A List of Exempt and Detailed Conscripts,
of Smith County. 

Detailed Farmers.

Jas. A. Hardin, Jamestown.
A. A. Holt, near Jamestown.
W. S. N. Biscoe, 15 miles S. W. of Tyler.
W. R. Ross, 12 miles E. of Tyler.
G. W. King, near Starrville.
J. M. Wiggins, 10 miles N. of Tyler.
W. B. McLeroy, 10 miles S. E. of Tyler.
A. J. Wallace, near Starrville.
J. M. Berry, Steenes Saline.
John McLain, 10 miles E. of Tyler.
S. S. Sobdell, near Steenes Saline.
J. B. Hereford.
John Gordon, near Steenes Saline.
Virginia Block, near Starrville.
Wm.  T. King, near Starrville.
J. J. Powell, 8 miles N. of Tyler.
Thos. D. Frazier, Steenes Saline.
George S. Cockrell, 23 miles N. W. of Tyler.
J. S. Thomas, near Starrville.
D. Loftin, 16 miles S. of Tyler.
W. W. Butler, near Starrville.
W. W. Bunkley, 20 miles N. W. of Tyler.
J. G. James, Canton.

Detailed Salt Makers.

W. S. Butts, Steenes Saline.
Sam P. Lemay, Steenes Saline.
J. J. Dudley, Steenes Saline.
W. A. Ray, Steenes Saline.
J. B. Morris, Steenes Saline.
W. D. Walker, Steenes Saline.
Sam Prather, Steenes Saline.
J. S. O. Brooks, Neches Saline, revoked.

Detailed Physicians.

E. H. Vermillian, Mt. Vernon.

Detailed Millers.

Green B. Epperson, 5 miles E. of Tyler.
Payton Downey, 12 miles N. E. of Tyler.
Wm. Buckholdtz, 16 miles N. of Tyler.
J. N. McKindley, 8 miles S. of Tyler.
C. B. Carter, Mill at Tyler.
W. W. Wilson, 28 miles N. W. of Tyler.
J. T. White, 13 miles N. W. of Tyler.
F. S. Lowry, Starrville.

Detailed Blacksmiths.

C. P. Yarbrough, Flora
John Flore, Canton.
H. C. Langford, Canton.
F. Y. Smith, 5 miles S. W. of Tyler.

Detailed Tanners.

R. R. Roddy, Mt. Vernon.
E. O. Harris, 10 miles East Tyler.
H. F. Shuford, 12 miles N. E. of Tyler.

Detailed Shoemakers.

J. H. Swain, near Garden Valley.
Mathias Lehnes, Tyler.
C. W. Vance, near Starrville.

Detailed Wagon-makers.

M. C. Williamson, near Starrville.
F. W. Stephens, Mt. Vernon.
S. W. Lisenbee, Machinest [sic]

Schedule of Prices.

            Wheat, per bushel, $5.00; Corn, per bushel, $2.50; Barley, Oats and Rye, per bushel, 2.50; Peas, per bushel 3.00; Beans, 5.00; Bacon, per lb., 75c; Pork, 30c; Pork mess, 75c; Hogs, gross, 22c; Lard, 75c; 4 yrs old beef cattle, 60.00; Beef per lb., 15c; Mutton per head, 10.00; Mutton per lb., 20c; Tallow, 50c; Potatoes, 2.00; Vinegar per gal., 4.00; Fodder per hundred, 1.50; Hay, 2,50; Marino wool, unwashed, 2.00; American wool unwashed, 1.20; Mexican wool, 60c; Cotton, 25c; Artillery horses No. 1, 800.00; No. 2, 750.00; Mules, No. 1, 700.00; Mules, No. 2, 650.00; Salt, estimated at 50 lbs per bus., $5.00; Corn meal, 3.00; Flour, 17.50; common sole leather, 1.25; Best sole leather, 1.75; Good russet upper leather, 2.00; Light russet upper leather, 2.50; Good harness leather, heavy, 1.50; Good harness leather, light, 2.00; Kip and calf, black per side, 20.00; Hides good, and dry, per lb., 50c.

Condition and Obligations of the Detail.

            Farmers will sell the marketable surplus of provisions and grain, now on hand, and which they may raise from year to year, while the exemption continues, to the government and to the families of soldiers, at prices not exceeding those fixed by the Commissioners of the State under the Impressment Act.
           
Manufacturers of Salt, are required to sell the Salt manufactured by them, at prices not exceeding those fixed by the Commissioners of the State under the Impressment Act.
           
Physicians during the continuance of their details will not charge the families of officers and soldiers absent in the army, more than the customary rates before the war in said locality, and if their charges to others are extortionate, their details will be revoked.
           
Detailed Millers will not charge, or take more than one eight [sic] as toll, for grain ground on their mills, and will sell all the surplus of the toll received at their mills, (over a support for their families,) to the Government, soldiers' families, and indigent persons, at the prices fixed by the Commissioners of the State under the Impressment Act; and the owners of Saw Mills, will sell their lumber at $2.00 per hundred feet.
           
Black Smiths will not charge more than at the rate of seven dollars per day for their labor, where the material is furnished them, and where the party detailed furnishes the material, the actual cost of the same, shall be added to the price of the same per day.
           
Detailed Tanners will sell all of the leather manufactured at their yards, (over a support for their families) to the Government, soldiers' families, and indigent persons, at prices not exceeding those fixed by the Commissioners of the State, under the Impressment Act.
           
Detailed Shoemakers during their details will not charge more than at the rate of seven dollars per day for their labor, where the material is furnished them and where the party detailed furnishes the material the actual cost of the same shall be added to the price of their labor per day.
           
Detailed Wagon makers will not sell their labor at more than seven dollars per day where the material is furnished them, and where the party detailed furnishes the material, the actual cost of the same shall be added to the price of their labor per day.
           
Note.  Any evasion of this order, either by refusal to perform work, or to sell for Confederate money, or by obtaining provisions in exchange for work, or articles manufactured, or received by way of toll, at prices below their customary market value in the neighborhood, or by exchanging work or article manufactured or received for toll for provisions, or supplies for re-sail [sic], will be punished by prompt revocation of the detail.
           
All persons knowing of any violation of the above orders, are requested to report the facts.
                                               
                                                Thos. A. Flewellen,
                                               
                                                En. Officer, for Smith Co. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 4, c. 3

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of administration having been granted to the undersigned, on the estate of Aloah Fresbey, Deceased, by the Probate Court of Smith county, Texas, on the 26th day of September, 1864.  This is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate, to present them duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted will please make payment to
           
Tyler, Oct. 4th 1864.                                                  Stephen Reaves. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 4, c. 3

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration having been granted to the undersigned on the estate of James Spear dec'd, by the Probate Court of Smith county, on the 25th day of July, 1864.  This is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present the same duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted, will please make payment to
                                               
                                                John Spear, Adm'r.
           
Tyler, Oct. 18th, 1864.                                                   n43-6t 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 4, c. 3

Administrators Notice.

            Letters of Administration having been granted to the undersigned on the estate of W. H. Starr, dec'd, by the Probate Court of Smith county, on the 29th day of August, 1864.  This is to notify all persons holding claims against said estate to present the same duly authenticated within the time prescribed by law, and those indebted will please may payment to
                                               
                                                John W. McDougal, Admr. 

TYLER REPORTER, November 10, 1864, p. 4, c. 3

Copperas!  Copperas!

            Dr. F. L. Yoakum, has made a Depot of Copperas and Spanish Brown, etc., with me at Tyler, Texas.
           
v2-n26-1yr                                                                        W. S. Walker, Agent.