Social Sciences

Danielle Bailey

Danielle Bailey

Title: Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
Department: Social Sciences
Building: CAS 134
Email: dbailey@uttyler.edu
Phone: 903.566.7432

Degrees

Doctor of Philosophy in Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2015

Master of Forensic Science, The George Washington University, 2010

Bachelor of Science in Forensic and Investigative Science, West Virginia University, 2008

Biography

Dr. Bailey teaches a variety of courses relating to social science research, forensic science, and community corrections at both the undergraduate level and the graduate level. Her courses are taught in a variety of formats, including face to face, hybrid, and fully online. While at UT Tyler, the courses she has taught include the following: Introduction to Criminal Justice; Probation & Parole; Criminology; Research Methods; Survey of Forensic Science; Crime Scene Processing; Advanced Social Science Analysis; Judicial Policy.

As the Research Methods professor for the Criminal Justice program, Dr. Bailey oversees several undergraduate research projects each semester. Dr. Bailey has also worked as a Faculty Mentor for the Honor's Program. In Spring 2019, several of Dr. Bailey's students presented their research projects as poster presentations and oral presentations at the UT Tyler Student Research Lyceum.

Dr. Bailey’s research focuses include sexual offending, collateral consequences of public policy, perceptions of forensic science, and qualitative methods. Her recent research focuses on the impact of sex offender legislation on the lives of registered citizens and their family members, including the experiencing of economic and marital strain, social support, and reintegration concerns. Dr. Bailey has testified in front of the Texas House Committee on Urban Affairs (HB 387, 2017) and the Nebraska Judiciary Committee (LB 290, 2015) based on her research in this area. Dr. Bailey’s research has been published in Criminal Justice Policy Review, Criminal Justice Studies, American Journal of Criminal Justice, and Criminal Justice Review.